Sunday, 22 July 2018

Lancashire records added to FindmyPast

The latest additions to FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk):



Lancashire Baptisms
Discover your ancestor in in over 1.1 million baptism register records from Lancashire. Learn when and where your ancestor's baptism took place, as well as your ancestor's parents' names. The registers span the years from 1538 to 1917 and cover 191 parishes across the county. View the full list of places included in our parish list, linked to in the Useful links and resources section.

Lancashire Banns & Marriages
Discover your ancestor in banns and marriage registers from the Lancashire Archives. The registers contains over 713,00 records, span the years 1538 to 1932 and cover 194 Lancashire parishes.

Lancashire Burials
Discover your ancestor in burial registers from Lancashire. Learn when and where your ancestor's burial took place, as well as your ancestor's age at the time of death. The registers, provided by Lancashire Archives, span the years from 1538 to 199, cover 123 parishes and contain over 712,000 records.

Lancashire Parish Registers Browse
Our new collections of Lancashire parish baptisms, marriages, banns and burials are also available to browse.

Illinois, Tazewell County, Obituary Card Index From The "Pekin Times" 1914-2007 Image Browse
Find your relative in over 90,000 obituary index cards taken from the Pekin Times, spanning the years from 1914 to 2007. This collection has been provided by FamilySearch.

Queensland, Inquests 1859-1897
Discover your ancestor in this index of over 14,000 records compiled from the inquest files created by the Justice Department for the period 1859 to 1897. Each result will provide you with a transcript including a combination of your ancestor's name, alias, and inquest year, any additional notes, their file number, reference and item ID.

Extra! Extra! Explore new additions to our newspaper collection
This week we have added 134,662 new pages to The Archive. We have updated five of our existing titles, covering the county of Kent and the city of Liverpool. We have also updated three of our Irish

This week's new additions include:

The years 1925, 1951, 1994-1995, 2001 have been added to the Evening Herald (Dublin)
1857 has been added to the Dover Telegraph and Cinque Ports General Advertiser
The years 1968, 1978, 1981-1983 have been added to the Liverpool Echo
The years 1920 - 1921 have been added to the Freeman's Journal
The years 1912 and 1999 have been added to Irish Independent

Further details are available at https://blog.findmypast.co.uk/findmypast-friday-july-2588351934.html

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Thursday, 19 July 2018

LivingDNA partners with FindmyPast

It looks like Ancestry may be about to get a serious challenge on the DNA front in the UK and Ireland. From LivingDNA (https://www.livingdna.com):

FindmyPast Partnership

We are extremely excited to announce that we will be partnering with Leading British and Irish family history website, Findmypast.

Together, we will be creating a new DNA experience that is designed to help customers explore their British and Irish roots. This new experience will combine cutting-edge science with traditional family history research methods, allowing families to discover more about their past and present.

Our tests provide a unique breakdown of ethnic identities associated with 21 regions across Britain and Ireland by analysing unique combinations of linked DNA. This proprietary method delivers a level of detail that is currently unmatched by any other test available on the market. By combining our technology with deep expertise and Findmypast’s vast collection of more 9 billion historical records and newspaper articles, family historian's will be able to make new discoveries about their British & Irish genetic history.

Living DNA testing kits are now available to purchase https://www.findmypast.co.uk/ancestry-dna-testing/ and co-branded kits will be launched when the new integrated Findmypast and Living DNA service is introduced later in the year.

“Our partnership with Findmypast continues Living DNA’s mission to make DNA testing simple. We are passionate at not only providing cutting edge ways of looking at your DNA but to do so with strict privacy measures by never selling your data. This partnership allows the most precise DNA test on the market to work together with Findmypast’s family history records in a way not done before” says Living DNA Co-Founder, David Nicholson.

Tamsin Todd, CEO of Findmypast, said: “As the world leader for British and Irish records, we work hard every day to help our customers feel the thrill of making discoveries about their families. I’m delighted that we are partnering with a British company, Living DNA, who are pioneers in DNA technology, and look forward to combining our expertise in DNA technology and historical records to help people around the world connect with their British and Irish roots.”

(Source story: https://www.livingdna.com/blog/333-findmypast-partnership)

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Sunday, 15 July 2018

Newly catalogued Welsh collections from RCAHMW

The latest monthly edition of the National Monuments Record of Wales (NMRW) Archives and Library Bulletin lists all newly catalogued material, including archival items, library books and journal articles, all of which are all available to view in its public reading room. The full archive catalogue is available on Coflein (www.coflein.gov.uk) and contains digital copies of many of the items listed. All publications may be found on the Commission's online Library Catalogue.

For further details visit https://rcahmw.gov.uk/royal-commission-archive-library-bulletin-of-newly-catalogued-material-june-2018/.

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Canadian Expeditionary Force service files update

From Library and Archives Canada:

As of today, 608,399 of 640,000 files are available online in our Personnel Records of the First World War database. Please visit the Digitization of the Canadian Expeditionary Force Service Files page for more details on the digitization project.

Further details are available at https://thediscoverblog.com/2018/07/15/digitization-of-the-canadian-expeditionary-force-personnel-service-files-update-of-july-2018/


Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Jacobite Histories added to FindmyPast

The latest records added to FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk):


Berkshire Registers & Records
Explore over 600 registers and records from the English county of Berkshire. Discover your ancestor in parish registers from Leckhamstead and St Mary, Reading.

Durham Registers & Records
Learn more about your Durham ancestors with our collection of more than 2,800 registers and records from the North Eastern County.

Scotland, Jacobite Histories 1715-1745
Discover more about the Jacobites and the Jacobite Risings with this collection of historical publications. These documents are presented in a PDF format and can be searched by name, conflict, publication title and year, and keyword.

Greater London Burial Index
Over 109,000 new additions covering 27 Middlesex parishes have been added to the Greater London Burial Index. The records consist of transcripts that may reveal a combination of your relative's name, age, occupation, religious denomination and where they were buried.

British & Irish Newspapers
This week we have added 111,538 new pages to our collection of historic British Newspapers. We have added one new title – the Witney Express and Oxfordshire and Midland Counties Herald – and updated seven of our existing titles. We have added pages to four of our Irish titles, including the incredibly influential Freeman's Journal, as well as adding to our Liverpool and Dover titles, and also to the Music Hall and Theatre Review.

