Monday, 21 January 2019

192.com adds first portion of 2019 UK Open Electoral Register

From 192.com (www.192.com):

The First Electoral Roll Update for 2019

The first portion of the 2019 Open Register has been added to the site this week.

Included in this update are millions of names and addresses from across the UK that have been changed, validated or even added for the first time.

Now is a great time to start a search on 192.com as your chances of finding all the people you're looking for have just improved! 

Searches are available via https://www.192.com/people/electoral-roll/

Chris

My next Scottish Research Online course starts March 11th 2019 - see www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. For my Scottish and Irish themed books, visit https://britishgenes.blogspot.com/p/my-books.html. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Sunday, 20 January 2019

British Newspaper Archive approaches 30 million pages of content

The British Newspaper Archive (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) is now reaching the three quarters of the way mark with its project, as it approaches 30 million pages of online content (as I write this it is currently at 29,905,890 pages).

This was the original announcement about the project from May 2010 (on my former blog at http://scottishancestry.blogspot.com/2010/05/mass-digitisation-of-historic-british.html):

British Library and Brightsolid partnership to digitise up to 40 million pages of historic newspapers

The British Library’s Chief Executive, Dame Lynne Brindley, will today announce a major new partnership between the Library and online publisher brightsolid, owner of online brands including findmypast.co.uk and Friends Reunited. The ten-year agreement will deliver the most significant mass digitisation of newspapers the UK has ever seen: up to 40 million historic pages from the national newspaper collection will be digitised, making large parts of this unparalleled resource available online for the first time.

Spanning three centuries and including 52,000 local, regional, national and international titles, the British Library holds one of the world’s finest collections of newspapers. Each year the Newspaper Library at Colindale is used by 30,000 researchers in subjects ranging from family history and genealogy to sports statistics, politics and industrial history. This vast resource is held mainly in hard copy and microfilm, necessitating a trip to the north London site for people wishing to use the collection.

The partnership between the British Library and brightsolid will enable the digitisation of a minimum of 4 million pages of newspapers over the first two years. Over the course of ten years, the agreement aims to deliver up to 40 million pages as the mass digitisation process becomes progressively more efficient and as in-copyright content is scanned following negotiation with rightsholders.


I think it is fair to say that the BNA has transformed family history research, and is by far one of the most significant digitisation projects of this century so far.

Just ten million pages to go!

Here are the additions for the last 30 days:

Carlisle Journal
1847, 1883, 1885, 1889, 1891-1892, 1894, 1896, 1904-1905, 1908-1912

Sunday World (Dublin)
1987-1993, 1995-1996

Drogheda Argus and Leinster Journal
1965-1986, 1988-2005

Perthshire Advertiser
1875-1884, 1886-1906, 1908-1913, 1920-1932, 1937-1938, 1986

New Ross Standard
1911-1914, 1916-1986, 2002-2005

Manchester Evening News
1946

Gorey Guardian
1994-2006

Bray People
1988-1997, 1999-2002, 2004-2005

Lichfield Mercury
1929-1931, 1942, 1964, 1966, 1968, 1971-1973, 1985-1986, 1988-1989, 1991

Cheshire Observer
1931-1938, 1946-1949, 1951-1979

Lennox Herald
1885-1886, 1888-1892

Wexford People
1986, 1994, 2005

Western Mail
1920, 1923, 1933-1935, 1938, 1946-1947, 1952, 1959

Kerryman
1986-1987, 2003-2005

Drogheda Independent
1986-1987, 2005

Belfast Telegraph
1979-1983

Sligo Champion
1912-1921

Lloyd's List
1890, 1892

Chris

My next Scottish Research Online course starts March 11th 2019 - see www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. For my Scottish and Irish themed books, visit https://britishgenes.blogspot.com/p/my-books.html. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

NLS uploads Ordnance Survey 1950s-1960s maps

From Chris Fleet, Map Curator of the National Library of Scotland's Collections and Research Department:

New Ordnance Survey National Grid 1:10,560 maps (1950s-1960s) go online

The National Library of Scotland (www.nls.uk) has just put online 13,953 Ordnance Survey maps which provide near-complete coverage of England, Scotland and Wales in the 1950s-1960s.

