Saturday, 27 May 2017

Recent UK additions and updates to FamilySearch

Still catching up from some recent news. The following collections on FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org) are shown as being most recently launched or updated on FamilySearch - all are either English or UK collections:

  • England, Warwickshire, Parish Registers, 1535-1984 (28 Apr 2017)
  • England, Norfolk, Parish Registers (County Record Office), 1510-1997 (28 Apr 2017)
  • England, Essex, Bishop's Transcripts, 1779-1892 (28 Apr 2017)
  • England, Northumberland, Non-conformist Records, 1708-1982 (28 Apr 2017)
  • England, Northumberland, Parish Registers, 1538-1950 (28 Apr 2017)
  • England, Manchester, Parish Registers, 1603-1910 (28 Apr 2017)
  • England, Northumberland, Cumberland, Durham, Miscellaneous Records, 969-2007 (20 Apr 2017)
  • England, Durham Diocese, Marriage Bonds & Allegations, 1692-1900 (11 Apr 2017)
  • British Newspaper Archives, Obituaries (16 Mar 2017)
  • England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975 (03 Mar 2017)
  • United Kingdom, Royal Hospital Chelsea: Discharge Documents of Pensioners 1760-1887 (WO 122) (01 Mar 2017)
  • England, Derbyshire, Church of England Parish Registers, 1537-1918 (28 Feb 2017)
  • England, Lancashire, Oldham Cemetery Registers, 1797-2004 (13 Jan 2017)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

FindmyPast - latest additions

FindmyPast (www.findmypast.com) has added several datasets this week. The following collections for England are amongst them:


Surrey institutional records 1788-1939

Explore over 200,000 assorted records from 16 institutions across the English county of Surrey, including poor law unions, workhouses, schools, infirmaries, goals and more. Each result will provide you with a transcript of key details from the source material. The records cover 13 places in Surrey: Addlestone, Chertsey, Cobham, Dorking, Farnham, Godstone, Guildford, Hambledon, Redhill, Richmond Upon Thames, Southwark, Warlingham, and Woking.


Essex Baptism Index 1538-1917

Over 32,000 records covering 50 parishes across the county have been added to the Essex Baptism index. The collection now contains more than 279,000 records taken from a range of original parish and probate documents.


Sussex, Eastbourne Gazette Newspaper Notices

Over 186,000 records have been added to our collection of Eastbourne Gazette Newspaper Notices. The Eastbourne Gazette was a weekly tabloid paper first published in 1859.


Derbyshire Hospital Admissions and Deaths 1855-1913

Over 800 records have been added to our collection of Derbyshire Hospital Admission & Deaths. The collection now contains over 5,000 records taken from two different sources: Derbyshire Royal Infirmary, Deaths 1892 – 1912 and Victoria Memorial Cottage Hospital, Ashbourne Admissions 1899 – 1913.

Further additions include more Irish Newspapers, Australian Capital Territory Deaths and Vermont, Enrolled Militia Records 1861-1867 - further dteails on these and the above-mentioned English collections are available at https://blog.findmypast.co.uk/findmypast-friday-may-26th-2422212258.html.

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

New British Newspaper Archive front page

The British Newspaper Archive (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) website has changed its front page design yet again. It now looks like this on a PC:



And this is how it appears now on a tablet:


The BNA has attempted to explain this new layout at http://blog.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/2017/05/25/our-new-look/.

I have no idea if this was intended to be a better interface for those accessing the site on a PC or from the use of a tablet, but users on both platforms now have much more scrolling to do to find other more useful features, such as recent additions, located well to the bottom and off screen.

I suppose it creates employment...!

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Friday, 26 May 2017

TheGenealogist adds 1920s UK passenger lists

From TheGenealogist (www.thegenealogist.co.uk):

New Passenger Lists go online for the 1920s era

TheGenealogist has just released four and a half million BT27 records for the 1920s. These Outbound Passenger Lists are part of the growing immigration and emigration record sets on TheGenealogist and contain the historical records of passengers who departed by sea from U.K. ports in the years between 1920 and 1929.


With the addition of this decade of records, the already strong Immigration, Emigration, Naturalisation and passenger list resources on TheGenealogist have been significantly expanded.

The fully searchable records released today will allow researchers to:

● Identify potential family members travelling together with SmartSearch. TheGenealogist’s unique system can recognise family members together on the same voyage. In this case it will display a family icon which allows you to view the entire family with one click.

● Find people travelling to America, Canada, India, New Zealand, Australia and elsewhere in the Passenger lists of people leaving from the United Kingdom by sea.

● See images of the original documents which were kept by the Board of Trade's Commercial and Statistical Department and its successors.

● Discover the ages, last address and where the passenger intended to make their permanent residence.