The new additions include;

Witney Express and Oxfordshire and Midland Counties Herald (new title) - 1869-1887
Evening Herald (Dublin) - 1897, 1899, 1901, 1907, 1996
Irish Independent - 1913, 1915
Freeman's Journal - 1912-1919, 1922-1924
Sligo Champion - 1983, 1988-1995
Liverpool Echo - 1973, 1979-1980
Music Hall and Theatre Review - 1910-1911

Further details and links at https://blog.findmypast.co.uk/findmypast-friday-july-13th-2586088101.html

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Tuesday, 10 July 2018

TNA podcast - West Africa and the First World War

The National Archives (www.nationalarchives.gov.uk) in England has a free to podcast online which may be of interest to those researching the First World War:

West Africa and the First World War
https://media.nationalarchives.gov.uk/index.php/west-africa-first-world-war/

The First World War had a great impact on West Africa, as Britain ordered the invasion of German colonies in Cameroon and Togoland, using its own colonies as base. The West African Frontier Force, drawn from Sierra Leone, Ghana, Nigeria and Gambia played a key role in the campaign. War had also had a great impact on the civilian population, as the British drew off workers and resources. How did African soldiers experience the campaign, and what did the war mean for West African societies as a whole?

There is a downloadable media file on the page which can also be interacted with as you listen.

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Latest edition of Irish Lives Remembered online

From Eneclann:

The Spring Edition of Irish Lives Remembered is available to view now. Our cover star is Mark Hamill, aka Luke Skywalker! We also have:

Paul McCotter on the Dunne surname;
Dr. Maurice Gleeson on genetics and surnames;
Ned Kelly on Treasure Trove;
Brian Mitchell on Derry/Londonderry records;
Maureen Wlodarczyk on Francis Kilkenny and the Irish Home-Going Assoication
Lorna Moloney and Kealan McCormack on Knowing Nenagh
Michèle Castiaux on the Irish Geological Association Archive Project
An update on Findmypast and the Catholic Heritage Archive with Niall Cullen
Nathan Mannion on Zambia's Grandfather of Education
Fiona Fitzsimons reviews Ships from Ireland to E
arly America 1623–1850
A Book Excerpt from Damian Shiels The Forgotten Irish: Irish Emigrant Experiences in America
Jayne Shrimpton's Photo-Detective;
Patrick’s Page with Patrick Roycroft; and
Ask Genie, our family history agony aunt.

To freely access the magazine visit https://irishlivesremembered.ie/latest-edition/.

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

The Irish Jewish Family History Database

A new website has been launched online to help with your Jewish research in Ireland.

The Irish Jewish Family History Database has information on 61,821 Irish based Jews from between 1700 to the present day, as collated by Stuart Rosenblatt. Information includes basic vital records, as well as schooling and occupational details.

For further information visit www.irishjewishroots.com.



(With thanks to Michael Merrigan on Twitter)

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Saturday, 7 July 2018

American Revolutionary War records available for free until July 15th

If any of your ancestors made their way from Britain and Ireland to the American colonies and got involved in the Revolutionary War, Fold 3 (www.fold3.com) has free access to some records until July 15th which might be of interest:


Access Revolutionary War Records for Free*

Revolutionary War Signing for Payment Vouchers To commemorate Independence Day, Fold3 is providing free access* to our Revolutionary War Collection July 1–15.



We continue to offer everyday free access to our Constitutional Convention Records, Continental Congress Papers, George Washington Correspondence, and other archives from the founding of our nation! See the original manuscripts written with quill and ink by our founding fathers.

Our Revolutionary War collection contains 22 collections with almost 5 million records! Here’s just a few of the titles:

Revolutionary War Rolls: The Continental Army was made up of troops provided by each colony. They formed battalions, regiments, companies or militias. There is an introduction to this collection from the National Archives, and then you can search by state and narrow down to a specific fighting group.

Navy Casualty Reports, 1776 – 1941: This collection records both wartime and peacetime deaths of navy soldiers in the Revolutionary War and later conflicts including the War of 1812, Civil War, WWI and others.

Revolutionary War Service Records: These are service records for soldiers who fought for the Continental Army. They are arranged under state, fighting company and then alphabetically by soldier’s name.

Revolutionary War Prize Cases – Captured Vessels: After the US declared independence from the British, colonists were no match for the powerful British Navy. In an effort to disrupt British commerce, colonists captured British vessels. The vessels were known as prizes. These records, which are copies of the original manuscripts, are cases heard on appeal by courts from 1776-1886. You can browse them by state, case name, or by vessel name.

Final Payment Vouchers Index for Military Pensions, 1818-1864: This is a collection of records of final pension payments made to military veterans or his widow. They shed light on where a family may have moved after the war, death dates of veterans, widows, or dependent children, and sometimes the maiden name of a widow.

Get started searching our Revolutionary War Collection today! Access via https://go.fold3.com/revolutionary-war

*Access to the records in the featured collections will be free until July 15, 2018 at 11:59 p.m. MT. Free access requires registration for a free Fold3 account. After the free access period ends, you will only be able to view the records in the featured collections using a paid Fold3 membership.

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Historic Medical Officer of Health reports

There's an interesting spot by Canadian based blogger John Reid concerning new Aberdeen Medical Officer of Health Reports that are now available online from the Wellcome Library - John's post is at http://anglo-celtic-connections.blogspot.com/2018/07/medical-officer-of-health-reports-for.html. The post refers to the reports from the years 1890, 1895, 1900 and 1902-1971, for the city of Aberdeen only, although a search of the catalogue shows that there are many other reports from across Britain and Ireland that are also available.

Medical Officer of Health reports from across Scotland for the year 1891 only are also freely available on the ScotlandsPlaces website at https://scotlandsplaces.gov.uk/digital-volumes/official-reports/medical-officer-health-reports.Here's the blurb on the site for this collection:

From 1890 onwards a full-time Medical Officer of Health was appointed in each county in Scotland with a remit to report on the state of health of the county and its various parishes and towns. The annual reports of the Medical Officers give an objective view of the living conditions, diseases and major health issues in different parts of Scotland. Information on the individual parishes and towns are found within the 'registration districts' headings found in these volumes. The National Archives of Scotland (NAS) has an incomplete set of the published reports from 1891 onwards (NAS HH62).