These maps show excellent detail of the mid-20th century urban and rural landscape, including farms and settlements, roads and railways, rivers and watercourses, administrative and field boundaries, woodland and land use. Buildings are simplified in urban areas but many street names are also shown. They are especially useful for more remote rural areas, where this is the most detailed scale of Ordnance Survey mapping. This online addition includes all our out-of-copyright maps at this scale, published over 50 years ago.

NLS Maps Website User Survey

During January and February 2019, we are undertaking a survey of those using our maps website in order to help plan future developments. We are very keen for a range of responses from personal, educational, business and professional users. All responses will be anonymous.

Detail about the survey is available at this link: https://maps.nls.uk/additions.html#61.

The survey is available at: https://maps.nls.uk/survey

This and other map news is also available in our January 2019 Cairt newsletter at: https://www.nls.uk/media/1685264/cairt34.pdf

(With thanks to Chris)

Chris

My next Scottish Research Online course starts March 11th 2019 - see www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. For my Scottish and Irish themed books, visit https://britishgenes.blogspot.com/p/my-books.html. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Saturday, 19 January 2019

Boring Ancestors?!

The following is an article I wrote for Practical Family History magazine, in March 2009:

Boring Ancestors

Chris Paton takes a look at the potential folly of trying to characterise our ancestors based on a limited amount of documentary information…

How many times have we come across an ancestor who appears to have been the most boring person on Earth?! “His name was John Smith” or “he was only an agricultural labourer” are for many people war cries to signpost that it is time to hand in the genealogical trowel on a particular line. We may be keen to dismiss our ancestors very easily when nothing obvious appears to stand out about them, but a 'boring' ancestor may be one simply badly recorded to posterity, or whose records have not survived to the modern day.

Personalising our ancestors

It can often prove extremely difficult to characterise our ancestors’ lives, as in many cases very little information actually does survive about them. Yet we are driven to try to learn as much as we can – they were our relatives and we want to relate to them as family, not just as names on a page. If our ancestors left memoirs, and put into their own words their life experiences, we can be extremely lucky, as these can greatly help us to understand who they once were and what their outlook on life was.

I was once fortunate, whilst trying to break a genealogical brick wall for a client, to discover that a brother of her four times great grandfather had kept a diary in the Aberdeenshire parish of Fyvie. A microfilm of the book, covering over ten years of his life in the early 1800s, was available for consultation at the National Records of Scotland. This turned out to be gold dust, as it recounted the names and events of many family members which allowed me to push the tree back a further four generations. The diary was more valuable from another point of view, however, in that it also provided a great deal of insight into the writer’s religious views, his attitudes to certain members of his family, his business ability and more. In such a case, with so much material available, it was possible to gain a sense of what drove him as a person, and to some extent, other members of the family around him. He was, for example, devout in his religious observance, and genuinely so, with many long passages quoting various scriptural passages that he had heard each Sunday, from which he had taken comfort. At the same time, he left very little money to his eldest son in his will, deeply hurt that he had made a life for himself in America and had cut all ties with his family back home.

Most of us, though, will at best simply get to know our ancestors from occasional documentary references that place them in a set location at a particular time. How well these were recorded will affect how we visualise the person described. If John Smith is listed as ‘surgeon general of the British Army’, he will grab our attention more immediately than a simple description of him as a labourer. But what if John Smith the labourer helped to build the Titanic, took part in a protest that secured the vote for ordinary working men and women, fought in a military campaign or was crushed in a rebellion? He may not have been boring at all; his exploits may simply be waiting to be found within more unusual sources.

