Tuesday, 15 January 2019

North Staffordshire mining heritage to go online

The Chatterley Whitfield Friends group (http://chatterleywhitfieldfriends.org.uk) has won a £10,000 grant from Stoke-on-Trent City Council’s community investment fund to digitise thousands of photos, maps, artefacts and other documents which were abandoned following the collapse of Chatterley Whitfield Mining Museum in 1993.

As part of the project, volunteers from the group are also planning to film interviews with former miners to create an oral history. The last mine to close in the area was Silverdale in 1998.

For more on the story, visit the Stoke Sentinel story at www.stokesentinel.co.uk/treasure-trove-north-staffordshires-mining-2416769.

Chris

Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. For my Scottish and Irish themed books, visit https://britishgenes.blogspot.com/p/my-books.html. Further news content is published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Free MyHeritage webinar - Newspapers for Family Research

MyHeritage (www.myheritage.com) has a free webinar hosted online:

Webinar Playback: Newspapers for Family Research

Newspapers often include obituaries, birth, marriage, and death announcements, and plenty of other useful information. They can be a real treasure trove for anyone looking to learn more about their ancestors. In this compelling and highly-praised webinar hosted by Legacy Family Tree Webinars, MyHeritage expert genealogist Daniel Horowitz explains how to best search newspapers and describes the specialized MyHeritage newspaper matching technology. Daniel includes lots of tips of sources outside of MyHeritage as well. Don't miss this webinar.

To access the webinar visit https://familytreewebinars.com/download.php?webinar_id=714


Chris

Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. For my Scottish and Irish themed books, visit https://britishgenes.blogspot.com/p/my-books.html. Further news content is published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Monday, 14 January 2019

Dukes of Grafton papers accepted by UK Government in lieu of tax

From the National Archives in England (http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/about/news/allocation-of-papers-accepted-in-lieu-of-tax-2/):

Part of the archive of the Northamptonshire estates of the Dukes of Grafton has been accepted in lieu of tax by the government.

Notable material includes accounts, correspondence, deeds, estate maps, architectural drawings, and manorial records from the 17th to the 20th centuries.

Any library, record office or institution in the United Kingdom interested in acquiring the papers should contact Philip Gale, Head of Standards and Improvement, Archives Sector Development, The National Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 4DU (email asd@nationalarchives.gov.uk) for further particulars in the first instance.

Applications for allocation of this material must be received in writing at the same address by Friday, 22 February 2019.

COMMENT: For what it's worth, my self-employed tax return is due end of this month. If HMRC wants a copy of my family history as part payment, by all means, do drop me a note, happy to discuss! :)

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Scottish Research Online course starts March 11th

My next Scottish Research Online course starts on March 11th 2019, running for 5 weeks - here's the description!

Scottish Research Online (102)
Tutor: Chris Paton

Scotland was first to have major records digitized and offer indexes and images online. It has also been a leader in placing resource information on the World Wide Web. This course describes the major sites, the types of information and data that they offer, the forms in which databases are presented and how to analyze results. You will learn to lay the foundations for searching a family, how to select best resources and what to do next either online or in libraries and archives.
Lesson Headings:
  • Scotlands People, Family Search, Ancestry, FreeCen: content, comparison, assessment
  • Essential Maps and Gazetteers
  • Civil Registration and Census Research Online
  • Searching in Church of Scotland Registers Online
  • Scottish Wills and Inventories Online
  • Take It From Here

Note: it is recommended but not required that students in this course sign up for the basic search option, 30 units/seven days, at ScotlandsPeople (cost is seven pounds).

Each lesson includes exercises and activities; a minimum of 1 one-hour chat s See How the Courses Work.

STUDENTS SAID: "I particularly liked the fact that the course didn't just focus on the well-known BMD resources available, but on a much wider range of websites, including many which give extremely useful background information on the geography and history of the localities where our ancestors lived."

"a very knowledgeable Instructor"

Relevant Countries: Scotland

This course is offered twice annually.

Course Length: 5 Weeks
Start Date: 11 Mar 2019
Cost: £49.99

And for a wee video introduction, visit https://youtu.be/ssdYLlGtoHw or watch below!




