Sunday, 18 August 2019

The Men Behind The Glass Exhibition at PRONI

Details of a talk and exhibition at PRONI (www.nidirect.gov.uk/proni) on Tuesday 20th August 2019:

The Men Behind The Glass Exhibition

PRONI is delighted to host a lunchtime talk on the Men Behind the Glass exhibition and project on 20 August, 1.00 pm to 2.00 pm.

PRONI will be hosting a travelling exhibition curated by Campbell College this summer. The exhibition features many former Campbellians including First World War participants such as Lieutenant Edmund De Wind VC. Subjects include, Pre-War Campbell, life at Campbell, Campbellians at War, Campbell’s Contribution and Commemorating. The exhibition will be on display from 19 August to 27 September.


(With thanks to Gavin McMahon)

Chris

Order Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483. My next Scottish Research Online course starts 2 September 2019 - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Latest additions to FindmyPast

The latest additions to FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk):


Manchester, Peterloo Witnesses and Casualties, 1819
Discover if your English ancestor witnessed or was injured during the Peterloo Massacre which occurred on 16 August 1819 at St Peter’s Field, Manchester. The records show whether a person was injured and how; such as, “right elbow and head cut severely”. It also includes witness statements like, “saw constables hitting [John] Lees with truncheons and a broken flagpole. Addresses, occupations and additional notes are also included in many transcripts.

Maryland, Wills and Probate Records
Do you have ancestors’ from Maryland? Search this collection of Wills and Probates to find out the date of their Will. As confirmed in the introduction of the publication, the Maryland Calendar of Wills was compiled in response to an already “long existent and steadily increasing need for such work, a need not only of genealogists, nor only for Marylanders now living in the State, but also for the large class of persons, whose ancestors are to be numbered among the men and women who took part in the nation-building as begun on Maryland shores, and whose descendants are now to be found in every State of the Union.”

Maryland, Index To Colonial Probate Records, 1634-1777
Search this index to more than 107,000 probate records from 1634 to 1777 for transcripts and images of both Prerogative Court and County records. The amount of information listed in each record will vary but looking at images is always recommended.

Britain, Knights Of The Realm & Commonwealth Index
Over 14,000 additional records have been added to the Knights of the Realm & Commonwealth Index.

International Records Update - Hungary Baptisms 1734-1895
Discover if your ancestors were baptised in Hungary. Search through 14,000 records from the Hungarian baptism index to find out. The records were created through the International Genealogical Index and will generate hints against your Findmypast family tree.

British & Irish Newspaper Update
This week we have added 123,844 brand new pages. We have two new titles covering the Moray area, namely the Forres News and Advertiser and the Northern Scot and Moray & Nairn Express. Our third new Scottish newspaper is the Renfrewshire Independent, for which we have so far published the years 1858 to 1877. Our final new addition this week is the Devon Valley Tribune. Published in Tillicoultry, Clackmannanshire, we have an impressive run of pages for this title, ranging from the end of the 1890s right up until the 1950s.

Further details at https://www.findmypast.co.uk/blog/new/new-records-covering-maryland-knights-of-the-realm

Chris

Order Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483. My next Scottish Research Online course starts 2 September 2019 - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Thursday, 15 August 2019

TheGenealogist adds Charles Booth's London poverty maps

From TheGenealogist (www.thegenealogist.co.uk):

TheGenealogist’s Map Explorer adds the Charles Booth Poverty Maps of London

TheGenealogist’s innovative Map Explorer, which allows family history researchers to trace an ancestor’s property and then view the changing environment over time, now boasts another powerful new feature.

While previously researchers were able to view the georeferenced Lloyd George Domesday Survey Data Layer of maps and also see the sites of UK War Memorials, cemeteries and churchyards from across the country, TheGenealogist has now added the fascinating Booth Poverty Maps of London 1898-1899 to this useful resource.

● Use the new Charles Booth Maps to reveal London streets classified by income and class

● Research neighbourhoods where different classes of people lived close to each other

● Use the opacity slider to view various modern day maps as a base layer to see the area today

There were seven classifications detailed on Booth Maps ranging from the lowest to the wealthy. Those streets coloured black were for the ‘Lowest classes. Vicious, semi-criminal’. Next was dark blue for the ‘Very poor, casual. Chronic want’. This was followed by light blue to indicate ‘Poor. 18s to 21s a week for a moderate family’. Streets in purple indicated ‘Mixed. Some comfortable others poor’. Those roads in pink were ‘Fairly comfortable. Good ordinary earnings’. Red designated a street inhabited by the ‘Middle class. Well to do’, while yellow the ‘Upper-middle and upper classes. Wealthy.’

Diamond subscribers to TheGenealogist are able to use the interface by clicking on the large map of England, Scotland and Wales on the main search page.


The next screen allows the researcher to enter major street names or an area so that you can browse the locality.

