Saturday, 14 September 2019

FindmyPast adds Irish Boundary Commission Reports

The latest additions to FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk):


Irish Boundary Commission Records 1924-1925
The Irish Boundary Commission was set up to determine the boundary between the Irish Free State and Northern Ireland. Findmypast has digitised this collection of more than 47,000 records from The National Archives which include the Commission’s minutes, papers, correspondence and report of the Irish Boundary Commission, and records of oral and written evidence submitted to it.

Berkshire Marriages Index
Over 63,000 additional records have been added to 16 parishes across the county. The new additions consist of transcripts provided by the Berkshire Family History Society that may reveal your relative’s age, marital status, residence, occupation, father’s name and spouse’s details. Some records may also include the names of witnesses and additional notes.

Derbyshire Deaths and Burials
Over 23,000 Derbyshire Family History Society transcripts have been added for 12 cemeteries around the county. As well as revealing the final resting place of your ancestor, these records may also reveal their age at death, birth year, death year, burial date and if they died paupers. Some records may also list next of kin, allowing you to add new names to your growing family tree.

British In Ceylon Parish Records
From 1815 until 1948, Sri Lanka, formerly known as Ceylon, was a British colony. The 4,500 records in this collection span that period and have been collected and transcribed by the Kabristan Archives. They include the names of those who were serving in Ceylon and were married, died, or had children there. Over a thousand names of those who served in Ceylon during the First World War are also included.

International records update - Russia
Does your family tree have Russian roots? Search for your Russian ancestors in more than 325,000 baptisms, marriages and burials. These three indexes will provide you with essential names, dates and locations for expanding your Russian family tree.

British & Irish newspaper update
This week we have added 110,926 new pages to our collection. This includes two newspapers that cover the historic county of Dumfriesshire. Both weekly publications, the Eskdale and Liddesdale Advertiser was published in Langholm and the newspaper continues to this day, and the Galloway News and Kirkcudbrightshire Advertiser was published in Dalbeattie. Rounding off our trio of new Scottish titles this week is the Montrose Standard, another weekly title that was published in Angus. Founded in 1837, we have an extensive run of editions for this particular publication, numbering nearly 50,000 pages and so far spanning the years 1844 to 1957, representing over a century’s worth of local news coverage.

For further details, and links, visit https://www.findmypast.co.uk/blog/new/berkshire-derbyshire-irish-records

Chris

Order Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483. My next Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course starts 4 November 2019 - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

TheGenealogist expands its Education collection

TheGenealogist (www.thegenealogist.co.uk) has expanded its Education records collection:

New School and University Registers on TheGenealogist

As children go back to school, TheGenealogist has just released a diverse batch of school and university records to join its ever growing education collection.

Researchers can use this new data to find ancestors who attended or taught at a variety of Educational establishments between the 1830s and 1930s. Also listed are the names of those who held high office in the institutions, such as the patrons, deans, visitors, professors, masters in the case of universities and the principles and governors in the case of schools.

Use these records to add colour to a family story and glean important information from the biographical details to use in further research.

The list of records included in this release are:

St. Lawrence College Ramsgate Register, 1879 to 1911
Upper Canada College Address List 1829-1929
The Report Of The President Of Queen's College Belfast 1896-1897
The Glenalmond Register 1847-1929
Clifton College Register 1862-1912
Edinburgh Institution 1832-1932
King Williams College Register 1833-1904
The Bradfield College Register 1850-1923
The Old Denstonian Chronicle 1915
The Old Denstonian Chronicle 1916
The Old Denstonian Chronicle 1917
The Old Denstonian Chronicle 1918
The Old Denstonian Chronicle 1919
Isle of Man, King William's College Register 1833-1927
Ireland, The Campbell College Register 1894-1938
Eton College, Easter 1862
Keble College Register, 1870-1925
Rathmines School Roll, 1858-1899
Charterhouse Register 1911-1920 Vol. III
Cheltenham College Register 1841-1927
Alumni Carthusiani, 1614-1872

This expands our extensive education records collection.

