Sunday, 24 March 2019

FindmyPast adds British regimental histories and Scottish criminal database

The latest additions to FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk):


Scotland, Midlothian, 1834 Dalkeith Census
Search for your ancestors in the 1834 census for Dalkeith, Midlothian. The collection contains over 5,000 transcripts that that will reveal a combination of your ancestor's address, age, occupation, place of worship and corresponding details for their fellow household members. If they were a child at the time, the records will also reveal the names of both their weekday and Sunday schools.

British Army Records & Regimental Histories
Discover your British military ancestor with these regimental histories. Regimental histories are an excellent resource for discovering more about your ancestor's military career. You can discover where the regiment was stationed, read despatches from the First World War and records of the deeds and achievements of the British Army. This fascinating collection of more than a thousand PDF images currently includes three publications including;

* The 1st Battalion Royal Scots in South Africa, 1899-1902.
* The Green Howards in The Great War.
* The History of the Lincolnshire Regiment 1914-1918

US Servicemen in North Devon, England 1943-1945
Explore lists of over 5,000 US servicemen who were stationed in North Devon during WW2. The records consist of original visitor books kept by the local servicemen's club. The servicemen served at the Assault Training Centre in North Devon, which was set up in 1942. It was established during the Second World War as a centre to develop and practice amphibious assault exercises to prepare for the Normandy landing on D-Day. They practiced on the beaches at Woolacombe and Saunton Sands.

Scotland, Criminal Database 1801-1917
Search this database of more than 130,000 records of Crown Office Precognitions and High Court Trial Papers to find out if your ancestor was ever in trouble with the law or the victim of a crime. Each record includes a transcript of the original document that, depending on its age and nature, may reveal a wide variety of facts. Records may include biographical details surrounding your ancestor's birth, their address, descriptions and occupation as well as details of their trial. This may include the date, location and nature of their offense, the names of their victims, previous convictions, the date and location of their trial and the sentence they received.

International Records Update – El Salvador
Over 1.1 million records from the republic of El Salvador have recently been added to our growing collection of world records. The new additions consist of three indexes of baptisms, civil births and marriages spanning the years 1750 to 1940

British & Irish Newspaper Update
This week we have added over 110,000 new pages to our collection of British & Irish newspapers. We are delighted to welcome two specialist titles, Justice – 'the oldest socialist journal in the British Islands,' and the Tablet, a Roman Catholic newspaper. We also have one further brand new addition, the Portadown News from County Armagh in Northern Ireland. We have also updated two of our existing titles, the West Middlesex Gazette and the Staffordshire Sentinel. This week we have added the years 1930 to 1938 to the Staffordshire Sentinel, with 28,000 new searchable pages.

Further information and links at https://blog.findmypast.co.uk/findmypast-friday-march-22nd-2632375939.html

Chris

My next Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course starts May 13th 2019 - see https://www.pharostutors.com/coursesmainsd.php. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. For my Scottish and Irish themed books, visit https://britishgenes.blogspot.com/p/my-books.html. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Thursday, 21 March 2019

New look National Archives of Ireland website

The National Archives of Ireland has rolled out a new look for its online platfiorm at www.nationalarchives.ie.


Scrolling down its front page brings you to various topics ogf interest to the family historian, in its Explore Collections section:
  • Decade of Centenaries
  • Our Genealogy Website
  • Chief Secretary’s Office Registered Papers, 1818-1922
  • Anglo-Irish Treaty, 1921

The new site has a much needed, more modern feel to it, and should translate well for tablet and phone access.

Its greatest weakness, however, remains its online catalogue. Once that receives a bit more love and attention - and considerably more catalogued information! - the latest Irish revolution will be complete!

PS: Keep an eye out for some changes to the PRONI website in the north over the next few months, with access to certain collections being rearranged within the platform at www.nidirect.gov.uk/proni

Chris

My next Scottish Research Online course starts March 11th 2019 - see www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. For my Scottish and Irish themed books, visit https://britishgenes.blogspot.com/p/my-books.html. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

British Newspaper Archive at 31 million pages

The British Newspaper Archive (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) is at the point of reaching 31 million pages of its planned 40 million pages on the site.


