Friday, 30 September 2016

Family Tree Maker flash drive offer

Oh this isn't fair. I don't need this, but I want it - confound you Software Mackiev!!!

FTM appears in a flash!

Let's face it – fewer and fewer computers have disc drives these days. So we've created a distinctive alternative to DVD's for you. Our new 4GB FTM flash drive, made of natural wood, comes with a copy of the latest FTM installer on it. For those moving files between computers we've also included 2GB of storage space and our FTM Moving Kit that provides everything you need to open any FTM tree file ever created – all the way back to files from version 1.0 that came on floppy discs in 1989. The flash drive costs £15 plus £4.95 shipping (so £19.95 total). If you already have FTM 2014 or Mac 3 and you'd like an FTM flash drive to call your own, just visit the Replacement Center (see below) to order.


The Replacement Center is open.

We get requests just about every day from FTM users for replacement copies. Sometimes it's because they've had a hard drive crash and need to reinstall. Or they're just moving to a new computer and have lost their installation disc. Whatever the reason, our new Replacement Center is there to help. It's entirely online and open 24/7 so FTM 2014 and Mac 3 users can get a new link emailed to them day or night, 365 days a year. Without having to beg. Or even explain why they want it. And isn't that really how it ought to work anyway?


Getting to the Replacement Center

1. Go to support.familytreemaker.com
2. Click "for additional assistance" at the bottom of the page.
3. Click the Replacement Center tile.

(With thanks to Software Mackiev via email)

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Book offers from Ulster Historical Foundation

From the Ulster Historical Foundation (www.ancestryireland.com):

For those of you looking for your Ulster Ancestors before 1800 the Fighters of Derry is one of the best sources currently available.

First published in 1932 William R. Young's Fighters of Derry for decades been one of the most overlooked works on the Siege of Derry and as a local genealogical resource.

For information on those who were involved in the siege of Derry in 1689 and events during the Williamite War in general, Fighters of Derry is the best source available.

This important publication lists the names of some 1,660 individuals who defended Derry or were associated with William of Orange; for many of them brief biographical sketches are provided. This book provides a real insight into settler society, particularly in north-west Ulster, in the late seventeenth century. Also included in this book is a list of 352 Jacobites, again with biographical sketches for many of them.

This new edition has seen the index revised and substantially extended.

To order go to: www.booksireland.org.uk/store/all-departments/fighters-derry-deeds-descendants


Special Book Deal for those of you looking for pre-18th century ancestors

Priced at just £37.99 (RRP £47.97) this combination of books offer some of the best historical and genealogical texts relating to the 17th century.

For information on those who were involved in the siege of Derry in 1689 and events during the Williamite War in general, Fighters of Derry is the best source available. Men and Arms is essentially the first ‘census’ of English and Scottish settlers in the nine counties of Ulster and the Ulster Port Books is an underrated source for those interested in this period.

For more information please go to: http://www.booksireland.org.uk/store/all-departments/fighters-derry-men-arms


Complete Set of Ordnance Survey Memoirs

The Ordnance Survey Memoirs of Ireland provide a uniquely detailed history of the northern half of Ireland before the Great Famine. Learn not just about the houses of your ancestors, but the type of work they did, the schools they were educated in, the churches where they worshipped, the roads they got about on, and more.

For the first time ever get the complete set of memoir volumes (over 40 volumes) for just £129.99 (plus P&P) A saving over over £200! For more information please go to: http://www.booksireland.org.uk/store/all-departments/complete-set-volumes-1-40-ordnance-survey-memoirs?mc_cid=8dc3606f72&mc_eid=%5bUNIQID%5d.

Chris


For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Irish Famine Eviction Project

From the Irish Newspaper Archive (www.irishnewsarchive.com):

The Irish Famine Eviction Project is a study by Dr Ciaran Reilly to document evidence of evictions during the years of the Great Irish Famine. Dr Ciaran Reilly; author of several books on The Great Irish Famine is the chief coordinator for this extraordinary project. Dr Reilly’s vision is to create a dedicated online resource listing GPS coordinates for famine eviction sites and to create a better understanding of the actual people involved in the evictions. It is hoped that the Irish Famine Eviction Project will shed new light on numbers, locations and background stories of those involved. 500 Sites listed so far - see https://irishfamineeviction.com/eviction-map/.