Creating portraits

So how do we redress this? With the information we find initially, from vital records and census reports, we can create a basic chronology for our ancestor, and then try to further flesh out the story from other sources, such as newspapers and wills. In many cases, an ancestor may appear dull because he has not been well documented, but it may also be that we do not know where to look for the right records. If we become stuck, we need to create some options for ourselves. We can join our local family history society and ask for assistance from those who are further down the road with their research. At the same time, we might post what little we do know of our ancestors online, on a website or in a discussion forum, and use that as a lure to attract others who may be working on the same family. Books and magazines may offer some clues as to where to go next, and a short genealogy course might even help.

We can also look around our ancestors, instead of directly at them, and establish the world within which they lived. If all we have are a couple of vague references that describe our relative as an agricultural labourer, for example, we can still ask some useful questions. What was the parish like with which he lived? Can we locate the records of others doing the same job in the same area, and perhaps gain an understanding of his experience from their
stories? What sort of farm work was going on in the area, and what was the bigger economic picture? Then there is the domestic situation. What was the house like that he would have lived within? Does it still exist, can we visit it, or perhaps a contemporary building in his area that was similar? What religion was he? Where would he have worshipped, etc?

Whilst we can to some degree try to recreate the environment within which they existed, we must also appreciate that we can never completely understand that environment from a modern perspective. What may have been truly shocking to an earlier generation may seem laughable to us today, but it was still shocking back then. People burned witches in the past out of fear. Even if we cannot understand why they may have done so, we still need to accept that such a fear was very real. In many cases we may not understand the rationale for something at all, but that does not mean it was not there, and we should be careful not to invent an interpretation that may in fact be false.

Don’t overdo it

Whilst we may be desperate to characterise our ancestors, we need to be careful that we do not over-interpret the information that we do have, or try to ascribe characteristics to them based on our limited perspective of events.

I once found a letter in an archive regarding the recruitment of my four times great grandfather into a regiment in 1797, which described how a recruiting sergeant in Perth had for several days tried to coax both him and four other weavers to abandon their looms, and to accompany him to Edinburgh. It was addressed to his superior at Edinburgh Castle, who was demanding to know where the new troops were. The poor sergeant reported that they were all refusing to leave for fear of being heavily fined for non-completion of the work. When I first read it, I burst out laughing. We talk in my family about “the Paton Pride”, basically the trait that we all share where we tend do things when we are good and ready, and not before! Clearly this was a long standing tradition. But then I realised that four other people had done exactly the same thing as my ancestor. It wasn’t a personality trait at all – it was an economic reality that drove their actions, not some genetic trait passed down through the generations.

We should also avoid trying to over-romanticise an ancestor’s story. An ancestor may have been transported for having stolen an item, and we may be tempted to believe that such a robbery had been committed perhaps because the family was starving and destitute in some Dickensian hell. But another possibility does also exist however – that the ancestor may well have been a career criminal, only happy when running off with someone else’s gold watch!

The sad truth is that sometimes we may never know who our ancestors really were, but the fun remains in the constant effort to find out. Our ancestors might well have been boring – but only accept that as the truth if you find the evidence to prove it.

(c) Chris Paton


My next Scottish Research Online course starts March 11th 2019 - see www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.
For my Scottish and Irish themed books, visit https://britishgenes.blogspot.com/p/my-books.html. Further news is published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Irish convict records talk at National Archives of Ireland

From the National Archives of Ireland (www.nationalarchives.ie) in Dublin:

Our evening lecture series for 2019 will begin with ‘Banished Beyond the Seas: NAI records of convict transportation to Australia, 1788-1868’, a talk to be given by Joan Kavanagh in our Reading Room on Thursday 31 January at 6pm.

All lectures are free, no booking is required and all are welcome to attend!

Chris

My next Scottish Research Online course starts March 11th 2019 - see www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. For my Scottish and Irish themed books, visit https://britishgenes.blogspot.com/p/my-books.html. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Friday, 18 January 2019

The Scold's Bridle

I've just read the astonishing fact that the use of a Scold's Bridle was not outlawed in Britain until 1967.