A useful resource to help add some context to the environments where your ancestors once lived.

(With thanks to John Reid)

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Further English church records added to FindmyPast

A quiet week for FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk) this week in terms of new records:


Cambridgeshire Registers & Records
Explore publications pertaining to the English county of Cambridgeshire. Discover your ancestor in more than 300 parish register entries from Orwell and St Michael's.

Buckinghamshire Registers & Records
Discover your ancestor in over 600 records from the English county of Buckinghamshire. Explore parish registers from Great Hampden and Stewkeley as well as a historical guide to the county's Highways & Byways.

Thames & Medway Baptisms
Over 9,000 new records are now available to search. The new additions cover baptisms performed in the parish of St Mary Magdalene in Woolwich between 1837 and 1851.

Thames & Medway Burials
Over 6,000 new records pertaining to burials in the parish of St Nicholas in Deptford between 1813 and 1847 have been added to our collection of Thames & Medway Burials.

Further details are at https://blog.findmypast.co.uk/findmypast-friday-july-6th-2584243508.html, including links to the respective search pages.

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

RootsIreland adds further Waterford records

From RootsIreland (www.rootsireland.ie):

We are pleased to announce that Waterford Heritage have added over 12,000 records to its database at www.waterford.rootsireland.ie including the following:

Church of Ireland Marriages 11,772 Records
Tramore / Carbally Roman Catholic Baptisms 1,126 Records

For a full list of available resources for County Waterford on the website please visit http://waterford.rootsireland.ie/generic.php?filename=sources.tpl&selectedMenu=sources

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Guild of One-Name Studies webinar

From the Guild of One-Name Studies (https://one-name.org):

Our next webinar in the 7 Pillars series is on Tuesday, July 17th at 7:00 pm (BST). To learn more about the presenters and register for the webinar click on this link - https://one-name.org/2018-webinar-series-no-8/


It's all about Six Months In with a New Study. Whether you just made the decision to start a one-name study, or you are just now getting back to it, the first six months in can make or break your study. Feeling overwhelmed or energized? Your answer might depend on your approach.

Join us as Guild members Melanie Caldicott and Karen Heenan-Davies discuss checklists, preliminary projects, early data gathering and analysis, and taking stock after the first six months. Whether you have just started your one-name study or you are getting back to one that has been neglected, come learn how to get past those early hurdles.

The webinar will be available a few days after the event for those who didn't listen and watch live. It'll only be available for a week or so; then it'll be available to Guild members only.

(With thanks to Wendy Archer)

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Friday, 6 July 2018

More poll books join TheGenealogist

From TheGenealogist (www.thegenealogist.co.uk):


New Poll Books Added

TheGenealogist has just released 116,218 records into its ever growing Poll Book Database. This useful resource for family historians can be used to find ancestors' residences from the period before the census collection. The newly released Poll Books range from 1705 to the 1830s, joining records covering periods between census years.

The database allows researchers to:

* Discover ancestors who had the vote
* Find where they were registered to cast their ballot
* Discover the nature of their qualification to vote, such as possessing a Corn Warehouse, a Workshop, a House, or owning a Brewhouse
* These Poll Books range from 1705 to the 1830s.

The records cover 18 different registers of people who were entitled to vote in between 1705 and the 1830s and cover constituencies situated in Abingdon, Bristol, Hampshire, Somerset, Suffolk, Maidstone, Norfolk, Northamptonshire, Worcestershire and York.

These records have been transcribed by volunteers on the UKindexer.co.uk website, which brings benefits to the volunteers as well as the wider family history community. They join the millions of electoral resources on TheGenealogist, which include Electoral registers, Voters lists and Absentee Voters.

These records are available as part of the site's Diamond Subscription.

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Who Do You Think You Are returns 9 July 2018

The new series of Who Do You Think You Are? continues on Monday 9 July 2018 at 9pm for viewers in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland, and at 10.45pm for the Welsh.

From the BBC website (https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0bb2dd9):

Actress Olivia Colman claims to be 'the least adventurous person I know.' As for her ancestors, apart from a rumour that there was a Frenchwoman somewhere in her family tree, Olivia thinks they are largely from Norfolk. Olivia is astonished to discover that she needs to travel to India to find out more about her great-great-great-grandmother Harriot.

Olivia finds records that reveal Harriot was an orphan in 1811 on a ship bound for England from (then) Calcutta. Harriot's father was an an Englishman, but the identity of her mother, who gave birth to her in a remote Indian village, is a mystery Olivia delights in solving.

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Free access to Ancestry's UK and Irish records this weekend

From Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk):

FREE ACCESS TO ALL UK AND IRISH RECORDS 6-9 JULY

Discover a deeper past–starting today!

For 4 days starting today, we’re really opening up our site, giving you access to all our UK and Irish records, absolutely free.

And with the 1939 Register now available on Ancestry, now is the time to build a bridge from living memory to the deeper past.

*Access to the records in the featured collections will start on 6 July and be free until 9 July 2018 at 23:59 BST. After the free access period ends, you will only be able to view the records in the featured collections using an Ancestry.co.uk paid membership. To see a full list of the records in the featured collections please click here.

Have fun!

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Tuesday, 3 July 2018

MyHeritage offers free access to US newspapers

This could be useful if you have American connections - free access to American newspapers via MyHeritage (www.myheritage.com), until July 8th:

In honor of July 4th, we are delighted to announce FREE access to all U.S. Newspaper collections on MyHeritage’s SuperSearch™, for a limited time.

From July 3, 2018 through July 8, 2018, we are providing free access to all 33,591,658 U.S. Newspaper records – no data subscription required!

Newspapers are essential resources for genealogy and family history research. In addition to providing birth, marriage, and death notices, society pages contain stories rich with information on persons of interest, as well as various community activities and events.

Search our U.S. newspaper collections on SuperSearch™

The U.S. Newspaper collection currently holds newspapers from the states of Pennsylvania, Ohio, Connecticut, Maine, New York, Kentucky, Indiana, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Maryland, West Virginia, New Jersey, and Delaware. In addition to the newspaper collections organized by state, we are also providing free access to Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers, 1836-1922 collection. This collection encompasses 10,186,650 pages drawn from newspapers throughout the entire United States from 1836-1922.