To sign up to the course, please visit https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102

Note that the follow up course to this, Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs starts on May 13th - for further details on this, please visit https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302

Hopefully see you there!

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Look Online - Scottish Burial Records

The following article was first published in the now defunct Your Family Tree magazine issue 173 (September 2016):

Look Online: Scottish burial records

Whilst records for baptisms, births and marriages are relatively straightforward to locate in Scotland, information about burials can be somewhat more difficult to unearth. Thankfully a range of record types and finding aids available online can help to make the process a little easier. These include death records that note the date of burial, interment records within church created parish registers, records from local government authorities, and monumental inscriptions that describe basic details of a person's life and death, and possibly others interred within the same lair.

The civil registration of Scottish births, marriages and deaths commenced in January 1855. From 1855 to 1860, civil death records not only noted where and when a person had passed away, as well as the cause of death, but also the place of burial and the name of the undertaker responsible. The latter details were unfortunately no longer noted by registrars beyond this point, however, a record located in this period may still steer you towards a potential family burial ground where other relatives may have been buried in later years. Civil registration records for death are available online via the pay-per-view based www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk.

Prior to the civil registration era the churches were largely responsible for burials. The main Church of Scotland parish records prior to 1855 are also available on ScotlandsPeople, but there are several things to be aware of when using them. The first point to note is that despite several acts of the Kirk's General Assembly to instruct parishes to keep burial registers, most dragged their heels, with only about a third having any surviving records concerning interments. The oldest surviving registers are from Aberdeen, dating back to 1538.


In a small number of areas (usually the larger burghs) such records can be very detailed, noting the names of the deceased, ages, causes of death, and in some instances genealogical information, such as the name of a father. The majority, however, are not burial records at all, but the details of payments made for the hire of a mortcloth, used to drape over the coffin. These can sometimes be so vague – e.g. 'Widow Smith, 3 shillings' – that it may not even be possible to confirm that the entry is actually for the person to whom you think it might concern.

Additional kirk session records may have further details such as information about the purchase or 'feuing' of lairs, although these tend to anticipate future burials within, rather than record contemporary burials, which may ultimately not have happened as planned for. Kirk session registers have been digitised, and can be viewed at the National Records of Scotland (www.nrscotland.gov.uk) in Edinburgh, but have yet to appear online – it is intended, however, that they will make their way onto ScotlandsPeople in due course. Note that if a family member migrated away from his or her home parish, it was fairly traditional up to the 19th century to be returned to the parish of birth for burial, and so interment may not necessarily be near to where the deceased spent his or her final days.

The Church of Scotland was not the only church in town, however, with many nonconformist Presbyterian factions splitting off from it in the 18th and 19th centuries, as well as other denominations arriving on the scene separately. Many of their records are held at local repositories across the country, such as county record offices or university archives. To locate such records you will need to use online catalogues such as that of the National Records of Scotland or the Scottish Archive Network (www.scan.org.uk), and then visit the institution in question. ScotlandsPeople holds burial records for some Roman Catholic church registers, although coverage is sparse, with just 17,560 burials recorded from 1782-1959.

In addition to the records of church graveyards, municipal cemeteries were also established in much of the country from the 19th century, with some available in searchable databases online. Some pre-1855 burial records from Perth's Greyfriars Cemetery, for example, can be searched online at http://www.pkc.gov.uk/article/3887/Perth-burgh-burial-registers-1794-1855, with another page on the website hosting downloadable cemetery maps for much of Perthshire at http://www.pkc.gov.uk/article/15014/List-of-burial-grounds. In addition to several churchyard registers for Aberdeenshire and Angus, Deceased Online (www.deceasedonline.com) also hosts some records for municipal cemeteries located within the two counties, as well as cremation records from Edinburgh.