The Scold's Bridle was a punishment device, an iron mask made to be worn, usually, by women accused of being gossips, or of having committed some other transgressive behaviour - its intention was to both humilate and punish at the same time.

There's a fascinating short article about the Scold's Bridle in Dundee’s Albert Museum at https://www.scottishlegal.com/article/our-legal-heritage-the-branks-or-scold-s-bridle.

For more on the Scold's Bridle, see the following YouTube video from the Wellcome Collection:



Also available at https://youtu.be/T7lGsWO5R10

Chris

My next Scottish Research Online course starts March 11th 2019 - see www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. For my Scottish and Irish themed books, visit https://britishgenes.blogspot.com/p/my-books.html. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

FindmyPast updates National Burial Index for England and Wales

The following records have been added to FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk):

National Burial Index for England & Wales
Over 717,000 new records have been added to the National Burial Index. The new additions cover 288 burial places in the historic counties of Co. Durham, Northumberland and Cumberland as well as 656 burials sites across Lincolnshire. Each transcript will list a combination of your ancestor's name, age, death year, burial place, burial date and place of worship.

England Roman Catholic Parish Baptisms
Over 65,000 exclusive new records covering the Diocese of Middlesbrough have been added to our collection of England Roman Catholic Parish Baptisms. The new additions cover 36 parishes across the county, span the years 1742 to 1917 and are the latest newly digitised records to join the collection which now covers the Dioceses of Westminster, Birmingham and Middlesbrough.

England Roman Catholic Parish Marriages
Over 19,000 exclusive new Diocese of Middlesbrough Sacramental Register entries have been added to our collection of England Roman Catholic Parish Marriages. The new additions cover marriages preformed across 28 parishes between 1796 and 1944.

England Roman Catholic Parish Burials
Over 7,000 new and exclusive records held by the Diocese of Middlesbrough have been added to our collection of England Roman Catholic Parish Burials. The new additions cover burial sites in 22 parishes between 1774 and 1974.

England Roman Catholic Parish Congregational records
Over 47,000 records from the Diocese of Middlesbrough have also been added to our collection of English Catholic Parish Congregational Records. Covering 30 parishes and spanning the years 1743 to 1920, these records will enable you to learn more about your ancestor's relationship with their local parish.

United States General Land Office Records 1796-2013
Did your ancestors buy Public Domain land? Search this vast collection of over six million records for land sale documents (patents) and discover the original title and exact parcel of land purchased by your ancestor from the U.S. Federal Government. Each entry includes a transcript and an image of the original document.

Middlesex Baptisms 1543-1876
Over 10,000 baptism records covering the parish of All Saints in Iselworth between 1566 and 1783 have been added to the collection.

British & Irish Newspaper Update
This week we have added 108,256 pages to the Archive. We have added two brand new titles – the Gorey Guardian, published in Wexford, and the Bray People, published in Wicklow. Both these titles cover the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. We have also added new pages to the New Ross Standard and to the Lichfield Mercury.

Further details and links at https://blog.findmypast.co.uk/findmypast-friday-january-18th-2019-2626272312.html.

Chris

My next Scottish Research Online course starts March 11th 2019 - see www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. For my Scottish and Irish themed books, visit https://britishgenes.blogspot.com/p/my-books.html. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Thursday, 17 January 2019

PRONI YouTube additions - 1994 files and the 1918 vote

The Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (www.nidirect.gov.uk/proni) has added a new video to its YouTube channel.

Secrets from the files 1994
Dr Eamon Phoenix and Sam McBride reveal the secrets behind the news headlines from the recently released government files of 1994 at the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland. This event took place on Tuesday 8th January 2019.

The video is available at https://youtu.be/M--VekANFaw, and presented below.