Read our article:
https://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/featuredarticles/2019/find-ancestors-in-education-records-1180/


(With thanks to Nick Thorne)

Chris

Order Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483. My next Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course starts 4 November 2019 - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

PRONI to release new digitised records online

Just back from Belfast, where I attended the latest stakeholder meeting at the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (www.nidirect.gov.uk/proni) - and with some very exciting news!

For some time PRONI has been discussing making available through its online catalogue various digitised record sets. This already happens at the archive's search room in Belfast, where, for example, you can access various digitised church records collections (see https://www.nidirect.gov.uk/sites/default/files/publications/Church%20Records%20Available%20as%20Digital%20Copies%20in%20PRONI_0.pdf)

The plan now is to try to make several collections available for users to access from home in time for Explore Your Archive Week, towards the end of November. The collections being made available will include:

ED/1 National Education Commisioners Grant Aid Application ( 1832-1889)
From the PRONI catalogue:
In September 1831, the Commissioners of National Education were established to administer a fund of 30,000 per annum placed at the disposal of the Lord Lieutenant for the education of the poor in Ireland. They were empowered to make grants to local schools on condition that part of the required sum was raised locally and in addition they supervised the work of the schools, supplied textbooks and trained teachers. This class of records which bears the PRONI reference number ED/1, consists of 33 volumes of applications made to the Commissioners for grants for building schools, payment of teachers, provision of textbooks, equipment etc. The applications were made on printed questionnaire forms (occasionally accompanied by correspondence), which were filed and bound together in date order and arranged county by county. They cover the period 1832-1889. ED/1/1 to ED1/28, are available on microfilm and bear the reference number MIC/548, Reels 1 to 52. The National Archives in Dublin hold a few unbound applications from Counties Antrim, Armagh, Down, Fermanagh and Meath, as well as a volume of Rejected Applications from Ulster schools for the period 1868-72.

Tithe Applotment Books (Northern Ireland)
The books from the Republic are already available online at http://titheapplotmentbooks.nationalarchives.ie/search/tab/home.jsp. This collection from PRONI will not be presented in the same way, in that they will not be keyword searchable, but instead must be browsed by the relevant townland or parish (much more preferable, in that when browsing you can pick up on things that a keyword search may miss). They will be presented as large scale PDF documents, via a 'View digital object' button on the catalogue entries. PRONI will be adding to its site a how-to user guide to explain how to work through the collections. 

(NB: It is hoped these will be ready in time for the main launch, but they admit they are working to a tight deadline - nevertheless, if not ready by November, they are imminent)

Photo collections - various collections will be made available, including some gems such as circus photos, historic images from the Steeple estate in Antrim, and material from the Northern Ireland Photographic Association (formed 1967).

Hansard Papers - from the Northern Irish Assembly

Other news:

340 documents have been added to the Conflict Archive on the Internet (CAIN) covering the years 1991-1992. Plans are in place to add further records for 1993-94 over the next year.

State papers form 1995 have now been added to the site's catalogue. (535 fully open, 172 partially redacted, with 45 still closed to access).

I'll blog about forthcoming events on a separate thread.

But hey - the tithe records are coming online soon!



(With thanks to all at PRONI)

Chris

Order Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483. My next Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course starts 4 November 2019 - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Tuesday, 10 September 2019

Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course in November

It's still a couple of months away, but here are the details of my next forthcoming Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the Old Parish Registers (OPRs) course, starting 4 November 2019:

This is an intermediate level course in Scottish family history for those who are going back beyond 1850. You should have some experience with research in the Old Parochial Registers of the Church of Scotland and in using major websites for Scottish research. This course discusses sources that fill the gap when the OPRs are uninformative or missing; for example, records of parish and town administration, occupations, land transfer and taxation. Using these records involves several different locations. You will learn how to check online finding aids and how to find the most effective way to obtain records that may be online, in print, on CD or microfilm. This is the second course on Scottish research. If you have not taken Scottish Research Online please check its description.