We Need You!
Sponsored by Irish Newspaper Archives the project will use primary and secondary source information to research, gather and catalogue evictions. One of the goals is to collaborate with individuals, societies and libraries across the world. We are looking for any informaiton of evictions, locations and local folklore. To help researchers Irish Newspaper Archives are offering 30% of monthly and yearly membership. Discount code - IFP30

Profile: Dr Ciaran Reilly;
Dr Reilly author of several books has embarked an a project to help shed light on the number of people and locations of evictions that took place during the Great Famine. View his profile at https://www.irishnewsarchive.com/wp/dr-ciaran-reilly-irish-famine-research/

To submit your own research for inclusion in our project you can email your findings to famineeviction@gmail.com or tweet us @famineeviction

Irish Newspaper Archives are proud supporter of all Irish Research and to help any research into the Famine Evictions we are offering 30% of monthly and yearly membership valid till 31.10.2016
Code IFP30

(With thanks to Andrew Martin)

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

British Army Worldwide Index 1851 added to FindmyPast

Latest additions to Findmypast (www.findmypast.com):

British Army, Worldwide Index 1851

The British Army Worldwide Index 1851 contains over 156,000 records and index and covers over 300 regiments serving around the world.

A wide range of ranks is represented from privates and drivers to captains and lieutenants. The index was created by Roger E. Nixon using regimental muster books and pay lists, part of the War Office records, held at The National Archives. Each transcript will provide you with an archival reference from the original source and will reveal your ancestor's service number, rank, and regiment, as well as where his regiment was serving at the time the record was created.

The regiments in this collection were serving in Malta, Hull, West Indies, Ireland, Pakistan, Canada, Honduras, and more places around the world. The index includes the names of 92 hired black labourers serving with the Corps of Military Labourers in Port Louis, Mauritius, as well as over 12,000 records from members of the Royal Artillery.


Billion Graves Cemetery Index

Records have been added to the following country pages:

Over 1,4 million new additions to the United States Billion Graves Cemetery Index
Over 110,000 new additions to the Canada Billion Graves Cemetery Index
Over 107,000 new additions to the Australia Graves Cemetery Index
Over 19,000 new additions to the England Billion Graves Cemetery Index
Over 16,000 new additions to the New Zealand Billion Graves Cemetery Index
Over 10,000 new additions to the Scotland Billion Graves Cemetery Index
Over 3,000 new additions to the Ireland Billion Graves Cemetery Index
Over 600 new additions to the Wales Billion Graves Cemetery Index


Warwickshire Burials

Over 1,000 records from Witton Cemetery in Birmingham (formally known as Birmingham City Cemetery) have been added to our collection of Warwickshire Burials. The entire collection now contains more 1.1 million records and includes monumental inscriptions from Clifton Road Cemetery in Rugby.

Further details are available on the Findmypast blog at https://blog.findmypast.com/findmypast-friday-2023253630.html

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Times of India travel notices from 1861 online

From the Families in British India Society (www.fibis.org):

Times of India arrival and departure notices for 1861 have been uploaded to the FIBIS database website. The data consists of 1974 arrivals and 1508 departures, a total of 3482 passengers.

Our thanks go to David Edge and his wonderful team of volunteers!

View Times of India departure and arrival notices (http://search.fibis.org/frontis/bin/aps_browse_sources.php?mode=browse_components&id=985)

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Thursday, 29 September 2016

More on the new ScotlandsPeople website

I've had a chance to have more of a play with the new ScotlandsPeople site at www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk and remain impressed with the new version of the site, although there are a few gremlins that need to be sorted out.

My initial concern when I saw some of the early design concepts last year was that the site might sacrifice the PC experience for the tablet experience, but in fact, I think they have found a happy compromise. There are seveal new features, some useful videos - and some new records, which is the key thing!

First up, the new records:
  • Divorce record (indexes)
  • Civil partnership records indexes
  • Civil partnership dissolutions indexes
  • Non-conformist presbyterian denominations indexes and images

The biggest is of course the last, with over 150,000 records added from the following denominations:
  • The Reformed Presbyterian Church
  • The Original Secession (or First Secession) Church
  • The Associate Synods (Burghers and Antiburghers, and the Auld Licht Burghers, New Licht Burghers, Auld Licht Antiburghers and New Licht Antiburghers)
  • The Relief Church
  • The United Secession Church
  • The United Presbyterian Church
  • The Free Church

(See http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/kirk-history.html for a quick history as to how they all came about!) 