Some of the most useful collection of records for Scottish burials are those of transcribed monumental inscriptions, largely collected by members from family history societies across the country. These detail the names of the deceased, the years of birth and death, the names of additional family members buried in the same lair, and in some cases they may even carry short epitaphs. To assist with their location, the Scottish Association of Family History Societies has an extremely useful database available online, at www.safhs.org.uk/burialgrounds.asp, which lists some 3500 known burial grounds in Scotland. Each entry details whether monumental inscriptions have been recorded, if they have been published in any format, and if not, where the unpublished collections may be consulted. The largest collection of monumental inscriptions records in the country is held at the Scottish Genealogy Society at www.scotsgenealogy.com. Note that some family history societies have basic indexes on their websites to burials they hold, which can be consulted in book or CD format – the SAFHS website provides details for each group. Monumental inscription records for Aberdeenshire, Banffshire and Kincardineshire, as transcribed by the Aberdeen and North East Scotland Family History Society, have recently been added to FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk).


There are additional online resources for gravestone inscriptions. A team from Scottish Monumental Inscriptions (www.scottish-monumental-inscriptions.com) is regularly touring around the country to photograph and transcribe headstones, with the records available to purchase on CD, or by download from the site – many of these can also be purchased from the Deceased Online website. Other useful index based sites for burials include Highland Memorial Inscriptions (https://sites.google.com/site/highlandmemorialinscriptions/home), which has records from much of the Highlands, including major cemeteries such as Tomnahurich in Inverness; Find a Grave in Scotland (www.findagraveinscotland.com), with holdings from across the country; and Memento Mori (www.memento-mori.co.uk), with records from Glasgow and much of the Central Belt. Some previously published records, such as interments from Aberdeenshire and Edinburgh, can be found also on Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk), within its UK Parish Baptism, Marriage and Burial Records collection, whilst the Friends of Dundee City Archives (www.fdca.org.uk) hosts several burial collections including one for Dundee's Howff Cemetery and another for Broughty Ferry.

Finally, many Scots also died in times of war. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission website at www.cwgc.org records the known burials of, or places of commemoration for, soldiers killed in both world wars. In addition, original records describing the interment process are also now available for many of those commemorated on the site, noting inscriptions to be added to headstones, and the next of kin with whom the Commission was liaising at the time. Photographs of many of the memorials in Scotland commemorating their sacrifice have been photographed by the Scottish War Memorials Project, and can be freely accessed at http://warmemscot.s4.bizhat.com.

Note that additional resources for Scottish burials can be found on gateway websites such as Cyndi's List (www.cyndislist.com) and GENUKI (www.genuki.org.uk).

(c) Chris Paton


For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Sunday, 13 January 2019

National Archives has January book sale

The National Archives in England (www.nationalarchives.gov.uk) is holding a book sale this January, with up to 70% off on certain titles.

To view the titles available, visit http://bookshop.nationalarchives.gov.uk/11/Bargains-and-offers/.


Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Saturday, 12 January 2019

APG free webinar series for 2019

The Association of Professional Genealogists (https://www.apgen.org) is running a series of free webinars.

Are you interested in a possible career as a professional genealogist? Want to learn how the pros approach genealogy research or tackle tough ethical situations? The APG's live webinars are open free to the public.

The lists of webinars is available at https://www.apgen.org/webinars/, with the first having an Irish flavour:

Share, Connect & Grow: Developing a Content Strategy for Your Genealogy Interests
Presenter: Laura Colleran
Monday, January 21, 2019
2:00p.m. EST

Registration required: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6872865061397542145

Being 'found' on the internet is rarely pure happenstance. It is likely that a person is looking for something specific (content) and undertakes a unique digital journey to find it. Creating content that enables you to engage with your target audience in a meaningful way is a key element of any modern digital marketing strategy. Storytelling, testimonials, partnerships, blogs and guest writers are all part of the content creation plan implemented by Ireland Reaching Out in recent years. This webinar will include information about developing the plan, creating the content, and promoting it online.

About the Presenter: Laura Colleran is the Programme Manager with Ireland Reaching Out, an Irish Diaspora engagement programme, funded by the Department of Foreign Affairs and the Heritage Council of Ireland. A previous member of the Irish Diaspora herself, she moved back to Ireland in 2013, having lived and worked in Italy for 11 years. Her professional background is in advertising and marketing, and she has worked with Ogilvy & Mather, Leo Burnett and Coca-Cola. She has also lectured marketing and brand management at the Institute of European Design in Turin.