The collection is available via https://www.myheritage.com/research/category-8000/newspapers

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

UK, Register of Railway Employee Injuries and Deaths, 1911-1915 joins Ancestry

On Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk):

Web: UK, Register of Railway Employee Injuries and Deaths, 1911-1915
https://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=70855
Source: http://www.railwayaccidents.port.ac.uk/: accessed 12th April 2018.

This is the blurb from the original project site:

Welcome to the website for the Railway Work, Life and Death project, a joint initiative between the University of Portsmouth and the National Railway Museum (NRM). We’re aiming to make it easier to find out about railway worker accidents in Britain between 1911 and 1915 – who was involved, what they were doing on the railways, what happened to them and why. Although today most people don’t realise it, working on the railways 100 years ago was incredibly dangerous, with hundreds killed and tens of thousands injured each year.

In this project a team of volunteers from the NRM, to whom we’re immensely grateful, have painstakingly been through reports produced by the state-appointed Railway Inspectorate between 1911 and 1915, detailing investigations into railway worker accidents. They’ve extracted the details found in the reports – things like names, ages, roles, companies and details of the accident – and entered them into a spreadsheet. This spreadsheet is now available, on this website, so that anyone who’s interested can easily learn more about work and accidents on Britain’s railways around the time of the First World War. We think this will be of great interest to all sorts of people: railway enthusiasts, family historians, railway museums and heritage centres, the current railway industry and academics.

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Friday, 29 June 2018

MyHeritage adds filtering to its DNA platform

News of another very useful advance from MyHeritage (www.myheritage.com) on its excellent DNA platform:

MyHeritage Launches New Filtering System for DNA Matches

We’re excited to announce the release of a new feature — a brand new filtering system for DNA Matches.

Thanks to the growth of our database, most users on MyHeritage now have thousands of DNA Matches. Managing all those DNA Matches, and making sense of them has become a challenge — and this is exactly where the new filtering system comes in!

Filtering lets you view a subset of your DNA Matches at a time, focusing on those that match particular criteria, of more interest to you. We’ve added a beautiful user interface to the DNA Overview page that lets you filter your DNA Matches easily by relationship, by country or by ethnicity. And we’ve added a powerful filter toolbar that lets you do all that, and much more. Using the new filter toolbar, you can combine multiple filters, and filter matches by additional criteria such as those that have a family tree, have shared ancestral surnames with you or have Smart Matches™ with you.

Filtering of DNA Matches can be combined with sorting and searching. For example, you can easily find all your DNA Matches that include “Gordon” in the name of the match or as an ancestral surname, filtering them to view only those who have a particular ethnicity and live in a particular country, while sorting them alphabetically or by the amount of shared DNA.

These powerful capabilities, together with the high accuracy of the matches, make MyHeritage’s DNA Matches the most powerful and easy to use DNA matches on the market today. Anyone who has taken a MyHeritage DNA test or has uploaded DNA data from another service can now take advantage of our new filtering system for DNA Matches, and it’s free! (Some advanced features in the DNA Match review page require a subscription, such as viewing the ethnicity results of a DNA Match).

As part of this update, we’ve also made some improvements to the user interface of the DNA Matches in general. For example, we placed ethnicity and DNA Matches on two adjacent tabs to make it very easy to switch from one to the other for any of the DNA kits you manage. Viewing family trees of your DNA Matches now uses the Pedigree View.

Many users have told us that we have the best user interface for DNA Matches, and now we’ve made it even better.


For the full story, and a step by step guide, visit https://blog.myheritage.com/2018/06/revolutionary-new-filtering-system-for-dna-matching/.

(With thanks to Daniel Horowitz)

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Latest English record additions added to FindmyPast

The latest additions to FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk):


Kent, Lydd Midwife's Birth Register 1757-1815
Search for your Kent ancestors in William Waylett's birth register. The collection contains over 2,400 records transcribed from the original register of William Waylett (1729-1815), a male midwife who practiced in Lydd and the surrounding parishes on Romney Marsh in Kent.

Sussex Monumental Inscriptions
Over 1,800 new records have been added to our collection of Sussex Monumental Inscriptions. The new additions cover churchyards in Eastbourne, Litlington, Lullington and West Dean.

Northumberland and Durham Memorial Inscriptions
Over 14,000 new records have been added to our collection of Northumberland and Durham Memorial Inscriptions. The new additions cover churchyards in Birtley, Blyth, Boldon, Eighton Banks, Gosforth, Great Lumley, Penshaw, Ryhope, South Shields, Whitley Bay and Woodhorn.

Yorkshire Burials
Over 38,000 new records from Stoney Royd Cemetery in Halifax have been added to our collection of Yorkshire burials. Yorkshire burials now contains over 5.1 million records spanning more than 400 years of the county's rich history.

Further details and links available at https://blog.findmypast.co.uk/findmypast-friday-june-29th-2582126903.html

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Tuesday, 26 June 2018

FamilySearch adds 135 million records for Denmark, Finland, Sweden

From FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org):

FamilySearch Adds 135M New Records for Denmark, Finland, Sweden

FamilySearch Tips to Research Denmark, Finland, Sweden Genealogical RecordsSALT LAKE CITY (26 June 2018), FamilySearch announced today the availability of its newest record collections—135.4 million free digital historical recordsfrom Denmark, Finland, and Sweden. These new collections were digitized in partnership with MyHeritage and the National Archives of Denmark and Finland and can now be accessed at FamilySearch.

The freely searchable collections are comprised of church records, including birth, marriage, and death records, confirmations, moving-in and moving-out records; court; tax lists; examination books; and more.

“The new collections will provide a better research experience,” said Whitney Peterson, FamilySearch International collections specialist. “Uniquely identifying ancestors from these countries can be difficult due to the frequency of common names [the use of patronymics]. Before now, our vital indexes have provided broad but incomplete coverage. These new, complete collections will make it easier to find and track your ancestors.”

The new records include the following:

Denmark
55.1 million new records added
Census records (1834-1930).
Church records (1686–1941; record images only)
Land records of Denmark—deeds and mortgages (record images only)
Probate records—Denmark estate records (1436–1964; record images only); Probate indexes (1674–1851).
Denmark civil marriages (1851–1961)
Denmark, Copenhagen civil marriages (1739–1964; indexed 1877–1964)

Finland
33.4 million new records added
Finland church census and preconfirmation books (1657–1915)
Tax lists of Suomi-Henkikirjara (1819–1915).