Whilst a detailed list of actual churches and parishes featured from all denominations (including Church of Scotland and Roman Catholic) is availableon the site at https://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk/guides/church-registers#Parishes, there is no list of the year range for the nonconformist entries at present - only the general catalogue number for all of the records as noted by the National Records of Scotland. Some searches are also not returning results for records that I know to exist - for example, none of the baptismal entries for my Paton family are showing up in the Blackford Free Church records in the late 1860s and 1870s. So teething troubles would seem to be at play. Not all nonconformist records have been added yet - and most of those that are there are baptism registers for now. Kirk session records will be added in due course with a subscription option, rather than a credits option. For more on some early gremlins visit Fergus Smith's blog post at http://www.oldscottish.com/blog/september-29th-2016.


One thing that does seem to have gone completely in the new site, unless I have missed it, is the ability to view search results by way of a map as opposed to a list. This feature in the previous version of the site was something that many of my overseas Pharos courses students have often commented on as being useful.

There are some nice touches - I have no problem with the price increase to £7.50, because the balance is that index searches are now completely free, as are views of the Register of Corrected Entries records, though these unfortunately still remain searchable as a follow up to an initial find in a birth, marriage or death record, and not as a database in their own right (which would allow a second bite at the pie if an original register image was for some reason misindexed, which has happened to me in the past). The 1881 LDS Scottish census transcription is also now free to view (as are its English and Welsh equivalents on FamilySearch).

The help and support material I have read so far has been of a high standard, as you would expect from the NRS. So I remain very positive about the new site - let's just sort those teething issues out!

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Wednesday, 28 September 2016

Ancestry adds Newcastle upon Tyne electoral registers and German records

Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk) has added the following collection to its English records holdings:

Newcastle upon Tyne, England, Electoral Registers, 1741-1974
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=60918
Original data: Newcastle electoral registers. Tyne & Wear Archives, Newcastle upon Tyne, England.

Please note that no registers were produced during the war years 1916, 1917 and 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943 and 1944. In this collection, the registers for the years 1960-1964 are also missing.
Note: This index was created using text recognition software. Records were not transcribed.

For further details please visit the collection's web page.

If you have German ancestry, the following datasets have also been added:
  • Teltow-Fläming, Germany, Marriages, 1874-1923
  • Schwäbisch Hall, Germany, Deaths, 1876-1950
  • Mittweida, Germany, Marriages, 1876-1921
  • Altenburg, Germany, Births, 1874-1901
  • Teltow-Fläming, Germany, Births, 1874-1903
  • Mittweida, Germany, Births, 1876-1905
  • Schwäbisch Hall, Germany, Marriages, 1876-1922
  • Altenburg, Germany, Marriages, 1876-1920
  • Mittweida, Germany, Deaths, 1876-1950
  • Teltow-Fläming, Germany, Deaths, 1874-1968
  • Schwäbisch Hall, Germany, Church Baptisms, Marriages, and Burials, 1559-1829
  • Mittweida, Germany, Residence Registers, 1895-1905
  • Schwäbisch Hall, Germany, Births, 1876-1903

Further details at http://www.ancestry.co.uk/cs/recent-collections

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

New ScotlandsPeople website is launched

From ScotandsPeople (www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk):

NEW SCOTLANDSPEOPLE WEBSITE LAUNCHED BY NATIONAL RECORDS OF SCOTLAND



ScotlandsPeople - the website which helps people search for their Scottish ancestors online - has been revamped and relaunched with a new look and a number of new features.

National Records of Scotland (NRS) operates ScotlandsPeople, which has on average 3.4m site views a year and around 1 million unique users since its launch in 2002.

As part of the most extensive upgrade to the service since 2010, users will be able to search statutory record indexes including birth, death and marriage certificates for free for the first time. Users will now only be charged if they wish to view or download a record image.

The new site also features an improved web design which allows customers to access ScotlandsPeople across digital devices, and an enhanced search function which allows them to locate and view records with greater ease.

Chief Executive of NRS, Tim Ellis said:

“ScotlandsPeople is internationally recognised as the place to start any personal journey into Scottish ancestry. At National Records of Scotland, we’re excited about the new site and look forward to helping both budding and expert genealogists to find out even more about their heritage.”

“In addition, we’re keen to develop ScotlandsPeople further and will continue to engage with users and listen to their feedback over the coming weeks and months.”

The launch also marks the start of a new chapter for ScotlandsPeople in another important way; all customer relations will be undertaken in-house by NRS for the first time. Technical support for ScotlandsPeople is to be provided by international technology company CACI Limited. The previous site was built by FindMyPast Limited who ran ScotlandsPeople for 14 years.

Greg Bradford, Chief Executive of CACI Limited said:

“CACI is honoured that National Records of Scotland chose us to help them build their new integrated, secure website. 