Lesson Headings:

* Kirk Sessions records and parish poor
* Burgh records and town poor
* Occupations, taxation and early lists
* Land transfer and the value of sasines
* Land, inheritance and estates

Each lesson includes exercises and activities; a minimum of 1 one-hour chat session per week. See How the Courses Work.

STUDENTS SAID: "well structured chats with opportunities for questions as well"

Relevant Countries: Scotland
Course Length: 5 Weeks
Start Date: 4 Nov 2018
Cost: £49.99


The following video also gives a bit more of a flavour about what to expect:



(Available also at https://youtu.be/1vX6GZtwZJ0)

For further details, and to sign up, please visit https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302.

I'll hopefully see you there!

Chris

Order Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483. My next Scottish Research Online course starts 2 September 2019 - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Monday, 9 September 2019

RootsTech London adds further keynote speaker

Following criticism recently of the announced keynote panel for Rootstech (https://britishgenes.blogspot.com/2019/08/rootstech-london-announces-keynote.html), there has been a further announcement from the organisers:

LONDON (9 September 2019), RootsTech London 2019, the world’s largest family history convention, is pleased to announce Kadeena Cox, Paralympics double gold medalist, as the featured keynote speaker on Friday, 25 October 2019, at Excel London. Boasting 150+ classes, one-on-one coaching corners, and an exhibition hall filled with the latest in genealogy and technology, RootsTech London is the perfect place to discover and celebrate family stories. RootsTech London 2019 runs 24–26 October 2019. Find out more at RootsTech.org/London.

Kadeena Cox is an accomplished professional Paralympic athlete. She is perhaps best known for being the first British athlete in 32 years to take gold in two sports at the same Paralympic games. Cox has competed in a variety of sports since an early age. In 2014, she was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) but did not let that stop her from achieving excellence in her life. She went on to win two gold medals and a bronze medal at the Rio 2016 Summer Paralympics. Cox has broken records, won world titles, and represented her country well in her notable accomplishments as a professional athlete.

“We are thrilled to have Kadeena at RootsTech. Her inspiring story of determination, perseverance, and drive for success will be a fitting message for the RootsTech audience,” said Jen Allen, event director. “RootsTech is all about celebrating stories, and there aren’t many stories more inspiring than Kadeena’s. Winning two gold medals in the Paralympics in different sports and overcoming some of the challenges she’s dealt with is simply incredible. We can’t wait to hear from her on stage.”

Cox will join previously announced keynote speakers and performers Donny Osmond, Dan Snow, Steve Rockwood, and Tre Amici, with Dr. Nick Barratt hosting as emcee.

Classes

RootsTech London 2019 will offer 150+ classes and activities for families and individuals with a variety of interests and skills. Select classes will be broadcast online. Learn more or register for the event at RootsTech.org. Passes start at only £49.

(With thanks to RootsTech News via email - for details of RootsTech London, 24-26 October 2019, visit https://www.rootstech.org/london)

Chris

Order Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483. My next Scottish Research Online course starts 2 September 2019 - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Sunday, 8 September 2019

Ancestry releases Pembrokeshire and Bristol records

Ancestry has added several new collections for Pembrokeshire and Bristol.

Pembrokeshire, Wales, Electoral Registers, 1740-1978
https://www.ancestry.co.uk/search/collections/pembrokeshireelectoral/
Source: Electoral rolls for Pembrokeshire, Wales. Archifdy Sir Benfro - Pembrokeshire Archives, Haverfordwest, embrokeshire, Wales.

Bristol, England, Church of England Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1538-1812
https://www.ancestry.co.uk/search/collections/bristolparish/
Source: Bristol Church of England Parish Registers and Bishop Transcripts, Bristol Record Office, Bristol, England.

Bristol, England, Church of England Baptisms, 1813-1918
https://www.ancestry.co.uk/search/collections/bristolbaptisms/
Source: Bristol Church of England Parish Registers and Bishop Transcripts, Bristol Record Office, Bristol, England.

Bristol, England, Church of England Marriages and Banns, 1754-1935
https://www.ancestry.co.uk/search/collections/bristolmarriages/
Source: Bristol Church of England Parish Registers and Bishop Transcripts, Bristol Record Office, Bristol, England.