Sweden
46.9 million new records added
Sweden household examination books (1880–1920).
Church books (Kyrkoböcker) from Kopparberg (1604–1860), Örebro (until 1860), and Östergötland (1555–1911).


Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Society of Genealogists supports Family Tree Live

From Warner Group Publications, news on Family Tree Live (see http://britishgenes.blogspot.com/2018/05/family-tree-live-genealogy-event.html):

Society of Genealogists supports Family Tree Live
Family Tree Live, in partnership with the Federation of Family History Societies
Alexandra Palace, London – 26 and 27 April 2019



The team behind the new family history show Family Tree Live are delighted to announce the Society of Genealogists (SoG) as an Associate Sponsor of the event.

In addition to the sponsorship, SoG will also be sponsoring the ‘Society of Genealogists Lecture Theatre’ at the two-day London event and will be giving visitors help and advice from the SoG stand.

Else Churchill, Genealogist at SoG, said: ‘Genealogy education and learning is at the heart of the Society’s foundation and hence we are delighted to be sponsoring a lecture theatre at Family Tree Live. Additionally, on the SoG stand you can meet our members and experts who are on hand to offer help and advice with your research and show how the Society’s library and remarkable research collections can take your family history further.’

Family Tree Live is set to become the UK’s most popular family history event. The major exhibition will feature lectures, workshops, displays and stands and will be suitable for all levels of family history experience.

Helen Tovey, Editor of Family Tree magazine, said: ‘It’s fantastic to be working with the Society of Genealogists, and their support fits perfectly with the strong learning aspect of Family Tree Live. We’re excited with the range of lectures, workshops and hands-on activities to be offered over the two days, and delighted to welcome SoG as an associate sponsor, an exhibitor and the sponsor of the Society of Genealogists Lecture Theatre.’

(With thanks to Lauren Beharrell)

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Thursday, 21 June 2018

Colour tithe maps for Yorkshire added to TheGenealogist

From TheGenealogist (www.thegenealogist.co.uk):

The Genealogist releases the new Change of Names Database as well as the Colour Tithe Maps for the North and East Ridings of Yorkshire

TheGenealogist has just released a great new resource for family historians wanting to find ancestors who had officially changed their forename or surname in Britain. The Change of Names Database covers information gathered from a number of sources including Private Acts of Parliament; Royal Licences published in the London and Dublin Gazettes; notices of changes of name published in The Times after 1861 with a few notices from other newspapers; registers of the Lord Lyon [King of Arms] where Scottish changes of name were commonly recorded; records in the office of the Ulster King at Arms and also some private information.

Use this database to:

* Discover ancestors that recorded a change of name

* Find what name had been adopted and the name discarded

This is available to Diamond Subscribers and can be found under Miscellaneous Records.

The second release this month is to coincide with the return of The Family History Show, York to the racecourse on Saturday 23rd June. TheGenealogist has now added the Colour Tithe Maps for the North Riding and the East Riding of Yorkshire. Complimenting the already released schedule books and greyscale maps, these colour maps add an attractive visual aid to find where your ancestor lived in the mid 1800s.


The fully searchable tithe records released online allow researchers to:

* Find plots of land owned or occupied by ancestors in early Victorian North Riding and East Riding of Yorkshire on colour maps

* See where your forebears lived, farmed or perhaps occupied a small cottage or a massive estate.

To search these and a huge assortment of other genealogical records see more at: https://www.thegenealogist.co.uk

Read our article on the fascinating Change of Name Database at: https://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/featuredarticles/2018/change-of-name-database-discovers-ancestors-who-adopted-different-surnames-846/

(With thanks to Nick Thorne)

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

National Records of Scotland now wifi enabled

I have been reliably informed that the National Records of Scotland (www.nrscotland.gov.uk) now has wifi on site. Not a lot more to add really.

WIFI....!!!!!!!!

Archivists do move in mysterious ways.


I suspect this isn't a flag pole in the picture above, but a large antenna...! :)

(With thanks to Lorna Kinnaird)

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Tuesday, 19 June 2018

Ancestry adds Aberdeenshire, Scotland, Electoral Registers, 1832-1976

Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk) has added the following Scottish electoral registers collections:

Aberdeenshire, Scotland, Electoral Registers, 1832-1976
https://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=61479
Source: Aberdeenshire Electoral Registers, Aberdeen City and Aberdeenshire Archives, Aberdeen, Scotland.

This database contains yearly registers listing names and residences of people in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, who were eligible to vote in elections. These year-by-year registers can help place your ancestors in a particular place and possibly also reveal some information about property they owned.

Historical Background
Electoral registers are lists of individuals who are eligible to vote during the time the register is in force (usually one year). Registration for voters in Scotland has been required since 1832, and registers were typically published annually. Restrictive property requirements denied the vote to much of the population for years, though these were eased somewhat in 1867 and 1884 through the Second and Third Reform Acts. There were also requirements when it came to local elections that varied from borough to borough (e.g. residence), and voters had to petition to be added to the electoral registers.

Property restrictions were finally removed for men in 1918, when most males age 21 and older were allowed to vote. The franchise was extended to some women over age 30 in 1918, but it was not until 1928 that the voting age was made 21 for both men and women. Thus, the number of names listed in the registers increases with the expansion of suffrage.

Searching the Registers
Electoral registers typically provide a name and place of abode, and older registers may include a description of property and qualifications to vote. Registers were compiled at a local level, with names appearing alphabetically within wards/districts. Many of the registers in this database have been indexed electronically, which allows you to search them by name, but if you’re searching for a somewhat common name it will be helpful to know the area in which your ancestor lived to narrow your results. The street address can be searched in the Location field.

Please find below a guide to the codes used in the registers:

R Residence qualification
BP Business premises qualification
O Occupational qualification (occupation in this case is occupation of a property, not employment)
HO Qualification through husband's occupation
NM Naval or military voter

From 1928, with the advent of women's suffrage, the following codes can be found:

R Residence qualification (man)
Rw Residence qualification (woman)
B Business premises qualification (man)
Bw Business premises qualification (woman)
O Occupational qualification (man)
Ow Occupational qualification (woman)
D Qualification through wife's occupation
Dw Qualification through husband's occupation
NM Naval or military voter

The following extra codes can also sometimes be seen

J Eligible to serve as juror
SJ Eligible to serve as special juror
a Absent voter
BP Business premises register
CI Civilian residence register
SE Service register
RR Ratepayers register

Please note that no registers were produced during the war years 1916, 1917 and 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943 and 1944.