Released in the last 30 days:

Tablet
1843-1851, 1855-1864, 1866-1885

Sunday Times
1823, 1825-1827, 1831, 1833, 1853, 1890-1912

Bolton Evening News
1897

South Wales Daily Post
1901

Portadown News
1859-1921

West Middlesex Gazette
1894-1895, 1898-1910, 1912-1941

Justice
1884-1925

Staffordshire Sentinel
1930-1938, 1940-1941, 1943-1950

Ealing Gazette and West Middlesex Observer
1898-1910, 1912-1923

Sunday Life
2000-2005

Hyde & Glossop Weekly News, and North Cheshire Herald
1875

Tottenham and Edmonton Weekly Herald
1877

Berks and Oxon Advertiser
1959

Dublin Intelligence
1723-1724

West Sussex County Times
1912

Sunday World (Dublin)
1895

Kensington Post
1918-1972, 1987-1988, 1990

Harefield Gazette
1989-1990

Orcadian
1854-1869, 1901-1912

Reading Evening Post
1993

Middlesex County Times
1939-1941, 1953-1954, 1957-1976, 1978, 1980

Amersham Advertiser
1991-1992

Airdrie & Coatbridge Advertiser
1880, 1883, 1886, 1890, 1892

Drogheda Argus and Leinster Journal
1961-1964

Orkney Herald, and Weekly Advertiser and Gazette for the Orkney & Zetland Islands
1888-1949

Enniscorthy Guardian
1986

Rugby Advertiser
1914

Cambridgeshire Times
1872-1873

Littlehampton Gazette
1939

Folkestone Express, Sandgate, Shorncliffe & Hythe Advertiser
1868-1894, 1901, 1903-1913, 1915-1924

Central Somerset Gazette
1862-1870, 1872-1887, 1889-1899, 1901-1911, 1913-1949, 1951-1981

Oxfordshire Telegraph
1858-1859

Sunday Independent (Dublin)
1998-2006

Evening Herald (Dublin)
1930

Chris

My next Scottish Research Online course starts March 11th 2019 - see www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. For my Scottish and Irish themed books, visit https://britishgenes.blogspot.com/p/my-books.html. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Tuesday, 19 March 2019

Company behind US Family Tree magazine files for bankruptcy

There's an extraordinary situation unfolding just now in the United States, detailed by Roberta Estes on her blog at https://dna-explained.com/2019/03/19/family-tree-magazine-and-family-tree-university-files-bankruptcy/.

New York based F&W Media, the firm behind the US based magazine Family Tree (not affiliated to the UK magazine of the same name), and its Family Tree University, has filed for bankruptcy, leaving many contributors unpaid. According to Roberta, when the firm made its application to the Court, "The court was provided with a list of creditors 542 pages in length, with 30 names per page, for a whopping total of 16,260 people or companies that they owe money."

The full story is outlined in Roberta's blog post, and also by Forbes magazine at https://www.forbes.com/sites/tonysilber/2019/03/11/fw-media-citing-debt-decline-and-mismanagement-files-for-bankruptcy-protection/#205649d84355.

Here's hoping that all who are owed money are paid in due course. There may be many free resources available online, but professional genealogists are not charities, and deserve to be paid as much as any other profession. And for those who worked on the editorial side of things, I suspect this is as big a shock for them - here's hoping they successfully find alternative work.

(With thanks to Roberta for sharing)

Chris

My next Scottish Research Online course starts March 11th 2019 - see www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. For my Scottish and Irish themed books, visit https://britishgenes.blogspot.com/p/my-books.html. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Monday, 18 March 2019

Computer problems at Glasgow Genealogy Centre

Glasgow Genealogy Centre has the following message online at https://www.glasgow.gov.uk/index.aspx?articleid=17698 for the registrars's service, which offers access to ScotlandsPeople:

Please note we are currently experiencing temporary technical difficulties in the Genealogy Centre.

As a result of this, we are currently not able to take bookings and the centre is currently unavailable, but services will resume as soon as possible .

If you have already booked an appointment, we will be in touch with you soon.

We apologise for any inconvenience this may cause and will aim to be back up and running as soon as we can.

I have just called the centre and have been advised that there is a slight update on this. Last week, the centre was closed to bookings entirely. However, this week they are taking six bookings a day only, with only one slot left for this coming Thursday 21st, to see how things play out.

I blogged about the problems I personally experienced in Glasgow recently (see https://britishgenes.blogspot.com/2019/02/scotlandspeople-computer-issue-at.html), which have been ongoing for several weeks. Here's hoping that things will be mended soon.

In the meantime, if you are seeking to visit Glasgow to do research, call 0141 287 8365 or email genealogy@glasgow.gov.uk prior to a visit, to make sure the service is available.

Chris

My next Scottish Research Online course starts March 11th 2019 - see www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. For my Scottish and Irish themed books, visit https://britishgenes.blogspot.com/p/my-books.html. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Saturday, 16 March 2019

Ancestry adds Cork Marriage Licence Bonds Index 1623-1750

Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk) hads added the following Irish collection:

Cork, Ireland, Marriage Licence Bonds Index, 1623-1750
https://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=61710
Source: Copied, with the permission of the Master of Rolls, from the Index prepared in the Public Record Office by Herbert Webb Gillman. Index to the Marriage Licence Bonds of the diocese of Cork and Ross, Ireland. Cork, Ireland: 1896-1897.