In the recent BBC 1 Who Do You Think You Are? episode, Oscar winning actress Kate Winslet was researching her 2x great-grandfather, a Swedish born tailor, who lived in Great Pulteney Street, Westminster. Using this example we start typing Great Pulteney into the search box. We are presented with a choice of two from which we select the one that is in the City of Westminster, Greater London. Under Map Layers we chose the ‘Historic – Middle Layer’ and here select the ‘1898-1899 Charles Booth’s London’ from the dropdown menu. This will now highlight the street on the map.

TheGenealogist’s powerful Map Explorer has been developed to view these georeferenced historic maps overlaid on top of modern background maps including those from Ordnance Survey and Bing Street maps, as well as a satellite view. With the Map Explorer you can search for an ancestor's property, discovering its site, even if the road has changed or is no longer there.

See our featured article on Kate Winslet’s episode of Who Do You Think You Are? where she makes use of the Booth Maps in her research: https://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/featuredarticles/2019/who-do-you-think-you-are/kate-winslet-1156/

Find out more at www.TheGenealogist.co.uk/maps/

(With thanks to Nick Thorne)

Chris

Order Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483. My next Scottish Research Online course starts 2 September 2019 - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Wednesday, 14 August 2019

Flooding reveals graveyard bones in Fife

The BBC and STV have reported that heavy rain on Saturday has caused a wall to collapse at Largo and Newburn churchyard in Upper Largo, Fife, with several historic lairs exposed, and with some bones washed onto the adjacent street.

The head of Fife Council's bereavement services, Liz Murphy, is quoted as saying "Unfortunately, some historic graves were disturbed and exposed. In order to preserve the dignity of the deceased, where safe, the remains have been moved into the church.Any exposed ancient lairs are covered until it is safe to restore or rebury them."

You'll find the story at https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-edinburgh-east-fife-49344842 and https://stv.tv/news/east-central/1439974-human-bones-washed-onto-street-after-graveyard-floods/.

Fife News has further coverage at https://www.fifetoday.co.uk/news/bones-wash-out-onto-fife-road-after-church-wall-collapses-1-4981693.

Chris

Order Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483. My next Scottish Research Online course starts 2 September 2019 - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

RootsTech London announces keynote speakers

From RootsTech:

Salt Lake City, Utah (14 August 2019), RootsTech, the world’s largest genealogy convention and hosted by FamilySearch, is coming to London, October 24–26, at the ExCeL London. The RootsTech London keynote speakers and entertainers include Donny Osmond, Nick Barratt, Dan Snow, Tre Amici, and Steve Rockwood. Boasting 150+ classes, one-on-one coaching corners, an exhibition hall filled with the latest in genealogy and technology, RootsTech London is the perfect place to discover and celebrate family stories.


Keynote Speakers

RootsTech London 2019 begins Thursday, 24 October. Classes will cover a wide variety of topics, including first steps on your genealogy journey, DNA in genealogy, preservation tools, archival research, and more. Dr. Nick Barratt, a former genealogy consultant for Who Do You Think You Are?, will host and emcee the convention.

Dan Snow, popular historian, broadcaster, and television presenter, will be the featured keynote speaker on Thursday, 24 October, at 11:00 A.M. GMT. Snow was born and raised in London. Having graduated Oxford University, he went on to present military history programs with his father, Peter Snow. Their series Battlefield Britain won a BAFTA award. He has appeared regularly on the ONE show on BBC1 and has contributed to several books, including Death or Victory; The World’s Greatest Twentieth Century Battlefieldsand The Battle of Waterloo Experience.

On Friday, 25 October, at 11:00 A.M. GMT, Steve Rockwood, CEO of FamilySearch International, and Nick Barratt will address the audience as featured keynote speakers. Nick Barratt is known for his work on Who Do You Think You Are?, House Detectives, Hidden House Histories, Secrets from the Attic, and Missing Millions. He has authored several books, including Lost Voices from the Titanic, The Forgotten Spy, and The Restless King.In 2016 he was made an Honorary Associate Professor of Public History at the University of Nottingham. He is a committee member for the Community Archive and Heritage Group, and President of the Federation of Family History Societies.

Friday night at 6:00 P.M. GMT, RootsTech will host the talented singing trio, Tre Amici—an international classical pop trio made up of Leroy Vickers, Michael Thomas, and Martin Jackson. Tre Amici combines a moving combination of operatic arias, contemporary ballads, and classical theater.

Donny Osmond will grace the stage on Saturday, 26 October, at 11:00 A.M. GMT. Osmond’s successful career as an entertainer has spanned 5 decades. He is known internationally for his talent as a singer, songwriter, actor, television series host, and best-selling author. Osmond has performed since the age of 5 in such productions as The Andy Williams Show, The Osmonds, Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, and most recently with his sister in their Vegas show Donnie and Marie. “I’m really looking forward to RootsTech London,” said Osmond. “The United Kingdom is like a second home to me.”

Classes

RootsTech London 2019 will offer 150+ classes and activities for families and individuals with a variety of interests and skills. Select classes will be broadcast online. Learn more or register for the event at RootsTech.org. Passes start at only £49.

