Monday, 30 March 2015

Latest Discover NLS edition now available

From the National Library of Scotland (via Facebook):

Latest edition of 'Discover NLS' out now

The latest issue of our award-winning magazine 'Discover NLS' is now available online.
Highlights in this issue include:

• Ian Rankin delving into the archive of Dame Muriel Spark
• Brian Cox, Michael Palin and Lorraine Kelly sharing their influences as they celebrate the Library’s Inspirations programme
• Mapping a life - the life and work of a forgotten Scottish mapmaker who helped make ocean navigation safer
• A man of letters - the acclaimed author James Kelman gives Michael Tierney a lesson in grammar

Read now: http://www.nls.uk/about-us/publications/discover-nls

Chris

For details on my latest book Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, and my other genealogy guide books please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html. To commission me for genealogical research, please visit my research site at www.scotlandsgreateststory.co.uk.

TNA podcast - Tracing Railway Ancestors

The latest podcast from the National Archives in England is entitled Tracing Railway Ancestors, a 36 minute talk given by Chris Heather.

The podcasts can be listened to at http://media.nationalarchives.gov.uk/index.php/tracing-railway-ancestors/ or downloaded for free from iTunes.

Don't forget also that the new edition of the British GENES podcast is also now available online! For more details visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/2015/03/second-british-genes-monthly-podcast.html

Chris

For details on my latest book Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, and my other genealogy guide books please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html. To commission me for genealogical research, please visit my research site at www.scotlandsgreateststory.co.uk.

Scottish chapbooks digitised and made available online

The University of Guelph in Ontario, supported by the Scottish Studies Foundation and the Jane Grier Family Fund, has digitised a series of Scottish chapbooks from its substantial collection and placed them online at a new dedicated platform at http://scottishchapbooks.org. Chapbooks, or 'cheap books', were pamphlets of eight to twenty-four pages that were created and sold in the 18th and 19th centuries.


The Scottish Chapbooks site does not appear to place the chapbooks into categories, but each has been given a series of tags (e.g. ballads, beauty, femininity, gender, Highlands, lordship, love, marriage, masculinity, songs, violence etc), with these tags acting as a means to sort them into categories. They can also be searched by keyword.

Canadian based Christine Woodcock has blogged more on the release at http://scottishgenealogytipsntricks.blogspot.co.uk/2015/03/scottish-chapbooks-now-available-online.html

Incidentally, if you find he chapbooks of interest, don't forget to visit the National Library of Scotland's Word on the Street project at http://digital.nls.uk/broadsides/, which has a series of digitised historic broadsides also available to read, covering similar territory.

(With thanks to Christine)

Chris

For details on my latest book Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, and my other genealogy guide books please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html. To commission me for genealogical research, please visit my research site at www.scotlandsgreateststory.co.uk.

More problems with National Records of Scotland computer services

The National Records of Scotland (www.nrscotland.gov.uk) has announced that it is again suffering technical problems with its computer services, including access to the NRS Catalogue, the NRAS Register, the SCAN Catalogue, the Tartan Register Scottish Documents, the Scottish Archives for Schools, and the Scottish Handwriting platforms. The problems also appear to be affecting service provision to the Historic Search Room computers, and the NAS Enquiries mailbox. The problems do not appear to be affecting the on site ScotlandsPeople service provision or the main NRS website itself. From the NRS Twitter feed (@NatRecordsScot), this appears to have been a problem since Friday of last week.

For further details visit http://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/news/2015/nrs-online-and-onsite-services

Chris

For details on my latest book Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, and my other genealogy guide books please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html. To commission me for genealogical research, please visit my research site at www.scotlandsgreateststory.co.uk.

Friday, 27 March 2015

British Army WW1 service records on FamilySearch

FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org) has added the surviving British Army First World War service returns from the the English based National Archives' War Office (collections WO363 and WO364) to its site, in a collection entitled United Kingdom, World War I Service Records, 1914-1920. Although the index is accessible, the images can only be viewed at an LDS family history centre or to 'signed-in members of supporting organisations'.

On the available index, my first search hasn't boded well with regard to its accuracy. I did a search for my wife's great uncle Martin Colleton. He is there, but the site tells me he is from 'Carrick, Fife, Scotland'. No, he really, really wasn't. He came from Carrick-on-Suir, Co. Tipperary in Ireland. Tread carefully!