About Cork, Ireland, Marriage Licence Bonds Index, 1623-1750

Historical Context

This collection comprises an index to the Marriage Licence Bonds of the diocese of Cork and Ross, Ireland. The original rolls from which the printed index was created are held in the National Archives of Ireland (formerly the Public Record Office of Ireland). A Marriage Licence Bond was entered into before a Bishop, prior to the granting of the Marriage Licence, with the purpose of ensuring that the impending Marriage was legally sound. Two solvent individuals (one of which was usually the bridegroom) entered into the bond for a stated sum.

What can I find in these records?

You may be able to find the following information (where available):

Name
Gender
Name of Spouse
Year of Marriage
Place of Marriage

Chris

My next Scottish Research Online course starts March 11th 2019 - see www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. For my Scottish and Irish themed books, visit https://britishgenes.blogspot.com/p/my-books.html. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

FindmyPast adds Irish Newspaper Transcript Archive

Latest additions to FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk):


Irish Newspaper Transcript Archive, ffolliott Collection 1756-1850
Search a comprehensive catalogue of more than 54,000 biographical notices from Irish newspapers compiled by the celebrated Irish genealogist Rosemary ffolliott. Each record includes a transcript and original image that enable you to discover if your Irish ancestors had details of their birth, marriage or death announcement printed in a newspaper. Rosemary ffolliott was Ireland's premier genealogist, at the age of 23 she had her first book The Pooles of Mayfield, a history of settler families in the Cork area published in 1958. From the 1950s to the 1970s she was a member of the panel of freelance researchers engaged by the Genealogical Office, becoming a prominent member of the Irish Genealogical Research Society whose journal The Irish Genealogist she edited for a time.

Kerry Histories & Reference Guides
Explore three fascinating publications to learn more about the history of Kerry and its inhabitants. Each record is available in a PDF format. Use the previous and next buttons at the top of the page to browse through the publication

This collection currently holds the following titles:

A History of the Kingdom of Kerry - Published in 1871, written by M.F. Cusack. The book covers the history of the county from early times. There are extracts from different documents, these include the Charters of the towns of Dingle and Tralee, etc and the complete text from the 1673 report on the State of Kerry.

A Pictorial and Descriptive Guide to Killarney, The Kerry Coast, Glengariff, Cork and The South West of Ireland - First published in 1880, this is the seventh edition of the guide. Illustrated throughout, the guide includes photographs, maps, advertisements and descriptions of the places visited.

The Ancient and Present State of the County of Kerry - Published in 1756, written by Charles Smith M.D. Originally published privately by Charles Smith after the Dublin Philosophical Society had ceased, this is the fourth county history written singularly or jointly published from Smith.

Limerick Histories & Reference Guides
This collection also contains three historic publications that can be used to learn more about the place and time in which your Irish ancestors lived.

This collection currently holds three titles:

Limerick and its Sieges - Published in 1890, written by Rev. James Dowd, A.B., T.C.D. This is the second edition of the book. Dowd begins his preface with the following; 'This sketch of Limerick and its Sieges, as well as other notes concerning the place of chief historic interest in the county of Limerick, were put together by the writer more for his own information than with an eye towards their publication, at least in a book form'.

Round About The County Of Limerick - Published in 1896 written by Rev. James Dowd, A.B., T.C.D. Dowd begins his preface with the following; 'In asking my readers to accompany me on a Historical and Archaeological Tour Round About the County of Limerick, I have consulted their convenience by grouping events around the places brought under notice. The arrangement may lead to occasional repetition, and the narrative may sometime be left incomplete, to be resumed and finished elsewhere. But, on the other hand, it possesses the undoubted advantage of fixing the attention of the reader upon the events and occurrences which render the places visited memorable.'

The History, Topography and Antiquities of the County and City of Limerick, 2 Vols - Published in 1826 and 1827, written by Rev. Patrick Fitzgerald and John James McGregor. The book begins with the following; 'An author who should undertake the difficult task of writing a general history of Ireland, must, for the most obvious reasons, divide his work into three grand periods, namely, the fabulous, the obscure, and the authentic.'

United States Passport Applications
Over 62,000 additional records spanning the years 1795 to 1925 have been added to our collection of United States Passport Applications. This collection of regular passport applications has been compiled from the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) collections M1372 and M1490. Each record will provide a transcript and, where available, an image of the original documents.