Further information on Rootstech London at https://www.rootstech.org/london

UPDATE: I'm sharing this tweet from US genie Megan Smolenyak in response to this post, because, actually, I wholeheartedly agree:

Must do better...

(Cheers Megan!)

Chris

Order Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483. My next Scottish Research Online course starts 2 September 2019 - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Monday, 12 August 2019

Lanarkshire Local and Family History Show 2019

The Lanarkshire Local and Family History Show will be taking place in early October:


Lanarkshire Family History Society
presents
Scotland's Largest Local & Family History Event​
9:30am - 4:30pm
Back again this year on Saturday 5th October 2019
Motherwell Concert Hall, Windmillhill Street, Motherwell, ML1 1AB
Entry £2.00 (Accompanied Children Free)
Talks cost £3 each - £10 for all 4 talks (Pay at the venue)
Enquiries - Email secretary-lanarkshirefhs@hotmail.co.uk

Further details are available at https://lfhsshow.weebly.com, including speakers at the event - I'll be amongst them speaking about an Irish house history.

Hopefully see you there!

Chris

Order Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483. My next Scottish Research Online course starts 2 September 2019 - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Saturday, 10 August 2019

British Newspaper Archive summer sale

The British Newspaper Archive (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) is holding a summer sale until 18 August, with a 30% discount on offer for a 12 month subscription.


For further details visit https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/account/subscribe?PromotionCode=BNA30SUMMER

Chris

Pre-order Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) for just £11.99 at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Latest FamilySearch additions

Added to FamilySearch (www.familysearch.org) - the number of new indexed records in each collections is stated in brackets at the end of each listing:

Australia Australia, Victoria, Inward Passenger Lists, 1839-1923 (164,023)
Austria Austria, Vienna Population Cards, 1850-1896 (22,532)
Brazil Brazil, Bahia, Passenger Lists, 1855-1964 (1,166,675)
Germany Germany, Baden, Church Book Duplicates, 1804-1877 (18,522)
South Africa South Africa, Netherdutch Reformed Church Registers (Pretoria Archive), 1838-1991 (846,630)
United States Kansas State Census, 1915 (50,854)
United States United States, Freedmen's Bureau Hospital and Medical Records, 1865-1872 (51,238)
United States Alabama, Confederate Pension Applications, ca. 1880-1930's (18,382)

Chris
 
Pre-order Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) for just £11.99 at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Forces War Records adds RAF records 1918-1975

From Forces War Records (www.forces-war-records.co.uk):

We now have added over 1.5 million NEW Royal Air Force Records from 1918 to 1975 for you to search.

Forces War Records UK based team of experts has now transcribed a nominal roll of other ranks – both male and female who served in the Royal Air Force.

Records in this collection are likely to include the following:

Surname
First Name
Service Number
Maiden Names or Aliases
‘Enlisted after’ date
Place of Enlistment
Trade
Nationality

Don’t worry if your ancestor didn’t serve in the Royal Air Force. Forces War Records has over 22 million Military records and an exclusive online Historic Library with over 2,000 publications for you to search.

* To search the new RAF records visit this link.


(With thanks to Jane Williams)

Chris

Pre-order Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) for just £11.99 at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Over 400 Scottish Published Family Histories added to FindmyPast

Just added to FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk):


Scotland, Published Family Histories
Is your family from Scotland? Discover more about your Scottish families' name and history from this collection of publications. There are over 400 publications in this collection of Scottish family histories.The publications mostly date from the 19th and early 20th centuries, they include memoirs, genealogies, and clan histories. There are also publications that have been produced by emigrant families.

(Note: Click on the Browse button on this page to see a list of all publications)

Scotland, Glasgow & Lanarkshire Death & Burial Index
Over 37,000 records have been added to the Glasgow & Lanarkshire Death & Burial Index. These new additions cover Bent Cemetery in Hamilton and consist of transcripts of original documents that will reveal a combination of your ancestors' birth year, death and burial dates, age at death, burial place and mortcloth price.

United States, Passenger and Crew Lists
Over 777,000 new records from the major port city of Baltimore in Maryland have recently been added to these passenger and crew lists.

Middlesex Monumental Inscriptions
Over 5,000 additional records are now available to search. The new records cover two cemeteries in Teddington as well as the Parish of St Mary's in Sunbury.

British & Irish Newspaper Update
Historical newspapers hot off the press this week include:

Hawick Express covering the years 1892, 1903-1904, 1913-1914, 1919-1940, 1950-1952
Coatbridge Express covering the years 1885-1951
Dalkeith Advertiser covering the years 1869-1953
Barrhead News covering the years 1897-1912
Banffshire Herald covering the years 1893-1912
Banffshire Advertiser covering the years 1881-1902, 1905-1912

Plus, we've added even more coverage to these papers:

Aberdeen Press and Journal – 1991 added
Aberdeen Evening Express – 1991 added
The Queen - 1901-1904 added

Further details at https://www.findmypast.co.uk/blog/whats-new/new-records-from-scotland-middlesex-and-baltimore

Chris

Now on sale - Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Friday, 9 August 2019

Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) now on sale

That thing where you come home and find that the postie has been! Now on sale - Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd edition), by yours truly...



Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd edition)

In this, the fully updated second edition of his bestselling guide to researching Irish history using the internet, Chris Paton shows the extraordinary variety of sources that can now be accessed online. Although Ireland has lost many records that would have been of great interest to family historians, he demonstrates that a great deal of information survived and is now easily available to the researcher.

Thanks to the pioneering efforts of the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, the National Archives of Ireland, organizations such as FindmyPast Ireland, Ancestry.co.uk and RootsIreland and the volunteer genealogical community, an ever-increasing range of Ireland’s historical resources are accessible from afar.

As well as exploring the various categories of records that the family historian can turn to, Chris Paton illustrates their use with fascinating case studies. He fully explores the online records available from both the north and the south from the earliest times to the present day. Many overseas collections are also included, and he looks at social networking in an Irish context where many exciting projects are currently underway.

His book is an essential introduction and source of reference for anyone who is keen to trace their Irish roots.

Contents

Glossary

Preface

Chapter 1 – The Genealogical Landscape
 Recording information
 Gateway sites
 Irish Archives
 British archives
 Libraries
 Heritage
 Societies
 Commercial vendors
 Commercial research services
 Networking and Communication
 Languages

Chapter 2 – The Vital Records
 Civil registration
 Other civil records sources
 Adoption and children
 Records in Britain
 Overseas British records
 Surname distributions
 Parish registers
 Burials
 Wills and probate
 Biographical resources
 Newspapers
 Books and other periodicals
 DNA testing

Chapter 3 – Where They Lived
 Census records
 1901 and 1911 censuses
 1821-1851 census remnants
 British censuses
 1939 National Identity Register (UK)
 Other censuses
 Census substitutes
 Land records
 Other land listings
 Maps, gazetteers and place names
 Photographs

Chapter 4 – Occupations
 The Military
 Merchant Navy
 Law and Order
 Other professions
 The Poor

Chapter 5 – The Decade of Centenaries
 Home Rule Crisis
 Women’s Suffrage
 The Dublin Lockout
 The First World War
 The Easter Rising
 Towards Independence
 The Treaty and Civil War
 Ireland's Revolutionaries
 Legacy

Chapter 6 – Ulster
 Antrim
 Armagh
 Cavan
 Donegal
 Down
 Fermanagh
 Londonderry
 Monaghan
 Tyrone

Chapter 7 – Munster
 Clare
 Cork
 Kerry
 Limerick
 Tipperary
 Waterford

Chapter 8 – Connacht
 Galway
 Leitrim
 Mayo
 Roscommon
 Sligo

Chapter 9 – Leinster
 Carlow
 Dublin
 Kildare
 Kilkenny
 Laois
 Longford
 Louth
 Meath
 Offaly
 Westmeath
 Wexford
 Wicklow

Chapter 10 – Ireland's Diaspora
 Emigration
 United States
 Canada
 Australia
 New Zealand
 South America
 Europe
 Ireland Reaching Out
 Irish Citizenship

Further Reading

Index

To purchase a copy, visit https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483 - I hope it helps!

Chris

Pre-order Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) for just £11.99 at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Construction of new learning spaces at TNA

From the National Archives (www.nationalarchives.gov.uk), in Kew, England:

We will shortly begin construction of two major new learning spaces within our first floor reading rooms.

One space will be located next to the library, while the other will occupy part of the existing document reading room here at Kew.

Caroline Ottaway-Searle, Director of Public Engagement at The National Archives, said ‘This project is part of our ongoing programme to re-imagine and reconfigure our site to become a more vibrant and welcoming environment, better equipped to deliver services and events for a wider range of visitors.

‘These new spaces will provide us with improved facilities for children, young people, students and learners of all ages to engage with and learn about our collection.’

Visitors may experience some disruption over the next few weeks as we carry out preparatory works, continuing as construction begins in the autumn. We will try to keep this to a minimum, but some disturbance is inevitable. The works are due to be completed by spring 2020.

Library users may experience some disruption to services from early August while the collection is re-arranged in preparation for the construction works.

Some books, journals and resources may be temporarily relocated but will remain available upon request. Other collections, such as the National Register of Archives paper lists, will be unavailable during this period although the register remains available to search through our catalogue Discovery.

More detailed updates on the affected collections will be available on our library page throughout the project.

In the document reading room, 72 seats (nine tables) will be temporarily removed, along with some camera stands. Almost 300 seats will remain available in this area.

Several phases of the programme have already been completed, including the redevelopment of the public restaurant and the creation of a large multi-purpose events space.