Also recently added:

PRONI - 1918 and the Vote
To mark the centenary of the 1918 General Election, PRONI is held a conference on 22 November 2018. This event saw the launch of new PRONI resources about Suffrage and the 1918 election.

The video is available at https://youtu.be/tR7_sDsTVD0 and presneted here also:



For more from PRONI on YouTube visit https://www.youtube.com/user/PRONIonline.

Chris

My next Scottish Research Online course starts March 11th 2019 - see www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. For my Scottish and Irish themed books, visit https://britishgenes.blogspot.com/p/my-books.html. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Green cards may be needed for post-Brexit UK-Ireland car travel

I don't propose to get into a running commentary on this blog about the current Brexit shenanigans in London just now - but I will point out relevant potential issues that may affect genealogists as a consequence of what is tragically beginning to look like a no-deal exit by the UK from the EU on March 29th.

The first of these may be of interest to anyone intending to travel from Britain or Northern Ireland to Dublin for Back to Our Past (http://backtoourpast.ie) later this year from October 19th-21st, or for anyone from the Republic wishing to travel to Britain for any of the large family history events taking place in England after March 29th.

If the UK leaves without agreeing a deal, the UK's Association of British Insurers (www.abi.org.uk) has advised that you will need to apply for a green card from your insurance company to travel with your car from the UK into the EU, and from the EU into the UK. Sadly, this also applies to travel between the UK and the Republic of Ireland, even though the Common Travel Area is to be maintained. You will most likely continue to be insured by your company (though do check), but you will need the green card to demonstrate this. The ABI's advice is available online at https://www.abi.org.uk/news/news-articles/2019/01/dont-forget-your-green-card---british-insurers-issue-advice-to-customers-on-no-deal-brexit/ and it advises that you will need to apply a month before you travel.

One saving grace, for now at least, for those travelling from the UK into the Republic of Ireland is that you will not need to apply for an international driving permit (IDP) to visit - I am as yet unclear if this is also true for travelling from Ireland to the UK. An IDP will be a necessity, however, if travelling from Britain to the European continent. In the UK, these will be made available at Post Offices from the start of February.

Further information from the UK's government is available at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/prepare-to-drive-in-the-eu-after-brexit/requirements-for-all-uk-citizens-driving-abroad-from-29-march-2019.

The Irish Times has the story across the water at https://www.irishtimes.com/news/ireland/irish-news/irish-motorists-will-need-green-cards-to-drive-in-uk-under-brexit-1.3760534. This notes that in Ireland "Insurers and insurance brokers in the Republic will begin issuing green cards to policyholders from March ahead of March 29th, the scheduled date for the UK to leave the EU."

Further coverage is available on the BBC at https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-46891186.

Chris

My next Scottish Research Online course starts March 11th 2019 - see www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. For my Scottish and Irish themed books, visit https://britishgenes.blogspot.com/p/my-books.html. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Wednesday, 16 January 2019

Forthcoming events at PRONI in Belfast

Forthcoming events at the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (www.nidirect.gov.uk/proni):

PRONI Workshop - Getting Started
Fri, Jan 25, 11:00am
Free

PRONI Workshop – Online Family and Local History Resources
Thu, Jan 31, 6:00pm
Free

Women in the Archives Information Evening
Thu, Jan 17, 7:00pm
Free

Whatever the Weather!
Tue, Mar 26, 1:00pm
Free

Wreck and rescue talk series
Wed, Feb 27, 1:00pm
Free

The development of physical education in Northern Ireland, 1922-1954
Thu, Mar 7, 1:00pm
Free

Buried in Belfast - Women in the Archives
Wed, Jan 23, 9:30am
Free

Soft power and subterfuge: the women of Tyrone's Rebellion, 1593-1603
Thu, Feb 21, 7:00pm
Free