England, Domesday Book 1086 Browse
Explore Britain's earliest public record as part of your subscription to Findmypast with a browse search allows you to search each counties book from beginning to end. The Domesday Book is Britain's earliest public record, it was commissioned in December 1085 by King William the Conqueror, and it provides an invaluable insight into 11th century Norman England.

International records update
Our international collections continue to grow. This week we have added four new indexes from the Central American country of Costa Rica. The new indexes contain over 800,000 records covering baptisms, marriages, deaths and civil registrations between 1700 and 1975. These records have been sourced from the International Genealogical Index.

Our Costa Rica collections currently include:

Costa Rica Baptism Index 1700-1915
Costa Rica Marriage Index 1750-1920
Costa Rica Death Index 1787-1900
Costa Rica Civil Registration, 1860-1975 Image Browse

British & Irish newspaper update

This week have added 139,520 new pages to The Archive. We are delighted to welcome four brand new titles this week, three of which cover the late twentieth century: London title the Harefield Gazette, the Reading Evening Post and Buckinghamshire title the Amersham Advertiser. Rounding off our new titles this week is the Orcadian, which covers the years 1854 to 1912 and was published in Kirkwall, Orkney.

Further details at https://blog.findmypast.co.uk/findmypast-friday-march-15th-2631628139.html

Chris

My next Scottish Research Online course starts March 11th 2019 - see www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. For my Scottish and Irish themed books, visit https://britishgenes.blogspot.com/p/my-books.html. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Punch added to Irish Newspaper Archives

From the Irish Newspaper Archives (www.irishnewsarchive.com):


Happy St Patrick's weekend to all our friends and members.
SAVE 40% Off our annual membership and enjoy NEW CONTENT

40% discount one year code - StPAT40
20% discount one month code - StPAT20

New Titles:

Punch or London Charivari Magazine Archive 1844-1852, 1860-1862, 1865-1900, 1902-1925

We are delighted to announce the release of Punch magazine to our archives:

Established in 1841 by Mr Henry Mayhew and Ebenezer Landells this satirical and humorous British magazine offered the people at the time a refreshing new view of Britain’s cultural and political landscape. Edited by Henry Mayhew and Mark Lemon the magazines masthead/title was borrowed from the anarchic glove puppet, Mr. Punch, of Punch and Judy. The magazine’s first few years were difficult with low readership and in 1845 Mayhew left. In 1842 the Punch magazine was purchase by Bradbury & Evans. Using the latest in high production printing technologies they were able to capitalise on reaching a larger audience.

The Punch was published for over 160 years and finally ceased to publish in 2004.

(With thanks to Andrew Martin)

Chris

My next Scottish Research Online course starts March 11th 2019 - see www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. For my Scottish and Irish themed books, visit https://britishgenes.blogspot.com/p/my-books.html. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Free access to MyHeritage Irish collections

MyHeritage is offering free access to its Irish collections until March 20th 2019.

To access the records, visit https://www.myheritage.com/research/catalog?location=Ireland


 Chris

My next Scottish Research Online course starts March 11th 2019 - see www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. For my Scottish and Irish themed books, visit https://britishgenes.blogspot.com/p/my-books.html. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

UTV Archive at PRONI - and other PRONI news

Yesterday (Friday 15th) I had the pleasure to attend the latest Stakeholders' Forum at PRONI, Northern Ireland's national archive, in Belfast - albeit after a fairly choppy ferry crossing. The following is a summary of the some of the latest developments:

PRONI Guide to Church Records

It was confirmed that the version of the document, PRONI Guide to Church Records, online at https://www.nidirect.gov.uk/publications/proni-guide-church-records is up to date. Accompanying this is a separate document, Church Records Available as Digital Copies in PRONI, which details which records exist in digital format on the archive's catalogue system, CALM. Both are invaluable resources for planning a trip to PRONI. It was confirmed that recent church records collections brought in for digitisation are now currently being worked upon.


Cataloguing:

The onsite catalogue, CALM, has had some performance issues over the last six months, which now seem to be resolved.

PRONI is currently cataloguing the Michael J. Murphy Papers, with help from students. Murphy was a folklorist and writer, with his papers from 1942-83 detailing his work for the Folklore Commission, with notebooks, diaries, and other materials.


Recent Deposits

The Ulster Society of Organists and Choirmasters papers consists of 12 boxes of material, including minutes, photographs, and correspondence from 1918-2017. Catalogued under D4701.

The Northern Ireland District Association Camping and Caravanning Club papers, with minute books, photographs, scrapbooks etc from 1964-2005, 15 volumes of material within 3 boxes, will be held under D4702.