Note: This index was created using text recognition software, records were not transcribed. We have created indexes of the electoral registers for every fifth year.

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Maritime Perspectives: Collecting Art of a Seafaring Nation

From the Scottish Maritime Museum (www.scottishmaritimemuseum.org) in Irvine:

The Scottish Maritime Museum will unveil a remarkable new national art collection featuring works by artists such as FCB Cadell, Ian Hamilton Finlay, Muirhead Bone, Kate Downie and John Bellany in a major art exhibition opening on Friday 1st June.

‘Maritime Perspectives: Collecting Art of a Seafaring Nation’, which will run at the Scottish Maritime Museum on the Harbourside in Irvine, North Ayrshire, until Sunday 21st October, will be the first full showing for the new art collection which captures life along Scotland’s coastline in all its grit and glory.

The exhibition will feature over 80 works gathered for the collection over the last three years through SMMart, an ambitious project to create a nationally significant art collection to enrich the nationally recognised maritime heritage at the Museum.


For further details, see the original story at https://www.scottishmaritimemuseum.org/Pages/FAQs/Category/exhibitions, where you can also download a flyer of art related events to tie in.

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Forces War Records ‘WWI Casualty Records’ collection reaches 1 million names

From Forces War Records (www.forces-war-records.co.uk):

Over 1 million NEW WWI Casualty records transcribed - What our WWI casualties collection database means to genealogists

Forces War Records ‘WWI Casualty Records’ collection has now reached the milestone of over 1 million individuals records transcribed and available to search by name.

The Casualty lists are an excellent resource to use when researching a soldier who fought in the Great War 1914-18.



At the start of the First World War, it was decided to publish casualty list for soldiers who were reported killed, died of wounds or accident, been declared as missing, wounded or admitted to hospital with shell-shock. The ‘Daily War Office Casualty Lists’

were first published on 1st September 1914 and printed within various newspapers such as The Times, Daily Telegraph, The Irish Times and The Scotsman until August 1917. In August, it was decided that newspapers would no longer be able to print the casualty list in full due to the shortage of paper and the effect of morale on the public seeing the great number of casualties daily. Instead, the Daily Casualty List were published as the ‘Weekly Casualty List’ by His Majesty’s Stationary Office. Forces War Records has now transcribed all the records published within The Daily Telegraph Newspaper and we are very proud to be working with the National Library of Scotland to transcribe their original collection of the ‘Weekly Casualty List by His Majesty’s Stationary Office’. These records are of enormous value to researchers, for in many cases the information that a man appeared in a list will not be available elsewhere. Researchers should note that the appearance of a name on the list was some time after the man became a casualty – usually around a month or so. Armed with this information and the War Diary of the man’s unit, the circumstances in which he became a casualty can be researched. Also, you can use the exclusive Forces War Records ‘WWI Troop Movements and ORBATS’ interactive map to follow your ancestor's footsteps while listening to the in-depth and highly detailed commentary.

During the First World War the British war effort required an incredible amount of manpower – with over 8,500,000 million serving at some point during the conflict – and whilst this figure is inflated by colonial contributions – numerically it means almost a fifth of the UK population served. The official Medical Services statistics report 2,272,998 men wounded so there was little over a 1 in 3 chance that a man was wounded! (Although the 2 million does include men who were injured multiple times so that statistic will be misleading).

The proportion of the country serving meant that everyone will have known several people fighting, and due to the great numbers of casualties often the quickest to find out the fate of friends, or family was to read these daily lists. This led to several national newspapers, including the Times and the Daily Telegraph publishing the lists as well as many local papers. Given the fate of many of the First World War Service records, this will be the only surviving record for many of these men. Furthermore, if a man was listed as wounded in this record then you can infer that he was eligible to wear a wound stripe on his uniform.

Figure 1: WWI Wounded Stripe

The collection available on Force War Records is likely to include the following:

* Surname

* First Name or Initials

* Regimental Numbers

* Rank

* Regiment or Corps

* Battalion

* Attached Unit

* Gallantry Awards

* Fate (wounded, captured, shell shock, missing etc)

* Duty Location

* Date of Incident

* Place of Enlistment (given as Resided Town)

Please be aware that due to the way we collate and cross-reference our databases, some records will contain more information than that listed above.

N.B. Soldiers who were killed are to be found in the ‘Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914-1919’ collection and not within this new collection.

The benefits of this unique collection of Casualty list in your military genealogy research is that it can be the only record of a solider having been wounded if their service records was destroyed and they weren’t discharged with a Silver War Badge

Why not log on to Forces War Records and search our NEW collection to find out more about your own ancestors – there could be a war hero in your family just waiting to be discovered and remembered…

FYI – Link to collection: https://www.forces-war-records.co.uk/over-1-million-new-wwi-casualty-records

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Wednesday, 13 June 2018

ScotlandsPeople adds new maps and plans collection

From ScotlandsPeople (www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk):

More than 2,400 historic maps, plans and drawings from National Records of Scotland (NRS) collections have been made available on the ScotlandsPeople website. Many of the maps show the changing Scottish landscape over time. They also record where people lived or worked, so they can throw light on ancestors’ lives and even suggest new avenues for research. The maps and plans cover certain areas of Scotland, but not the wholeof the country. They include both country estates and plans of towns and cities, including for example Glasgow. Most of the maps and plans originate in the records of court cases, Scottish government departments, Heritors’ records, as well as in private collections gifted to or purchased by NRS.

If you would like to find out more, read our maps and plans guide, or search the maps and plans.

The maps and plans collection is amongst the finest in the UK and contains the largest number of Scottish manuscript maps and plans held by any single institution. Spanning four centuries, the collections cover both manuscript and printed topographical maps and plans. They are particularly strong in estate and railway plans; architectural drawings; and engineering drawings, particularly of ships, railway engines and rolling stock. More maps and plans will be added to the ScotlandsPeople website.

Plan of the Carron River from Carron works to Grangemouth, 1797
National Records of Scotland, RHP242/2

For more information, and several examples of maps that have been added, please visit https://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk/article/news-article-maps-and-plans-release.