Bristol, England, Church of England Burials, 1813-1994
https://www.ancestry.co.uk/search/collections/bristolburials/
Source: Bristol Church of England Parish Registers and Bishop Transcripts, Bristol Record Office, Bristol, England.

Have fun!

Update: Just found a listing for my grandfather Ernest Graham in 1970 in the Pembroke records. He was killed in an accident just two years later in Milford Haven, before I ever got a chance to meet him. C'est la vie...

Chris

Order Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483. My next Scottish Research Online course starts 2 September 2019 - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

MyHeritage Education resource launches

From MyHeritage (www.myheritage.com):


We’re thrilled to introduce MyHeritage Education (https://education.myheritage.com): a new online resource center for enhancing your understanding of MyHeritage’s tools, products and services, and to help you make the most of your family history research.

At MyHeritage, we’re always striving to improve the user experience and to make genealogy research easy and intuitive. MyHeritage Education takes you step-by-step through the different MyHeritage features, providing you with a seamless understanding of the different tools available as you explore your family history on MyHeritage. It includes a wealth of educational materials that will help you learn about every facet of MyHeritage: articles, how-to videos, and webinars covering a wide variety of topics, including plenty of tips for everyone from beginner family history enthusiasts to seasoned genealogists.

MyHeritage Education is currently available in English, German, Dutch, French, Swedish, and Norwegian, and we will be adding new languages in the future. It is open to everyone and is free of charge. We will be adding new content to the site on a regular basis, so if there’s anything that you’d like to learn about, just let us know!

(With thanks to Daniel Horowitz)

Chris

Order Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483. My next Scottish Research Online course starts 2 September 2019 - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Saturday, 7 September 2019

FindmyPast clarifies source info for Scottish Catholic records

Yesterday I blogged that FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk) had updated its Scottish Catholic collections, but that no source information was present. With Catholic records also available on ScotlandsPeople, I was unclear if this was a further release from some other source, or the same collection, or an extension of material from the same source. Following my blog post I contacted FindmyPast and had an interesting exchange, where I was initially advised that if I looked at the transcripts, it would tell me that the source was the Bishops Conference of Scotland, of which the Scottish Catholic Archives is an agency. I replied that not having a current subscription, such info is not immediately accessible, and suggested that the main search pages should perhaps be updated instead.

I've just noticed that FindmyPast has now seemingly taken note of my suggestion, and has now updated the pages to reflect the source info, as follows:

Discover more about these records

This extensive collection of Roman Catholic marriages in Scotland consists of marriages from all eight Scottish dioceses: Aberdeen, Argyll & The Isles, Dunkeld, Galloway, Glasgow, Motherwell, St Andrews & Edinburgh, and Paisley. However, the collection is not exhaustive and does contain gaps. The following counties are missing from the records: Shetland, Berwickshire, Kincross, and Clackmannan. You can access greater detail about the parishes available in the Scottish Roman Catholic records in the Scotland Roman Catholic parish list available in the Useful links and resources section.

The sacramental records are provided by The Scottish Catholic Archives. Records begin as early as 1736 and continue until 1942. Due to data protection restrictions, we will only publish records which are more than 75 years old. Record keeping was the responsibility of the parish priest; therefore, the amount of detail recorded and the standard of registers can vary between parishes.

In 1538, the Roman Catholic Church was disestablished as the state religion in Scotland. This was the beginning of centuries of persecution and discrimination against Catholics. The practice of the Catholic faith was banned, and Catholics were excluded from public life. However, in spite of these restrictions, many retained their Catholic faith and practices. In 1694, Bishop Thomas Nicolson was appointed the first vicar-apostolic of Scotland by Pope Innocent X. The Bishop laid new foundations for the Catholic Church in Scotland. In 1793, The Relief Act lifted the restrictions on Catholic worship in chapels and granted permission for Catholics to own and inherit land. Full Catholic emancipation culminated in 1829 with the removal of the remaining restrictions against Catholics, such as taking a seat in Westminster. 