The Northern Ireland Council on Voluntary Action (NICVA) has donated minutes form 1938-92, as well as copies of its 'Scope' magazine from 1975-2008. This will be held under D4708.

Coming soon:

More Ulster Farmers Union materials minute books, photographs, etc, to be held under D1050/13.

The Presbyterian Children's Society – 10 boxes of material, correspondence and papers, application forms over the last 50 years, and more.

Ballyclare Church Lads Brigade - 6 boxes of material (including one for Limerick district), from the 1920s, including minute books, manuals, scrap books, and other records.


The UTV Archive at PRONI

This was of particular interest to me, having previously worked in TV myself (and having once interviewed the head of UTV!). Ulster Television was established in 1959, as the first commercial broadcaster on the island of Ireland. Its huge archive covers a vast amount of Northern Irish history and culture from that point, including interviews with Seamus Heaney, George Best, Van Morrison, Brendan Behan and others, of course, extensive coverage of the Troubles.

Unfortunately, as UTV has now been purchased by the ITV network, its archive is to be relocated to Leeds in England. I am personally appalled that Northern Ireland's broadcast heritage is leaving the country, but thankfully, PRONI has secured a five year agreement with ITV to digitise as much of the material as possible before it is sent to England for permanent storage. The aim is that Northern Ireland Screen will then make the material available on its Digital Film Archive (https://digitalfilmarchive.net).

About a hundred pallets of material from Havelock House are being taken by PRONI for the project, containing material from 1959-1993, mainly unedited rushes, with about 72,000 items. The following gives an idea of the breakdown of what is to be worked on:

6543 film cans (mainly 16mm), and 4 boxes of loose film
54,469 Betacam tapes (SP, Digibeta and 90SP), and 112 boxes of uncatalogued tapes
1295 one inch reels
83 U-Matic tapes

The film material is being prioritised, as this is older and may be more brittle.

As part of this arrangement, PRONI will be opening a viewing room soon to allow visitors to view some of the tapes and films, and we were treated to a glimpse of this by Stephanie Routhier-Perry, who is working on the project. The room caters for film with a Steenbeck player, and various tape formats, including one ince, U-Matic, Beta SP, Digibeta and smaller tape formats also. Access provision will be quite strictly conditioned – appointment only, one viewer at a time, no ledning facility, and subject to normal PRONI conditions. Permission to purchase any material will have to be done through ITV.

In the Q&A I asked about whether UTV programmes are included in the project, but was advised that these are already in Leeds, PRONI is working mainly with rushes only.



Women in the Archives 

This is an initiative PRONI is working with local musuems and libraries on, and as a part of it, there will be two exhibitions in April, in partnership with the Linen Hall Library, called 'In Her Words' and 'Anonymous was a Woman'.

Another recent project called 'Buried in Belfast' saw 25 people working on stories from Milltown and City Cemetery, the outcome of which will see further initiatives, including a proposed trail map.


City Cemetery records

As a part of our discussions, it emerged that Belfast City Council is looking at possibly upgrading the online digital provision for its city cemetery records, with features such as a potential Boolean search to be developed, possibly even geo-tagging of graves. It is early days, but one to watch. We were also advised that the Council now has a dedicated Bereavement Services Manager, Michael Patterson.


Social Media:

PRONI now has an Instagram account at publicrecordofficeni, which went online a couple of weeks ago.


Exhibitions:

Plantations in Ulster, 1600-41, will launch at Central Library in Derry on April 5th. This will tie in with the Plantation themed resources book which PRONI released last year.


New online payment system

Janet Hancock advised that a new secure invoice and payments system for remote enquiries is hopefully going to launch soon in late spring or in the summer. You will be able to pay for looks ups, do copyright declarations online, and gain digital access. We may get a short presentation on this at the next forum meeting.


Flagship Events:

PRONI's oldest document is a papal bull from the 13th century, concerning the creation of Paisley Abbey in Renfrewshire, Scotland, and held with the Hamilton Papers. This year sees its 800th anniversary, and there will be a tie in event on June 12th at PRONI with speakers Matthew Hammond and William Roulston.

The first of the Ulster Historical Foundation's annual Dr. Brian Trainor Memorial Lectures will take place this September (see https://www.ancestryireland.com/brian-trainor-memorial-lecture-fund).

(With thanks to all the forum members, especially Stephanie Routhier-Perry and Stephen Scarth for the visit to the multimedia room)

Chris

My next Scottish Research Online course starts March 11th 2019 - see www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. For my Scottish and Irish themed books, visit https://britishgenes.blogspot.com/p/my-books.html. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.