● These fully indexed records enable family historians to search by name, year, country of departure, country of arrival, port of embarkation and port of destination.


Those with ancestors who travelled out of Britain will welcome this fascinating new release from TheGenealogist that adds to their Immigration and Emigration records which already includes passenger lists from as far back as 1896 and the valuable Naturalisation and Denization records.

(With thanks to Nick Thorne)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Thursday, 25 May 2017

Recent National Archives podcasts

The following podcasts have recently bveen made available online by the National Archives in England (www.nationalarchives.gov.uk):

‘Dadland’: the father who was also an undercover guerrilla agent
http://media.nationalarchives.gov.uk/index.php/keggie-carew/

Keggie Carew discusses her book ‘Dadland’, a story about a madcap English childhood, the poignant breakdown of a family, and dementia. The novel centres upon her father Tom Carew, an enigmatic, unorthodox character, who was an undercover guerrilla agent during the Second World War.
‘Dadland’ is the winner of the Costa Biography Award 2016 and a Sunday Times Top Ten Bestseller.

Author: Keggie Carew Duration: 00:36:57


Black British politics and the Anti-Apartheid struggle
http://media.nationalarchives.gov.uk/index.php/black-british-politics-anti-apartheid-struggle/

In 1948, from the introduction of apartheid in South Africa, racial discrimination galvanized the international community into protest. British people and black communities in particular attempted to lead the global opposition against apartheid.
Historian Dr Elizabeth Williams (Goldsmiths, University of London) will discuss aspects of the documents she looked at while writing her book ‘The Politics of Race in Britain and South Africa: Black British Solidarity and the Apartheid Struggle’ (2015).
Please note, due to a technical error this recording ended a few minutes prior to the end of the talk.

Author: Dr Elizabeth Williams Duration: 00:53:59


From the Somme to Arras
http://media.nationalarchives.gov.uk/index.php/somme-arras/

Andrew Lock discusses the progress made by the British Expeditionary Forces between the battles of the Somme (1916) and Arras (1917). Although lessons were learned during the Somme campaign, Arras clearly exposed command and preparation deficiencies, leading to setbacks and the highest casualty rate of any British offensive in the war.

Author: Andrew Lock Duration: 00:49:30

All can be listened to via the above links, downloaded from the sites, or listened to via iTunes.

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Septhttps://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
11th 2017 - details at
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Ancestry adds poor law union removals from England to Ireland

Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk) has released two new Irish collections, as indexed as part of its World Archives Project. The following are the descriptions:

Ireland, Poor Law Union Removals From England, 1859-1860
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=61317

Following the Act of Settlement in 1662, parishes in the United Kingdom were obliged to help those who were ‘legally settled'. If they could not fulfil the required criteria, they could be removed by force and sent to their parish of legal settlement.

Removal Orders could be issued if the person or family were deemed to have no right to settlement in the parish. Removal Orders record the names of the poor persons involved, the parish from which they were removed and the parish to which they were to be removed. Removal Orders sometimes list all the children in the family and give their ages.

Amongst those who were affected by removal were thousands of Irish applicants in England. If, upon examination, it was found that they had no right of settlement, they could be deported from the nearest port back to Ireland, at the time part of the United Kingdom. Often, families were placed on boats to the port nearest their home parish, but they still may have had a journey of many miles after disembarking. They would have had to pay their own way as the English parish would only pay enough for them to get to Ireland, not for the entire journey back to their original home parish.


NB: I presume that these removal lists were originally sourced from the House of Commons Parliamentary Papers (http://parlipapers.proquest.com/parlipapers) collection, which is freely accessible via subscribing libraries across the UK. It should be noted that there are many such lists from the 1860s and 1870s in the archive, not just from England, but from Scotland and Wales also. You will find additional lists freely available on the Raymond's County Down website at http://countydown.x10.mx/html/index2.htm, as follows:
  • Return of all poor persons, removed from Scotland to Ireland 1867/1869
  • Return of all poor persons removed from England & Wales to Ireland 1867/1869
  • Return of poor persons, England & Wales since 1st Jan. 1875
  • Return of poor from Scotland to Ireland, 1875/76/77/78


Ireland, School Masters and Mistresses, 1826
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=61316

The Irish Education Inquiry published its second report in the year 1826, in Dublin, Ireland and aimed to provide a picture of the state of education in Ireland at the time. The stated goal of the commission was "To inquire into the nature and extent of the instruction afforded by the several institutions established for the purpose of education and maintained either in whole or in part from the public funds; to inquire also into the state of the diocesan and district Schools, and the Nature of the Instruction there given; for ascertaining whether any and what regulations may be fit to be established with respect to the Parochial Schools, and for reporting as to the Measures which can be adopted for extending generally to all classes of the People the benefits of Education." The report's findings were presented to the UK Parliament as Ireland was, as that time, part of the United Kingdom.