That's a bit more like it! Individual parishes are selectable from the relevant drop down menu option.

(With thanks to FindmyPast)

Update: there is a stil an error in there - the Scottish Reformation was in 1560, not 1538! Have emailed them again...

Chris

Order Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483. My next Scottish Research Online course starts 2 September 2019 - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Friday, 6 September 2019

More Scottish Catholic records added to FindmyPast

The latest releases from FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk):


Scotland Roman Catholic Parish Baptisms
Over 236,000 additional records covering 146 parishes have been added to our collection of Scottish Catholic baptisms. Each result includes both a transcript and an image of the original document that will reveal a combination of your ancestor’s birth date, baptism date, baptism place and parents' names. Images may also reveal the names of godparents or sponsors as well as additional comments.

Scotland Roman Catholic Parish Marriages
A further 129,000 Scottish Catholic marriages are also available to search. These transcripts and images reveal when and where your ancestor was married as well as the names of their spouse and father. Images will often reveal additional details such as the names of witnesses and couple’s residences.

Scotland Roman Catholic Parish Burials
Discover where your Catholic ancestors were laid to rest with over 16,000 additional burial records. All of this week’s Scottish Catholic additions are exclusive to Findmypast and cover 124 parishes across the country. As well as birth year, death date, burial date and location, images may reveal their marital status, cause of death or additional comments.

Scotland Roman Catholic Parish Congregational Records
Last but not least, a further 114,000 congregational records are now available to search. Covering all eight Scottish Catholic dioceses, this collection includes registers of confirmations and communion recipients, as well as parish lists, seat rentals, and lists of people who converted to Catholicism.

Yorkshire School Logs
Discover your Yorkshire ancestors who attended or were teachers in schools between 1862 and 1959. This new and exclusive collection of more than 137,000 transcripts allows you to explore their school records to find the year and the school they attended.

International records update – Portugal
Explore your Portuguese roots with three indexes to more than 570,000 transcripts of baptisms, marriages and deaths.

British & Irish newspaper update
This week sees 100,598 brand new pages joining The Archive, with updates to 14 of our existing titles, as well as five new titles joining our collection. Four new Scottish titles are now available to search; the Ayrshire Post, the Wishaw Press, the Irvine Herald and the North British Agriculturalist. This bi-weekly specialty title described itself as a ‘magazine of farming, gardening, forestry and rural economy.’ Rounding off our new publications for this week is another specialist title – Holmes’ Brewing Trade Gazette. This curious journal, published by one Joseph Holmes, a brewer’s chemist from Leeds, was a ‘monthly journal dedicated to the interests of Brewers, Publicans, Wine & Spirit Merchants.’

Further information and links at https://www.findmypast.co.uk/blog/new/here-is-whats-new-this-findmypast-friday

COMMENT: I've no idea what the source is for the Scottish Catholic records - have asked, and will update if I get a response.

Update: Just received a response saying "You can see the source at the bottom left of the transcription page. One I have found shows as © Catholic National Endowment Trust Charity No. SCO 16650 (known as The Bishops' Conference of Scotland). So check that section please."

The thing is, you can only actually access the transcription page if you have a subscription. I currently don't. I've suggested they perhaps indicate it on their search page!

Chris

Order Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483. My next Scottish Research Online course starts 2 September 2019 - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Thursday, 5 September 2019

MyHeritage Live lectures will be streamed

From MyHeritage (www.myheritage.com):

We are just a couple of days away from an exciting weekend in Amsterdam, and we are thrilled to announce that we will live stream the genealogy and DNA lecture tracks online throughout the conference!

The live stream will be available on the MyHeritage LIVE website (https://live2019.myheritage.com) and on the MyHeritage Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/myheritage), so please tune in from 9:00 a.m. Amsterdam time on September 7th. If you need help calculating the time difference to your local time zone, you can use https://www.thetimezoneconverter.com/.

Make sure to visit the conference website to see the full schedule.


Chris

Order Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483. My next Scottish Research Online course starts 2 September 2019 - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.