J.C. Beckett Annual Memorial Lecture
Thu, Jun 6, 7:00pm
Free

Bad Bridget - Women and Crime, Past and Present
Fri, Jan 25, 10:00am
Free

For further details, and to book, visit https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/d/united-kingdom--belfast/proni/

(With thanks to the PRONI Express)

Chris

My next Scottish Research Online course starts March 11th 2019 - see www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. For my Scottish and Irish themed books, visit https://britishgenes.blogspot.com/p/my-books.html. Further news published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Tuesday, 15 January 2019

North Staffordshire mining heritage to go online

The Chatterley Whitfield Friends group (http://chatterleywhitfieldfriends.org.uk) has won a £10,000 grant from Stoke-on-Trent City Council’s community investment fund to digitise thousands of photos, maps, artefacts and other documents which were abandoned following the collapse of Chatterley Whitfield Mining Museum in 1993.

As part of the project, volunteers from the group are also planning to film interviews with former miners to create an oral history. The last mine to close in the area was Silverdale in 1998.

For more on the story, visit the Stoke Sentinel story at www.stokesentinel.co.uk/treasure-trove-north-staffordshires-mining-2416769.

Chris

Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. For my Scottish and Irish themed books, visit https://britishgenes.blogspot.com/p/my-books.html. Further news content is published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Free MyHeritage webinar - Newspapers for Family Research

MyHeritage (www.myheritage.com) has a free webinar hosted online:

Webinar Playback: Newspapers for Family Research

Newspapers often include obituaries, birth, marriage, and death announcements, and plenty of other useful information. They can be a real treasure trove for anyone looking to learn more about their ancestors. In this compelling and highly-praised webinar hosted by Legacy Family Tree Webinars, MyHeritage expert genealogist Daniel Horowitz explains how to best search newspapers and describes the specialized MyHeritage newspaper matching technology. Daniel includes lots of tips of sources outside of MyHeritage as well. Don't miss this webinar.

To access the webinar visit https://familytreewebinars.com/download.php?webinar_id=714


Chris

Details of my genealogical research service are available at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. For my Scottish and Irish themed books, visit https://britishgenes.blogspot.com/p/my-books.html. Further news content is published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Monday, 14 January 2019

Dukes of Grafton papers accepted by UK Government in lieu of tax

From the National Archives in England (http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/about/news/allocation-of-papers-accepted-in-lieu-of-tax-2/):

Part of the archive of the Northamptonshire estates of the Dukes of Grafton has been accepted in lieu of tax by the government.

Notable material includes accounts, correspondence, deeds, estate maps, architectural drawings, and manorial records from the 17th to the 20th centuries.

Any library, record office or institution in the United Kingdom interested in acquiring the papers should contact Philip Gale, Head of Standards and Improvement, Archives Sector Development, The National Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 4DU (email asd@nationalarchives.gov.uk) for further particulars in the first instance.

Applications for allocation of this material must be received in writing at the same address by Friday, 22 February 2019.

COMMENT: For what it's worth, my self-employed tax return is due end of this month. If HMRC wants a copy of my family history as part payment, by all means, do drop me a note, happy to discuss! :)

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Scottish Research Online course starts March 11th

My next Scottish Research Online course starts on March 11th 2019, running for 5 weeks - here's the description!

Scottish Research Online (102)
Tutor: Chris Paton

Scotland was first to have major records digitized and offer indexes and images online. It has also been a leader in placing resource information on the World Wide Web. This course describes the major sites, the types of information and data that they offer, the forms in which databases are presented and how to analyze results. You will learn to lay the foundations for searching a family, how to select best resources and what to do next either online or in libraries and archives.
Lesson Headings:
  • Scotlands People, Family Search, Ancestry, FreeCen: content, comparison, assessment
  • Essential Maps and Gazetteers
  • Civil Registration and Census Research Online
  • Searching in Church of Scotland Registers Online
  • Scottish Wills and Inventories Online
  • Take It From Here

Note: it is recommended but not required that students in this course sign up for the basic search option, 30 units/seven days, at ScotlandsPeople (cost is seven pounds).