(With thanks to John Reid's Anglo-Celtic Connections blog)

Chris

For details on my latest book Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, and my other genealogy guide books please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html. To commission me for genealogical research, please visit my research site at www.scotlandsgreateststory.co.uk.

Thursday, 26 March 2015

Unlocking Your Past - Cleveland FHS Family History Day

A quick heads up for an event in 2 weeks time that I am looking forward to immensely, not least because it will actually be the first time ever that I will be speaking to a family history society south of the border (excluding the SoG based in London!) - and also because it just happens to be in my favourite part of England (Yorkshire!). The following are the details and programme for the family history day being organised by Cleveland Family History Society (www.clevelandfhs.org.uk) at Scotch Corner on Saturday April 11th:

UNLOCKING YOUR PAST
Spring Family History Day 2015
Scotch Corner Holiday Inn, Saturday 11 April 2015
Venue: Holiday Inn, Scotch Corner, Richmond DL10 6NR, North Yorkshire, Junction A1M/A66

Cleveland, North Yorkshire & South Durham Family History Society invite beginners and experienced family historians to their 16th Family History Day.

We will have specialists on hand to give assistance together with bookstands and displays.

Ben Sanderson is Head of Press, Social Media and Internal Communications at the British Library Boston Spa.

The presentation A Treasure Trove for Historians Ben will be giving will provide some background information on the history of the British Library and its collections, then goes into some detail about what people can do at the Boston Spa reading room, with some practical information on registration and ordering. Ben also delves into some of the online resources on the British Library website which are available as soon as you open your laptop.

Chris Paton was formerly a Television Producer & Director of History Programmes and now works as a Professional Genealogist running the Scotlands Greatest Story Research Service. Chris is a published author of several books and also a regular contributor to genealogy magazines such as Your Family Tree, Family History Monthly, Family Tree Magazine, Your Family History and many more publications.

Tracing your Irish Family History on the Internet is his first talk and Chris will guide you through the many exciting developments now allowing us an opportunity to reclaim our ancestral past. The second subject Chris will talk about is Scottish Marriage, where a quick trip over the border offered a good opportunity for English folk to get married under Scots Law after 1753, without parental permission and all the other restrictions that Hardwicke introduced to stop irregular marriage, which actually remained legal in Scotland up to 1939 hence Gretna Green etc.

PROGRAMME

9.45 – 10.30 Registration & Coffee

10.30 – 12.00 Ben Sanderson : “A Treasure Trove for Historians - Using the British Library at Boston Spa”

12.00 – 1.00 Buffet Lunch

1.00 – 2.30 Chris Paton  “Tracing your Irish Family History on the Internet”

2.30 – 3.00 Coffee Break

3.00 – 4.30 Chris Paton  “Scottish Marriage: Instantly Buckled for Life”

There is ample car parking close to the main reception entrance.
For those requiring accommodation please contact Scotch Corner Hotel Reception.
If you require accommodation please contact Holiday Inn Reception: Tel: 01748 850900

Talks including lunch and refreshments £15:00 per person.

The booking form for the event is available at the bottom of this page: www.clevelandfhs.org.uk/Articles/SFHD%20Events/SFHD%20Event%202015.html

Hopefully see you there!

(With thanks to Cleveland FHS)

Chris

For details on my latest book Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, and my other genealogy guide books please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html. To commission me for genealogical research, please visit my research site at www.scotlandsgreateststory.co.uk.

Discover Your Ancestors 4th annual bookazine now on sale

From Discover Your Ancestors magazine:

The 4th annual print edition of Discover Your Ancestors is a unique collection of original articles, written by experts, on a wide range of family and social history themes. Inside you’ll find a wealth of information and inspiration, helping you to trace your ancestors back through time and understand what their lives were actually like.

Each issue of Discover Your Ancestors - which also has a digital edition, the Periodical, published online every month - is different, much bigger than a standard magazine, and amazing value. Issue 4 is packed with almost 200 pages, with well over 30 features covering everything from medieval records to life in a Victorian asylum, from DNA research to the history of spa towns. We also have an exclusive on the swashbuckling ancestry of James Bond actor Daniel Craig.