NB: For more on Ireland Reaching Out visit https://www.irelandxo.com

(With thanks to the latest Irish Family History Centre Newsletter via email)

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

IrishGenealogy provides civil records update

The IrishGenealogy website (www.irishgenealogy.ie) has provided an update on the further upload of historicIrish based birth, marriage and death records at www.irishgenealogy.ie/en/news/154-update-to-the-civil-records-3:

We are pleased to advise that in early 2019, an additional 2 years of records of births, marriages and deaths will be added to the www.irishgenealogy.ie website. The marriage Index data along with additional images will also be updated for the years 1864-1869 inclusive.

The years covered by the release of the historic records of Births, Marriages and Deaths after this update will be:

Births: 1864 to 1918

Marriages: 1864* to 1943

Deaths: 1878* to 1968

* The General Register Office will continue to work on updating further records of Marriages dating back to 1845 and Deaths dating back to 1864. These will be included in future updates to the records available on the website.

The General Register Office is dealing with the feedback on the records – where records required correction this will be included in this updated release. Further details of this release will be confirmed early in 2019.

(With thanks to Claire Santry @Irish_Genealogy)

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Volunteers sought for Cupar burgh records transcription project

From Fife Family History Society (https://fifefhs.org):

Hidden Burgh: restoring Cupar’s place at the heart of Fife” HELP NEEDED
25 January @ 2:00 pm

The University of St Andrews are involved in the Archives Revealed project “Hidden Burgh: restoring Cupar’s place at the heart of Fife”. It is being financed largely by the Archives Revealed funding programme from The National Archives and the Pilgrim Trust, and will last for one year. The University holds the records for the Cupar Burgh from 1364 to 1975 and the objective is to have them fully catalogued so that they are accessible to everyone. Part of the project involves engagement with the Cupar community, giving the local people the opportunity to be part of the project. With that in mind, the University is looking for volunteers who are interested in being involved in some indexing/transcription projects. It is anticipated that the volunteers will work in a group setting at the Cupar Library using copies of the original records.

If you are interested in being part of this exciting venture, please come along to a meeting at the Cupar Library (Room 14) on Friday 25th January at 2 pm. The Cupar project archivist, Christine Wood, will explain what types of projects are available and what is involved. Anyone who would like to learn more and is keen to take part will be warmly welcomed. If you are not able to attend the meeting on the day but wish to be considered for the volunteering projects, please contact Christine Wood at caw23@st-andrews.ac.uk or telephone 01334 461727/462339.

(Original post at https://fifefhs.org/event/hidden-burgh-restoring-cupars-place-at-the-heart-of-fife-help-needed/)


Further information about the project can be found from the Universaty of St Andrews at https://news.st-andrews.ac.uk/archive/hidden-burgh-restoring-cupars-place-at-the-heart-of-fife/, and from project archivist Christine Wood at https://standrewsrarebooks.wordpress.com/2018/12/06/hidden-burgh-restoring-cupars-place-at-the-heart-of-fife/.

(With thanks to Fife FHS)

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Norfolk Record Office to offer reduced service?

Norfolk County Council has announced proposals to reduce the level of its Norfolk Record Office (www.archives.norfolk.gov.uk) service by one day's closure a week, with reduced hours for the remaining four, as well as one Thursday late opening a month instead of late Thursday opening every week. Further cutbacks are proposed for for educational work, volunteering opportunities and staffing.

A recent cosultation was held at the end of 2018 with details of the proposed changes (https://norfolk.citizenspace.com/consultation/nro/). It stated:

The use of our services, particularly by those becoming older, is growing every year. Demand is rising but the amount of money we receive from central government is declining; we now receive £204 million less each year, compared to 2011/12, and this is also expected to fall to zero by 2020/21.

For more on the story visit https://www.edp24.co.uk/news/politics/norfolk-record-office-opening-hours-and-staff-cutbacks-1-5845874.

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.