(Source: http://nationalarchives.gov.uk/about/news/new-learning-spaces-for-the-historians-of-tomorrow/ - with thanks to Simon Fowler)

Chris

Pre-order Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) for just £11.99 at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Thursday, 8 August 2019

Writing for genealogy magazines

During this week's #AncestryHour on Twitter (Tues, 7pm, UK time) I mentioned a blog post which was previously written on my personal blog in 2011. It's drawn a fair bit of interest, so what the hell, here it is again! Feel free to add your own up to date tips in the comments, and I hope it helps...! :)

Writing for genealogy magazines

I’ve often had people get in touch and say “I’d love to write for a genealogy magazine” or “I wish I could write an article”. I’ve had a few articles of varying lengths published in magazines over the last few years, and twelve years experience of television documentary script writing before that, so here’s a few tips which might help. (Just to add, these aren’t rules - there are no rules!)


i) Be confident

Everyone who has ever written articles always started off with a first effort. Many people worry that writing something down is an impossible task requiring great linguistic skill and dexterity, and best left to the likes of Shakespeare and Robbie Burns. Personally I find them both a bit old fashioned and boring, so here’s how I see the content of an article. It’s a conversation between you and the reader and its main purpose is to communicate and to impart knowledge. If you can talk the hind leg off a donkey when it comes to your friends and family, try doing the same with a keyboard instead. Do try to get the spelling and basic grammar right though.


ii) Who to write for

If you want to be in print, you can try writing for your local family history society publication, a local newspaper or a mainstream magazine for the shop shelf. Genealogy is a growth area – any subject that can involve a family history connection can be the basis of a great article, whether read by 1 person or 20,000. You can also self-publish, the easiest way to do so being through a blog (through sites such as Wordpress or Blogger). So ignore any snobbery about being published online or offline. The lines are blurring and each provides a valid forum with its own dedicated target audience. Writing is about delivering a target message or article to the reader, using whichever medium works best for the task at hand.


iii) What to write

Most mainstream magazines have a pool of so-called ‘experts’, a regular core of writers who can be relied on to regularly produce articles on various aspects of the family history profession, but there are slots in all magazines for others to contribute, and these are the best places to get started.

The easiest way to get an article published in one of these titles is to submit an idea for something for which you are the absolute person for the job. You may have a real interest in a particular regiment, or old fashioned occupation, or place in the country. If so, convince the editor that you need to write about it.

Alternatively, go for a case study. This is basically a story about something that has usually happened in your personal family history, for which you will be the best expert by far. Magazines are always desperate for case studies! They are also easy to write – how often have you wanted to tell someone about something you’ve found in your tree?! But bear in mind that you are writing it for your reader, not for you. Give the reader something to take away from your story – what way did you research it, what resources can you recommend, how did you overcome a particular problem?


iv) How to write

Before you start writing, pitch the idea to an editor first. You will normally find contact details for the editor inside the cover of a magazine on the first or second page, or on the magazine's website. In a simple paragraph, try to make the editor see why he or she should commission your piece. How will your piece help the reader? If the editor agrees, you will then be asked to give it a go. If it is for a commercially produced magazine, don’t forget to ask how much you are to be paid.

Some editors may then send you a formal commission document, a brief with a shopping list of things to include etc, possibly even ideas on how to structure it. Others will let you do it entirely as you see fit. If you don’t get formal guidance but feel you need it, ask! It is in the editor’s interest for your piece to work as much as it is in yours.

You will be asked to write to a particular length, and as long as you are usually within about twenty words or so on either side of that word count you should be fine. Don’t worry about over-writing it to start with – in fact, it can often be easier to write too much and to then edit it back than to be three hundred words short and to worry about how to fill the gap.

But some things to watch out for – don’t waffle, don’t repeat yourself, and keep pushing the narrative forward in a coherent way. Don’t waste a third of the piece writing an introduction, just get into the subject matter. In many cases I will actually leave the intro until the end, once I know what I want to write into.

Don’t patronise your reader. An opening line such as “As everyone of course knows…” will likely annoy your reader if he or she doesn’t actually know what the hell you’re on about. Don’t assume that you are writing a Janet or John kiddies book either (“Once upon a time there was an archive…”!). Talk to your reader as you would expect to be spoken to. And don’t use language that will make someone think that you are a self-important idiot - you will only end up looking like the fool.

Don’t be too precious about your final product once it is submitted. If lucky, you may be asked to proof read it before publication - if you get the chance, take it! The editors will use your article almost word for word, but they may need to abridge it, they may need to redefine something if they think it is unclear, or they may even postpone its publication. If changes need to be made, they may ask you to do them, they equally may not and may make the amendments themselves.


v) Images

Where possible, try to supply images which you own, or for which there is no copyright claim – ancient black and white images which you don't own the rights to are usually OK if over a hundred years old. If you don’t know the original source of an image, tell the editor. It is then up to he or she to decide whether to use it or not. In most cases, magazines have their own photo editors and access to image libraries etc, but it is always better to try to supply the images you want to see if you can.


vi) Publication

Normally with publication you will get a free copy of the magazine you've written for, but it may not come immediately. For commercially produced magazines, payment can also be delayed after publication (to suit the relevant accounting department's payment run), though make sure you have your invoice in! With the fee from your first article, buy a bottle of Champagne. Drink said Champagne, realise you have no money left, and feel inspired to try again!