Not only that, Issue 4 (now available in branches of WHSmiths, Sainsburys, Morrisons, Easons and Martin McColl as well as larger groups in the USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand) has our first-ever cover DVD, with an amazing collection of resources and offers - including a FREE three-month subscription to TheGenealogist.co.uk - worth more than £130 in total.

Find out more at www.discoveryourancestors.co.uk!

(With thanks to Andrew Chapman)

Chris

For details on my latest book Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, and my other genealogy guide books please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html. To commission me for genealogical research, please visit my research site at www.scotlandsgreateststory.co.uk.

Historic Scotland properties opening this April

From Historic Scotland (www.historic-scotland.gov.uk):

Historic sites’ doors spring open for visitors

One of the Lothian’s most well-known historical sites will re-open its doors next month (1 April).

Crichton Castle, near Pathhead in Midlothian, is one of over 30 Historic Scotland properties across Scotland that will be reopening to the public after the winter months.

Built as the lordly residence of the Crichtons and later home to the earls of Bothwell, the castle is notable for its stunning 16th century courtyard facade.

Across the country, Historic Scotland’s seasonal staff are back at their posts and ready to welcome visitors, from Kisimul Castle in the Western Isles, known as the ‘Castle on the Sea’, to Smailholm Tower in the Borders.

Susan Loch, Head of Visitor Operations and Community Engagement at Historic Scotland said: “Our seasonal sites include castles, abbeys, churches and museums and it’s always exciting when they reopen after the long winter months. With longer days and warmer weather, spring is the perfect time to explore properties such as Crichton Castle and take advantage of the truly stunning sites we have across Scotland. No matter where you are in Scotland, history is never too far away.”

Properties opening on Wednesday 1 April include:
  • Lochleven Castle, near Kinross, where Mary Queen of Scots had the most traumatic year of her life – imprisoned and forced to abdicate, she managed to escape after a year of being held there
  • Hermitage Castle in the Borders, with its history of intrigue, murders, trysts, torture, and treason.
  • Cambuskenneth Abbey, near Stirling, once where Robert the Bruce held his parliament, now accessed across a field (watch out for roaming cattle)
  • Kinnaird Head Castle Lighthouse and Museum, Fraserburgh, which is still in working order and offers a challenging climb

For further information on opening hours, access and locations, visit: www.historic-scotland.gov.uk

(With thanks to Grant Thomson)

Chris

For details on my latest book Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, and my other genealogy guide books please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html. To commission me for genealogical research, please visit my research site at www.scotlandsgreateststory.co.uk.

Scottish hearth tax records 1691-96 now fully transcribed

The surviving 43 volumes of Scottish Hearth Tax records from 1691-1695 have now been fully transcribed on the ScotlandsPlaces website (www.scotlandsplaces.gov.uk). The transcripts are free to access, although a subscription to the platform is required to see the original records.

For further information visit www.scotlandsplaces.gov.uk/digital-volumes/historical-tax-rolls/hearth-tax-records-1691-1695.

(With thanks to @NatRecordsScot)

Chris

For details on my latest book Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, and my other genealogy guide books please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html. To commission me for genealogical research, please visit my research site at www.scotlandsgreateststory.co.uk.

Ancestry uploads records for Bexley in Kent

The following databases for Bexley in the the English county of Kent have now been uploaded to Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk):

Bexley, Kent, England, Baptisms, Marriages, and Burials, 1558-1812
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=60572

Bexley, Kent, England, Births and Baptisms, 1813-1925
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=60635

Bexley, Kent, England, Marriages and Banns, 1754-1935
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=60636

Bexley, Kent, England, Deaths and Burials, 1813-1985
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=60637

Bexley, Kent, England, Cemetery Registers, 1879-1985
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=60571

The records have been sourced from Bexley Local Studies and Archive Centre, Bexleyheath, Kent, England, with images reproduced by courtesy of The Mayor and Burgesses of the London Borough of Bexley, London, England (www.bexley.gov.uk). Full details via the links.

Chris

For details on my latest book Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, and my other genealogy guide books please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html. To commission me for genealogical research, please visit my research site at www.scotlandsgreateststory.co.uk.