“By putting the user at the centre of the design, NRS and CACI have been able to create an easy-to-use site that delivers fast and accurate search results. We hope the users agree that the new site delivers a richer and more seamless customer experience.”

Jay Verkler, CEO of Findmypast Limited said:

“Since the launch of Scotlandspeople back in 2002, Findmypast and NRS have helped millions of people learn more about their Scottish heritage and the service has garnered acclaim from genealogists from all around the world.

“We wish NRS every success in the future and will continue to maintain the strong relationship that has led to the development of this fantastic service.”





Notes for Editors:

The new website is separate from the records system used in the ScotlandsPeoples centre in Edinburgh and in the local history centres across Scotland

Customers will not be charged as they formerly were - to search an index relating to the Birth, Death and Marriage Register, Old Parish Register or Open Census records. Customers will not be asked to pay a fee until they wish to view an image.

The cost has increased from £7 for 30 credits to £7.50 for 30 credits. Thirty credits will enable customers to purchase 5 images at cost of £1.50 per image of a document.

The new charging structure allows free access to the record indexes for everyone.

ScotlandsPeople compares favourably to similar services provided by agencies in other parts of the United Kingdom; while births, marriage and death indexes are free to search in England and Wales, images are not available to view and customers have to purchase certificates at £9.25 per certificate.

National Records of Scotland (NRS) is a non-ministerial department of the Scottish Government. Our purpose is to collect, preserve and produce information about Scotland's people and history and make it available to inform current and future generations. Our work underpins the fabric of Scottish society: telling the story of our nation http://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/about-us/what-we-do.

About CACI Ltd

Established in 1975, CACI employs more than 850 staff in the UK and Europe providing business information systems to public and private sector clients. CACI Ltd is a wholly owned subsidiary of CACI International Inc., an IT services company publicly traded on the NYSE and employing over 21,000 staff across more than 120 offices globally. www.caci.co.uk

(With thanks to Richard Holligan)

COMMENT - LOTS to get to grip with here - including new nonconformist presbyterian records, divorce indexes, civil partnerships and dissolutions records which have been added, and a new pay structure. Will have a play and report back!


Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

PRONI stakeholder forum update

I was unfortunately unable to attend the most recent stakeholder forum at the Public Record Ofice of Northern Ireland (www.nidirect.gov.uk/proni), but I have been kindly sent the minutes from the meeting. The following are a few highlights from current developments of interest for family historians:

New accessions to PRONI include papers of the Belfast Naturalists Club (with cataloguing to commence in early 2017), and a smaller collection relating to the life of Samuel J Edgar and the York Street Flax Spinning Company (one of my lot worked there, should be a useful set to look up!).

A significant amount of cataloguing was completed in the summer months on the Londonderry Papers (D3099), and likewise, cataloguing is ongoing on the papers of the Irish Council of Churches (D4602).

The new GIS mapping application (see http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/2015/09/latest-news-from-proni-user-forum.html), which provides OS maps with historical information overlays, should be released imminently.

The archives new Rules and Fees legislation should come into force on 16th November 2016, though final approval has still be passed at the Assembly. This will be the first time that they have been revised since 2009, and amongst new changes there will be clearer rules, a Code of Conduct, and a new table of fees. Most significantly for users, photocopying will no longer be offered, with visitors allowed to use their own equipment to photograph documents, subject to signing a copying and declaration form. To be allowed to do this, users will have to sign an undertaking about copying and copyright awareness before any documents are issued.The facility to obtain high quality copies will still be available.

A conference with the Western Front Association is to be held on the 8th October 2016. A £10 admission fee will be charged by the WFA to cover lunch.

PRONI now has four terminals providing access to GRONI's Geni service, offeirng access to digitised civil registration birth, marriage and death records, up to the present day (unlike the online service, which has imposed closure periods for each category). See http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/2016/09/proni-search-room-offers-access-to.html for more on this story.

Finally, PRONI’s new Director is Maeve Walls.

(With thanks to Gavin McMahon)

Chris
 
For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Living DNA launches service

I've been asked to share the following press release from another new kid on the DNA block, Living DNA, at www.livingdna.com:

New DNA test offers people an HD view of their past

28th September 2016 - Somerset, UK

The world’s first DNA ancestry test which allows people to break down their British ancestry to any of 21 regions in the UK and see how their worldwide ancestry has evolved over history has been launched.

Living DNA has been developed in partnership with over 100 world leading genetics experts, including the team behind the People of the British Isles Study 2015 – the first fine-scale genetic map of the British Isles. The new platform is designed to give people the most accurate and detailed estimate of their extended family tree, stretching back thousands of years.