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Exhibition: Voices and Votes - Suffrage and the Representation of the People, 1832-1928

A new major exhibition coming to PRONI (www.nidirect.gov.uk/proni) in Belfast:

Voices and Votes: Suffrage and the Representation of the People, 1832-1928


The exhibition explores the history of suffrage from a local perspective, particularly the struggle for women’s representation, and includes unique archival material which highlights some of the people who championed change.

A range of educational resources will also be launched on the day, including an interactive resource featuring archival material relating to the suffrage movement, a graphic novel exploring the lives of Countess Constance Markievicz and Edith, Lady Londonderry, and a 2.5D animation charting the history of the suffrage movement.

The event will also see the first public performance of a new drama production from Kabosh Theatre Company, featuring a fictional meeting between Edith, Lady Londonderry and Countess Constance Markievicz.

Dr Margaret Ward, Queen’s University Belfast, will deliver a keynote lecture, ‘Winning the Vote: Suffrage in Ulster’.

Additional information

PRONI opening hours and getting here
DATE: Monday 2 July, 10.00am-1.00pm
LOCATION: PRONI, Titanic Quarter, Belfast
Admission is FREE, however booking is essential. Register for this event at Eventbrite
LUNCH SERVED from 12.30pm
For further details, please visit the PRONI website

(With thanks to PRONI)

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Friday, 8 June 2018

FindmyPast updates its Suffragette Collection

FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk) has updated its Suffragette Collection:


Suffragette Collection Update

Explore over 22,000 new additions to our Suffragette Collection. Exclusively available on Findmypast, this latest batch of records has been digitised and released online for the first time in association with the National Archives. It includes a wide variety of Home Office and Metropolitan Police files as well as 1911 census returns that list either "Suffragette" or "Suffragist" as an occupation.

The Suffragette Collection now contains more than 78,000 records that reveal the struggles endured by the movement's most ardent supporters and highlight the State's response as it attempted to contain them. These rich documents bring together the stories of women from all walks of life who actively supported women's suffrage, either by attending demonstrations and meetings or opting for militant "direct action".

The collection spans from 1902 to 1919 and includes the following series of records from The National Archives: AR 1, ASSI 52, CRIM 1, CRIM 9, DPP 1, HO 144, HO 45, HO 140, LO 3, MEPO 2, MEPO 3, PCOM 7, PCOM 8, PRO 30, T 1, T 172, TS 27, and WORK 11. Among these are photographs of suffragettes, cabinet letters, calendars of prisoners, Home Office papers of suffragette disturbances, an index of women arrested between 1906 and 1914 (the official watch list of over 1,300 suffragettes), reports of force-feeding, and more.


Women's Suffrage Petition 1866

Discover your ancestor in this index from the women's suffrage petition of 1866. The petition contains over 1,500 names and was obtained through www.parliament.uk. Each transcript will list your ancestor's name, address and any additional notes. Additional information about these records can be found on the source's website.

The suffrage petition of 1866 was the first Votes for Women mass petition put before Parliament. It was presented on 7 June 1866 by John Stuart Mill, a Member of Parliament. The original document with the individuals' signatures no longer exists. However, the list of signatories was printed in a pamphlet for circulation in 1866. Today, only two copies of this list exist, and it was from this document that this index was created.


Suffragette Newspapers Browse

Over 58,000 new records and 14 new titles have been added to our collection of Suffragette Newspapers.

The new titles available to browse include:

Church League for Women's Suffrage
Common Cause
Conservative and Unionist Women's Franchise Review
Free Church Suffrage Times
International Woman Suffrage News
Jus Suffragi
The Suffragist
The Vote
Woman's Dreadnought
Woman's Leader and the Common Cause
Woman's Signal
Women's Franchise
Women's Suffrage
Women's Suffrage Record

Further details at https://blog.findmypast.co.uk/findmypast-friday-2573964835.html

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Thursday, 7 June 2018

The 1718 migration from Ulster

From the Ulster Historical Foundation (www.ancestryireland.com):

The 1718 Migration: From Ulster to New England

The 1718 Migration: From Ulster to New England covers perhaps the most important single year in the story of the relationship between Ulster and America. The 1718 migration was not by any means the first migration of people from Ulster to America, but it is probably the first that was organised to bring groups of settlers from one definite catchment area, and importantly, these were people who wanted to continue to live together in the new land.

This publication which only costs one penny (P&P charges do apply) is now available on our bookstore - see https://www.booksireland.org.uk/store/all-departments/the-1718-migration-from-ulster-to-new-england

1718 Migration Bundle

To mark the re-publication of The 1718 Migration we are offering a 1718 Migration bundle. Get Ulster Emigration to Colonial America, 1718–1775, Robert Dinsmoor’s Scotch-Irish Poems as well as The 1718 Migration: From Ulster to New England for just £19.99

Visit https://www.booksireland.org.uk/store/all-departments/1718-migration-bundle to order your bundle.

(With thanks to the Foundation via email)

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Looking forward to Glasgow Family History Discovery Day!

It's the conference of the week, and I'm looking forward to speaking at it about Irish Family History Resources Online - and as usual, I'll have a few wee words and thoughts to impart!

The Glasgow Family History Discovery Day kicks off at 10am at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 35 Julian Avenue, Kelvinside, Glasgow, G12 0RB. Amongst the speakers there will be Irene O'Brien, Alison Spring, Bronwen Fogg, Roger Gardiner, Sandy Duncanson, June Cumming and James Greer.

For further details, please visit http://www.glasgowfamilydiscoveryday.com



I'll hopefully see you there! :)

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

MyHeritage adds further protection for cybersecurity

From MyHeritage (www.myheritage.com):

MyHeritage Releases Two-Factor Authentication

On Monday, June 4, we released a statement regarding a cybersecurity incident. Earlier that same day, at approximately 1 p.m. EST, MyHeritage’s Chief Information Security Officer received a message from a security researcher that he had found a file containing email addresses and hashed passwords, on a private server outside of MyHeritage. Our Information Security Team received the file from the security researcher, reviewed it, and confirmed that its contents originated from MyHeritage and included 92.3 million email addresses of users who signed up to MyHeritage up to and including October 26, 2017 (the date of the breach), and their hashed passwords. MyHeritage does not store user passwords, but rather a one-way hash of each password, in which the hash key differs for each customer. This means that anyone gaining access to the hashed passwords does not have the actual passwords.The security researcher reported that no other data related to MyHeritage was found on the private server.