Each lesson includes exercises and activities; a minimum of 1 one-hour chat s See How the Courses Work.

STUDENTS SAID: "I particularly liked the fact that the course didn't just focus on the well-known BMD resources available, but on a much wider range of websites, including many which give extremely useful background information on the geography and history of the localities where our ancestors lived."

"a very knowledgeable Instructor"

Relevant Countries: Scotland

This course is offered twice annually.

Course Length: 5 Weeks
Start Date: 11 Mar 2019
Cost: £49.99

And for a wee video introduction, visit https://youtu.be/ssdYLlGtoHw or watch below!




To sign up to the course, please visit https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102

Note that the follow up course to this, Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs starts on May 13th - for further details on this, please visit https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302

Hopefully see you there!

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Look Online - Scottish Burial Records

The following article was first published in the now defunct Your Family Tree magazine issue 173 (September 2016):

Look Online: Scottish burial records

Whilst records for baptisms, births and marriages are relatively straightforward to locate in Scotland, information about burials can be somewhat more difficult to unearth. Thankfully a range of record types and finding aids available online can help to make the process a little easier. These include death records that note the date of burial, interment records within church created parish registers, records from local government authorities, and monumental inscriptions that describe basic details of a person's life and death, and possibly others interred within the same lair.

The civil registration of Scottish births, marriages and deaths commenced in January 1855. From 1855 to 1860, civil death records not only noted where and when a person had passed away, as well as the cause of death, but also the place of burial and the name of the undertaker responsible. The latter details were unfortunately no longer noted by registrars beyond this point, however, a record located in this period may still steer you towards a potential family burial ground where other relatives may have been buried in later years. Civil registration records for death are available online via the pay-per-view based www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk.

Prior to the civil registration era the churches were largely responsible for burials. The main Church of Scotland parish records prior to 1855 are also available on ScotlandsPeople, but there are several things to be aware of when using them. The first point to note is that despite several acts of the Kirk's General Assembly to instruct parishes to keep burial registers, most dragged their heels, with only about a third having any surviving records concerning interments. The oldest surviving registers are from Aberdeen, dating back to 1538.


In a small number of areas (usually the larger burghs) such records can be very detailed, noting the names of the deceased, ages, causes of death, and in some instances genealogical information, such as the name of a father. The majority, however, are not burial records at all, but the details of payments made for the hire of a mortcloth, used to drape over the coffin. These can sometimes be so vague – e.g. 'Widow Smith, 3 shillings' – that it may not even be possible to confirm that the entry is actually for the person to whom you think it might concern.

Additional kirk session records may have further details such as information about the purchase or 'feuing' of lairs, although these tend to anticipate future burials within, rather than record contemporary burials, which may ultimately not have happened as planned for. Kirk session registers have been digitised, and can be viewed at the National Records of Scotland (www.nrscotland.gov.uk) in Edinburgh, but have yet to appear online – it is intended, however, that they will make their way onto ScotlandsPeople in due course. Note that if a family member migrated away from his or her home parish, it was fairly traditional up to the 19th century to be returned to the parish of birth for burial, and so interment may not necessarily be near to where the deceased spent his or her final days.

The Church of Scotland was not the only church in town, however, with many nonconformist Presbyterian factions splitting off from it in the 18th and 19th centuries, as well as other denominations arriving on the scene separately. Many of their records are held at local repositories across the country, such as county record offices or university archives. To locate such records you will need to use online catalogues such as that of the National Records of Scotland or the Scottish Archive Network (www.scan.org.uk), and then visit the institution in question. ScotlandsPeople holds burial records for some Roman Catholic church registers, although coverage is sparse, with just 17,560 burials recorded from 1782-1959.