The more you write, the more confident you will become at it, but listen to criticism. When I used to work in TV I hated people telling me what they loved about a programme, I always wanted to know what they didn’t, so that I could learn for the next effort. We all make mistakes, the trick is to learn from them, take it on the chin, and produce an even better article next time.

Most importantly, make sure there IS a next time!

Happy writing!

Chris

Pre-order Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) for just £11.99 at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Next Scottish Research Online course starts September 2nd

Just a few weeks to go before the start of my next Scottish Research Online course, which commences on September 2nd 2019, and which runs for 5 weeks - here's the description!

Scottish Research Online (102)
Tutor: Chris Paton

Scotland was first to have major records digitized and offer indexes and images online. It has also been a leader in placing resource information on the World Wide Web. This course describes the major sites, the types of information and data that they offer, the forms in which databases are presented and how to analyze results. You will learn to lay the foundations for searching a family, how to select best resources and what to do next either online or in libraries and archives.
Lesson Headings:
  • Scotlands People, Family Search, Ancestry, FreeCen: content, comparison, assessment
  • Essential Maps and Gazetteers
  • Civil Registration and Census Research Online
  • Searching in Church of Scotland Registers Online
  • Scottish Wills and Inventories Online
  • Take It From Here

Note: it is recommended but not required that students in this course sign up for the basic search option, 30 units/seven days, at ScotlandsPeople (cost is seven pounds).

Each lesson includes exercises and activities; a minimum of 1 one-hour chat s See How the Courses Work.

STUDENTS SAID: "I particularly liked the fact that the course didn't just focus on the well-known BMD resources available, but on a much wider range of websites, including many which give extremely useful background information on the geography and history of the localities where our ancestors lived."

"a very knowledgeable Instructor"

Relevant Countries: Scotland

This course is offered twice annually.

Course Length: 5 Weeks
Start Date: 2 September 2019
Cost: £49.99

And for a wee video introduction, visit https://youtu.be/ssdYLlGtoHw or watch below!




To sign up to the course, please visit https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102

Note that the follow up course to this, Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs starts on November 4th - for further details on this, please visit https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302

Hopefully see you there!

Chris

Pre-order Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) for just £11.99 at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Monday, 5 August 2019

Statistical Accounts of Scotland site now completely free

Update from the Statistical Accounts of Scotland (https://stataccscot.edina.ac.uk/static/statacc/dist/home):

From 1 August 2019, the Statistical Accounts of Scotland Online website will be hosted by the University of Edinburgh Library for a period of two years. Scans, transcripts, map-based searching and our Related Resources will be available free of charge to all users.

As a result of these changes, you no longer need a subscription or a user account to use the website.

Over the next year, our Board will be working with the University of Edinburgh, the University of Glasgow, Historic Environment Scotland and the National Library of Scotland on their plans to integrate the Statistical Accounts of Scotland into their national collections. We look forward to updating you in the coming months as these plans take shape.



COMMENT: The accounts were previously available to read for free, but certain additional functionality required a subscription. This is what is being made free now.

(With thanks to Ali Murray via Facebook)

Chris

Pre-order Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) for just £11.99 at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Saturday, 3 August 2019

More Wexford records added to RootsIreland

From RootsIreland (www.rootsireland.ie):

We are delighted to announce the addition of around 30,000 records for New Ross Roman Catholic parish, County Wexford, including almost 25,000 baptisms and almost 5,000 marriages.

Baptisms 1790 – 1902
Marriages 1765 – 1906

For a full list of sources for Wexford and to search these records, go to www.wexford.rootsireland.ie.

(Source: http://www.rootsireland.ie/2019/08/new-wexford-records-added-3/)

Chris

Pre-order Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) for just £11.99 at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Further delay to World Archives Project return

From Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk):

We have been working to update all parts of the World Archives Project and the time came yesterday for a blog facelift. Coming up next is the online dashboard – because it is more involved we are still anticipating it will be a few more months until we are back online.

Alongside these changes we continue to work on improving the keying tool and backend support. We appreciate your support and patience as we continue to make changes and improve your indexing experience.

(Source: https://blogs.ancestry.com/worldarchivesproject/?p=2987)

Chris

Pre-order Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) for just £11.99 at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Friday, 2 August 2019

FindmyPast adds Cincinnati Roman Catholic records

The latest additions to FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk):


Cincinnati Roman Catholic Parish Records
Over 644,000 new Cincinnati records have been added to the Catholic Heritage Archive. As well as adding new transcripts, images of original documents have been digitized are now available to view on Findmypast. The collection, released in partnership with the Dioceses of Cincinnati, covers 103 parishes and consists of indexes of baptisms, marriages, burials and congregational records spanning the years 1800 to 1979.

This week's update includes:

Cincinnati Roman Catholic Parish Baptisms
Over 297,000 additional records that will reveal your ancestor's baptism date, baptism place and parent's names.

Cincinnati Roman Catholic Parish Marriages
Explore over 182,000 new additions that are perfect for uncovering previous generations and adding new branches to you growing family tree. The transcripts and images collection contain information on for both the bride and groom including marriage date, location and parents' names.