We have no reason to believe that any other information was compromised, such as the actual user passwords, credit card details, family tree data or DNA data. Credit card details are only stored on trusted third-party billing providers, while other types of sensitive data are stored by MyHeritage on segregated systems, separate from those that store the email addresses, and they include added layers of security.

We took several immediate steps, including establishing an Information Security Incident Response Team to investigate the incident, notifying relevant authorities, setting up a special customer support team, expiring all user passwords and forcing users to reset their password upon next login, and expediting our work on the upcoming Two-Factor Authentication (2FA) feature to further protect MyHeritage accounts.



Two-Factor Authentication had been scheduled to be added to MyHeritage accounts in the July-August timeframe but following the breach and our June 4th promise to expedite its development, we worked around the clock and are glad to announce today that we have completed the development and have released its initial implementation to all users of MyHeritage.

In MyHeritage’s first release of 2FA, you designate a mobile phone and link it to your account by providing MyHeritage with its number. Then, any time you will log in to MyHeritage from a new computer, tablet or phone, or if a month has passed since your last login, MyHeritage will send you a six-digit verification code as a text (SMS) message to your mobile phone and you will need to enter it on MyHeritage to complete the login successfully.

The privacy and the security of our users' data on MyHeritage is our highest priority. The implementation of the Two-Factor Authentication, MyHeritage being among the first in the genealogy and DNA industry to provide users with this added layer of security, is a testament to this commitment.

Please find more information in this blog post:
https://blog.myheritage.com/2018/06/new-myheritage-adds-two-factor-authentication-2fa-to-secure-your-account

(With thanks to Daniel Horowitz)

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Wednesday, 6 June 2018

Family Tree magazine's 2019 European river cruise

From the UK's Family Tree magazine (https://www.family-tree.co.uk), news of an interesting new venture in September 2019:


We've teamed up with AMAWaterways (https://www.amawaterways.co.uk), a luxury River Cruise line to bring you a brand new 7-night Family History Cruise. The cruise begins in Amsterdam on Monday 9th September 2019 and ends in Basel, on Monday 16th September.

You’ll cruise aboard the 156-guest AmaMora, the new addition to AmaWaterways’ award-winning fleet. Known for their exquisite cuisine, active discovery tours and excursions, extensive complimentary amenities and personalised service, AmaWaterways’ ship AmaMora will provide the perfect setting for discovering your family history.

Sail with a family history expert, who will host several sessions and interactive activities throughout the cruise on topics including essential
records, information about DNA testing, how to use online resources,visiting archives and your next steps!

Where will you go?

9 Sep: Embark AMSTERDAM

10 Sep: AMSTERDAM
Amsterdam Canal cruise and city tour. Scenic cruising out of Amsterdam

11 Sep: COLOGNE
Walking tour and cathedral visit. Plus, enjoy a Cologne bike tour or Kölsch beer tasting

12 Sep: RHINE GORGE
“Castles along the Rhine” scenic cruising
RÜDESHEIM
Wine tasting, Gondola ride or Schloss Johannisberg bike tour. Plus, Siegfried’s Mechanical Music Museum or Rüdesheimer coffee

13 Sep: LUDWIGSHAFEN
“Romantic Heidelberg” excursionm, with Heidelberg Philosopher’s Path hike or “Secrets of Speyer” excursion

14 Sep: STRASBOURG
“The Gem of Alsace” tour or Strasbourg bike tour

15 Sep: BREISACH
Riquewihr walking tour, with Freiburg excursion, a Breisach wine country bike tour or Black Forest excursion

16 Sep: Disembark BASEL


Further details, inclusing the costs, are available at https://www.family-tree.co.uk/news-and-views/family-history-river-cruise-2019.

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Tuesday, 5 June 2018

Franco-Welsh family archive gifted to Cardiff University Archives

News concerning an acquisition by Cardiff University's Special Collections and Archives (https://www.cardiff.ac.uk/special-collections):

Gift of family archive reveals Franco-Welsh links

Window on the past: experiences of an extraordinary family

The significant role in the two World Wars of a prominent French family who made the Welsh capital their home is being celebrated at Cardiff University.

Paul Barbier became the University’s first Professor of French after coming to the city to take up the post of lecturer at the newly founded University College of South Wales and Monmouthshire in 1883. The family’s continuing strong links to Cardiff have recently led to relatives donating a wealth of diaries, letters and photographs to the Special Collections and Archives at Cardiff University.

Paul Barbier’s eight children were all educated in the city, and two of his sons, Paul and Georges, were called up to join the French army during the First World War, and were seconded as interpreters to the British Expeditionary Forces.

During the Second World War, their nephew, Jacques De Guélis, played a crucial role as a spy in the secretive Special Operations Executive (SOE) due to his Franco-British background. His fluent French allowed him to go behind enemy lines unnoticed no less than three times and he was hailed a hero for his efforts. Following a car crash shortly after the war ended, he was buried at Cathays Cemetery in Cardiff.

Relatives Delphine Isaaman, Paul Barbier and other family members will attend a special event to launch the archive on Wednesday June 6, the 74th anniversary of D-Day. There will also be a blue plaque unveiled at 3 Museum Place, the house on the University campus where Jacques De Guélis was born on 6th April 1907.

Mrs Isaaman, a cousin of De Guélis, said: “I’m absolutely delighted that these documents will now be available to scholars and the wider public. There is an enormous amount of social history in the archive about the first 50 years of the twentieth century. It’s right that its new home is the Welsh capital, where we have such strong ties. ”

Professor Hanna Diamond, of the School of Modern Languages, an expert in French history, said: “This is a hugely significant collection, which will give the public, students and academics the chance to learn about a family with an incredible story. It also gives us an insight into what life was like for people in Cardiff during the late 19th Century and early 20th Century. It’s sure to become an invaluable resource and a fitting legacy for Paul Barbier and his descendants.”

Alan Vaughan Hughes, Head of Special Collections and Archives, said: “We are delighted to offer this remarkable archive a safe home for the people and students of Cardiff. The richness of the archive offers a magnificent insight into Cardiff’s rich cultural and civic heritage and we are excited to be making it available to the public as well as academics and students.”

(With thanks to Victoria Dando)

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.