From a simple saliva mouth swab kit, the new test uses the latest DNA testing technology to analyse over 680,000 DNA ‘markers’, and unlock a person’s genetic code to their past. Instead of looking at pieces of DNA in isolation, Living DNA analyses distinct sections of ‘linked DNA’, and then matches those findings to latest academic research using sophisticated software.

Results are displayed on an interactive online platform, breaking down an individual’s ancestry to over 80 worldwide regions, including 21 UK regions – more than any other company.

In addition, Living DNA’s product is the only one of its kind which allows users to look back over multiple generations to see their ancestry throughout human history, and discover when they shared ancestors with people throughout the world. Most other ancestry tests only look at people’s recent family history, typically going back 4 or 5 generations at most.

David Nicholson, managing director of Living DNA, comments:

“Compared to other ancestry tests out there, Living DNA is like viewing your family history on a high definition TV. By combining the latest DNA testing technology with the most robust academic research, we can give users the most accurate picture of their estimated ancestry.”

The ability for people to explore how their extended ‘ancestry family’ has changed over time is a key feature of the new product, according to Mr Nicholson:

“Our understanding of where we come from as individuals depends entirely on how far back in history we look. Our goal is to put people’s past into context in a way that has never been done before, and let people view their ancestry throughout history, to show how everyone in the world is ultimately connected.”

One of the key academic collaborators Living DNA has worked with in developing its new test has been Dr Dan Lawson from the University of Bristol, one of the authors of The People of the British Isles Study 2015 – the first fine-scale genetic map of the British Isles.

Dr Lawson has been instrumental in helping to develop Living DNA’s ground-breaking software which can now match an individual’s DNA to one of 21 regions in the UK for the first time.

“This is a whole new approach to DNA ancestry testing, and it is highly personal,” explains Dr Lawson. “No other method – either in scientific literature or in the field of personal genomics – can identify the ancestry of a single person to the level of regions within the UK.”

Living DNA’s test itself is run on a custom-built “Living DNA Orion Chip”. It is one of the first bespoke DNA chips in the world to be built using the latest GSA technology from market leader Illumina, and tests over 656,000 autosomal (family) markers, 4,700 mitrochondrial (maternal) markers and 22,000 Y-chromosomal (paternal) markers.

A lifetime membership to Living DNA costs £120, including a swab kit, the DNA ancestry test itself and access to a personalised, interactive results platform. Test results typically take 8-12 weeks before they are available, and a bespoke coffee table book of the results costs an additional £39 plus postage and packing. A membership also includes free lifetime updates to people’s results as new ancestry research and population groups are added to the platform and as science evolves.
Quotes

"Compared to other ancestry tests out there, Living DNA is like viewing your family history on a high definition TV. By combining the latest DNA testing technology with the most robust academic research, we can give users the most accurate picture of their estimated ancestry."
David Nicholson, managing director, Living DNA

"Our understanding of where we come from as individuals depends entirely on how far back in history we look. Our goal is to put people’s past into context in a way that has never been done before, and let people view their ancestry throughout history, to show how everyone in the world is ultimately connected."
David Nicholson, managing director, Living DNA

"This is a whole new approach to DNA ancestry testing, and it is highly personal. No other method – either in scientific literature or in the field of personal genomics – can identify the ancestry of a single person to the level of regions within the UK."
Dr Dan Lawson, University of Bristol

COMMENT: The tests being carried out are for autosomal, Y-DNA and mitochondrial DNA tests. The press release says that they test "over 656,000 autosomal (family) markers, 4,700 mitrochondrial (maternal) markers and 22,000 Y-chromosomal (paternal) markers". The mitochondrial DNA follows the maternal line - mum's mother's mother's mother's  etc DNA. Y-DNA follows the paternal line, i.e. your surname line, the father's father's father's father's etc DNA. The autosomal test is for a type of DNA that you inherit from both parents, which can be useful for finding close matches within a few generations on either side. All have their uses. I've not taken the test, so have no idea how it compares to other suppliers such as FamilyTreeDNA or DNA Ancestry.

A minor gripe is that the company tells you they test across the British Isles, but keeps asking you in its video "how British are you?". Ahem...! (Stand down, Ireland, STAND DOWN!!!).

DNA guru Debbie Kennett (who knows more about these things than I ever will!) has a very favourable review of the test at http://cruwys.blogspot.co.uk/2016/09/living-dna-new-genetic-ancestry-test.html.

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.