Cincinnati Roman Catholic Parish Burials
Over 183,000 new records that will reveal your ancestors birth year, death date, age at death and place of burial. Some records may also reveal the names of your ancestor's next of kin and the nature of their relationship.

Cincinnati Roman Catholic Congregational Records
Did your ancestor receive their confirmation? Were they a benefactor of a parish? Search over 1,200 new Cincinnati Roman Catholic Congregational Records to find out.

British & Irish Newspaper Update
This week we are delighted to have passed the fantastic milestone of 33 million British & Irish pages on Findmypast, with 90,812 new pages added over the last seven days. We have updated six of our existing titles this week. There are extensive twentieth century additions to both the Aberdeen Press & Journal and the Aberdeen Evening Express. We also continue to augment our wonderful collection of specialist titles. We have added over 30,000 new pages to The Queen, a society magazine which covers the goings-on of high society, but also is a unique record of femininity in the Victorian era. We have also updated three of our early Labour titles – Clarion, Labour Leader and Forward (Glasgow).

Further details and links at https://blog.findmypast.co.uk/findmypast-friday-2639611246.html

Chris

Pre-order Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) for just £11.99 at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

TheGenealogist updates Headstones collection

From TheGenealogist (www.thegenealogist.co.uk):

New Searchable Headstones
TheGenealogist has just released nearly 60,000 new individuals on Headstones from another 61 churchyards and cemeteries. This means that there are now a total of over 174,500 individuals that are fully searchable in TheGenealogist’s Headstone collection which has examples from across England, Scotland and Wales as well as Jersey in the Channel Islands, Cyprus and India.

The new data will allow the family history researcher to discover:
  • 60,000 individuals recorded on Headstones
  • churchyards and cemeteries from various parts of England and Wales
  • use the Map Explorer to see the location of cemeteries in and around an ancestor’s town

This release covers the burial grounds at the following:

Anglesey, St Tysilio; Atcham, St Eata; Badger, St Giles; Belbroughton, Holy Trinity; Betws-y-Coed; Bishops Wood, St John; Blymhill, St Mary; Boningale, St Chad; Bristol, St Paul; Buckhorn Weston, St John; Bylchau, St Thomas; Capel Garmon; Cofton Hackett, St Michael & All Angels; Dolwyddelan, St Gwyddelan; East Orchard, St Thomas; East Stour, Christ Church; Edgerton Cemetery; Frankley, St Leonard; Gwytherin, St Winefride; Harlow, St Mary Little Parndon; Harlow, St Mary Magdalene; Heanton Punchardon, St Augs; Henllan, St Sadwrn; Ince, St James; Iwerne Courtney; Lickey Parish Church; Lickey Rose Hill; Llanedwen; Llanfair Talhaiarn; LLangernyw Capel Garnedd; Llangernyw, St Digain; Llanrwst Seion Methodist Chapel; Llanrwst, St Mary; Llansannan Capel Coffa; Llansannan, St Sannan; Llanwrst, St Grwst; Long Crichel, St Mary; Marnhull Cemetery; Marnhull, Our Lady; Meltham, St James; Newborough, St Peter; Penistone, St John; Penmachno Capel; Penmachno, St Tudclud; Pensford, St Thomas a Becket; Pentrefoelas Church; Publow All Saints; Purse Caundle, St Peter; Rhydymwyn, St John; Santon Downham, St Mary; Shillingstone, Holy Rood; Tal-y-Bont Capel; Tisbury Cemetery; Todber, St Andrew; Trefnant Holy Trinity; Trefriw, St Mary; Tyn-y-Groes; West Orchard, St Luke; Wilton, St Mary & St Nicholas; Wroxeter, St Andrew; Ysbyty Ifan, St John

These fully searchable records are transcribed from images of the headstone memorials. This latest release from TheGenealogist covers many parts of the UK, the images and the transcriptions being provided by volunteers working for the UKIndexer projects which rewards those who wish to photograph, transcribe or do both with credits to pay for genealogy books, software, online subscriptions and more.

Read our article on the UKIndexer Volunteers find Family History:
https://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/featuredarticles/2019/volunteers-find-family-history-rewarding-1146/

These records released today are available to Diamond subscribers of TheGenealogist as part of the Deaths and Burials Records collection.

(With thanks to Nick Thorne)

Chris

Pre-order Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) for just £11.99 at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Thursday, 1 August 2019

Northern Ireland's national archive PRONI - in glorious 3D!

This is a bit of fun - a 360 degree tour of the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (PRONI) produced by young filmmakers during the Summer VR Filmmaking Programme in 2019.

Click and drag on the image with your mouse as it is playing and you should be able to move around the environment as it plays. The video is embedded here and can also be found at https://youtu.be/xNIofUEegTk.



Chris

Pre-order Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) for just £11.99 at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Tracing your Irish Ancestors conference in June 2020

From the Ulster Historical Foundation (www.ancestryireland.com):

Book today for one of our conferences and take advantage of the current exchange rate

Are you already thinking of what to do or where to go for your 2020 research trip? Or are you thinking there may still be time to travel in 2019? Sign up to one of the Foundation's family history research programmes today and save up to $160 on your booking.