The report also included the names of Masters and Mistresses employed in schools at that time.

What can be found in the records?

For each Master or Mistress found within the report, you may be able to find (where available):

Their Name
The County in which they taught
The Parish in which they taught
The location of the school in which they were employed


Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Resignation from SCAN Ltd

Yesterday I submitted my resignation as one of the directors of the Scottish Archive Network Ltd, after four years in the role.

I've wished the Scottish Council on Archives (www.scottisharchives.org.uk) all the very best in trying to further plans for its proposed Scotland Online project, a replacement for the current SCAN catalogue (found at http://scan.org.uk/), which is in much need of updating and replacing. SCAN Ltd has previously contributed some funds towards trying to achieve this goal.

Until, and if, Scotland Online is eventually realised - in whatever form - SCAN remains the most useful platform currently to search for materials held in over 50 archives across the country. Note however, that it has not been updated in many years, and that in some cases, local archives now host their own online catalogues which may be more comprehensive - so always look to the local archive website also!

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Wednesday, 24 May 2017

Archives and elections

As someone who recently stood (and failed!) for election to my local government authority, I have certainly been made much more aware of a lot of activities to do with the electoral process and the rules of the Electoral Commission. One thing that never occurred to me however, was the role of local archives in the carrying out of elections, in particular within their immediate aftermath.

I've just received the latest newsletter from Highland Archive (https://www.highlifehighland.com/archives-service/), and in this there is a fascinating insight into its role on this front.

Most of the documentation from polling stations requires to be kept for a year in accordance with Electoral Commission regulations. This documentation includes the marked register used by the clerk at the polling station when they score off your name when you go to cast your vote, as well as the actual ballot paper you put your cross on in the polling booth. This year, as well as being on duty at the recent local elections, we will also be present at the forthcoming surprise General Election on 8th June to take custody of the documents. The work usually involves being present at the count overnight. We turn up about an hour before the polls close and we are there well after the count ends, because we have to pack all the counted ballot papers when the count staff leave and transport them to the Highland Archive Centre for safe keeping. In the event of a dispute regarding the election, these papers need to be available for scrutiny, so Records Management has an extremely important role to play.

For more on the archive's involvement, and to read the full newsletter, visit http://mailchi.mp/highlifehighland/highland-archive-service-newsletter-may-2017?e=36f4314bac.

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

UK archives and libraries security precautions

In the aftermath of the terrorist outrage in Manchester, England, on Monday, a quick note on security upgrades now in place at institutions across the country.

The National Records of Scotland (www.nrscotland.gov.uk) has tweeted the following:

We’ve increased our security at General and New Register House today – please bear with us as our team works to keep you safe.

Also in Edinburgh, the National Library of Scotland (www.nls.uk) Maps Collections department (@natlibscotmaps) has similarly tweeted the following:

Increased security at present means that large bags (backpacks, cases, etc) aren't allowed in our buildings. Thanks for your understanding.

The National Archives at Kew has also shared the following (http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/about/news/additional-security-measures-at-the-national-archives/):

In response to the horrific terrorist attack in Manchester the government terrorist threat level has been raised to Critical, meaning that an attack is expected imminently.

The National Archives will open as normal and will operate a full service, however additional security measures will be in place. Visitors are asked to remain vigilant and report any concerns or suspicious activity to a security officer or member of staff.

Our thoughts remain with the families and loved ones of the victims, the injured, and everyone affected by the attack.

I have yet to see if any other institutions have similar precautions enacted, but I think if planning a trip to any archive or library at present anywhere in the UK, it might be worth checking if any additional security requirements have been put in place that might affect your visit.

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Tuesday, 23 May 2017

Appalling news from Manchester

The whole of the UK is in shock today, with the news that last night a suicide bomber detonated a nail bomb after a concert at the Manchester Arena in the city centre, killing at least 22 people, including children, and injuring dozens more.

My mother lived in Manchester for several years before passing away in 2013, and both my wife and I still have family living there today. I have always considered the city to be the jewel of England, and the response of everyday Mancunians last night was humbling to witness via social media and the broadcast news.

Last night's cowardly attack was a shocking and appalling incident. As someone who grew up in Northern Ireland during the Troubles, my heart goes out to all those who have been affected, and to whom I offer my sincere condolences.

With this being a genealogy news blog, the only relevant piece of associated news to bring you is that Manchester and Lancashire Family History Society has just tweeted that "Our @MLFHS help desk was open as usual today in Central Library and will be again tomorrow" (i.e. Wednesday).

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.