Given the current low value of sterling (GBP) against other currencies now is a particularly good time for overseas visitors to book their 2020 getaway. The current exchange rate values will ensure overseas delegates can make a very tidy saving on the cost.

Tracing your Irish Ancestors: Family History Conference
10 - 17 June 2020

Our classic 8-day conference programme returns in June 2020!

This programme will include brand new tours to famous historic sites across the island of Ireland and crucially, for the research enthusiast, all your time can be spent researching in the archives of Belfast and Dublin with the Foundation's team of researchers (or a mix of the two).

Assisted personal research, talks, tours and sightseeing are all part of the eclectic, friendly and fun mix of Tracing Your Irish Ancestors. Join us for the journey. We will be delighted to see you.

Click here to find out more about our June 2020 family history conference.


June 2020 Highlights

To uncover the history of this place, our extensive programme of tours throughout the week will take you through rolling countryside to sites of international renown from the Giant’s Causeway on County Antrim’s wild Atlantic coast to the famous and historic Walls of Derry and Hillsborough Castle, the official Northern Ireland palace of the Royal Family!

Our 2020 June programme will see delegates:
  • Journey into the heart of County Down, enjoying visits to Hillsborough Castle, Killyleagh Castle, Inch Abbey and the St Patrick's Centre.
  • Take a trip through Belfast and south County Antrim, enjoying visits to one of Belfast's most interesting visitor attractions at Crumlin Road Gaol and Ireland's oldest and best preserved Norman citadel at Carrickfergus.
  • Experience brand new tours to some of Dublins most popular visitor attractions - locations to be announced soon.
  • And along with visits to Hillsborough Castle, Carrickfergus Castle and Inch Abbey, our June 2020 programme will see delegates tour the churches, castles and causeways of Ireland.

Further details at https://www.ancestryireland.com/family-history-conference/summer/2020-highlights - book now with just a £350 deposit

Chris

Pre-order Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) for just £11.99 at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Latest FamilySearch additions

The following collections on FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org) have all been updated - the number of new records follows the collection title

Belgium, Namur, Civil Registration, 1800-1912 60
Nova Scotia Marriages, 1864-1918 72,142
Nova Scotia Births, 1864-1877 70
Colombia, Catholic Church Records, 1576-2018 147,944
Denmark, Copenhagen City, Burial Registers, 1805-1968 244,394
England, Herefordshire Bishop's Transcripts, 1583-1898 188,093
Peru, Catholic Church Records, 1603-1992 38,736
Peru, Cemetery Records, 1912-2013 11,708
Spain, Diocese of Cartagena, Catholic Church Records, 1503-1969 65,000
Alaska, State Archives (Juneau), Military Service Discharge Records, 1898-1934 2,176
Arizona, Gila County, Cemetery Records, 1927-1994 1,013
California, Northern U.S. District Court Naturalization Index, 1852-1989 810,279
California, Oakland, Mountain View Cemetery Records, 1857-1973 3,533
California, Santa Clara County, San Jose, Oak Hill Cemetery Headstone Inscriptions, 1838-1985 6
Colorado Naturalization Records, 1876-1990 158,496
Georgia, Church Vital Records, 1828-1991 8,086
Hawaii, Passport Records, 1874-1898 6,575
Idaho, Bonneville County, Idaho Falls, Rose Hill Cemetery Records, 1800-2007 281
Illinois, Northern District Petitions for Naturalization, 1906-1994 95,590
Illinois, Stephenson County, Cedarville Cemetery Record, 1850-2007 83
Illinois, Stephenson County, Lena Park Cemetery Transcriptions, 1854-1983 473
Iowa, Birth Records, 1921-1942 13
Michigan, Civil War Centennial Observance Commission, Committee on Civil War Grave Registration, Burial Records 17
Minnesota Naturalization Records and Indexes, 1872-1962 88,691
Missouri Deaths 1835-1976 39
Montana Naturalization Records, 1868-1999 73,829
New Jersey, Death Index, 1901-1903 2,349
New Mexico Naturalization Records, 1882-1983 27,104
North Carolina, Department of Archives and History, Index to Vital Records, 1800-2000 97
Ohio, Summit County, Coroner Inquests, Hospital and Cemetery Records, 1882-1949 5
Pennsylvania, Huntingdon County, Delayed Birth Records, 1800-1935 21
Texas, Bexar County, San Antonio Cemetery Records, 1893-2007 179
Texas, Bexar County, San Antonio Cemetery Records, 1893-2007 156
United States Deceased Physician File (AMA), 1864-1968 50,200
Utah Naturalization Records, 1906-1930 2,961
Virginia Naturalization Petitions, 1906-1929 22,911
Wisconsin Index to Naturalization Petitions, 1848-1990 4,866
Wisconsin, Milwaukee Petitions for Naturalization, 1848-1991 249,039

Chris

Pre-order Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) for just £11.99 at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.