In addition to the records of church graveyards, municipal cemeteries were also established in much of the country from the 19th century, with some available in searchable databases online. Some pre-1855 burial records from Perth's Greyfriars Cemetery, for example, can be searched online at http://www.pkc.gov.uk/article/3887/Perth-burgh-burial-registers-1794-1855, with another page on the website hosting downloadable cemetery maps for much of Perthshire at http://www.pkc.gov.uk/article/15014/List-of-burial-grounds. In addition to several churchyard registers for Aberdeenshire and Angus, Deceased Online (www.deceasedonline.com) also hosts some records for municipal cemeteries located within the two counties, as well as cremation records from Edinburgh.

Some of the most useful collection of records for Scottish burials are those of transcribed monumental inscriptions, largely collected by members from family history societies across the country. These detail the names of the deceased, the years of birth and death, the names of additional family members buried in the same lair, and in some cases they may even carry short epitaphs. To assist with their location, the Scottish Association of Family History Societies has an extremely useful database available online, at www.safhs.org.uk/burialgrounds.asp, which lists some 3500 known burial grounds in Scotland. Each entry details whether monumental inscriptions have been recorded, if they have been published in any format, and if not, where the unpublished collections may be consulted. The largest collection of monumental inscriptions records in the country is held at the Scottish Genealogy Society at www.scotsgenealogy.com. Note that some family history societies have basic indexes on their websites to burials they hold, which can be consulted in book or CD format – the SAFHS website provides details for each group. Monumental inscription records for Aberdeenshire, Banffshire and Kincardineshire, as transcribed by the Aberdeen and North East Scotland Family History Society, have recently been added to FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk).


There are additional online resources for gravestone inscriptions. A team from Scottish Monumental Inscriptions (www.scottish-monumental-inscriptions.com) is regularly touring around the country to photograph and transcribe headstones, with the records available to purchase on CD, or by download from the site – many of these can also be purchased from the Deceased Online website. Other useful index based sites for burials include Highland Memorial Inscriptions (https://sites.google.com/site/highlandmemorialinscriptions/home), which has records from much of the Highlands, including major cemeteries such as Tomnahurich in Inverness; Find a Grave in Scotland (www.findagraveinscotland.com), with holdings from across the country; and Memento Mori (www.memento-mori.co.uk), with records from Glasgow and much of the Central Belt. Some previously published records, such as interments from Aberdeenshire and Edinburgh, can be found also on Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk), within its UK Parish Baptism, Marriage and Burial Records collection, whilst the Friends of Dundee City Archives (www.fdca.org.uk) hosts several burial collections including one for Dundee's Howff Cemetery and another for Broughty Ferry.

Finally, many Scots also died in times of war. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission website at www.cwgc.org records the known burials of, or places of commemoration for, soldiers killed in both world wars. In addition, original records describing the interment process are also now available for many of those commemorated on the site, noting inscriptions to be added to headstones, and the next of kin with whom the Commission was liaising at the time. Photographs of many of the memorials in Scotland commemorating their sacrifice have been photographed by the Scottish War Memorials Project, and can be freely accessed at http://warmemscot.s4.bizhat.com.

Note that additional resources for Scottish burials can be found on gateway websites such as Cyndi's List (www.cyndislist.com) and GENUKI (www.genuki.org.uk).

(c) Chris Paton


For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Sunday, 13 January 2019

National Archives has January book sale

The National Archives in England (www.nationalarchives.gov.uk) is holding a book sale this January, with up to 70% off on certain titles.

To view the titles available, visit http://bookshop.nationalarchives.gov.uk/11/Bargains-and-offers/.


Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Saturday, 12 January 2019

APG free webinar series for 2019

The Association of Professional Genealogists (https://www.apgen.org) is running a series of free webinars.

Are you interested in a possible career as a professional genealogist? Want to learn how the pros approach genealogy research or tackle tough ethical situations? The APG's live webinars are open free to the public.

The lists of webinars is available at https://www.apgen.org/webinars/, with the first having an Irish flavour:

Share, Connect & Grow: Developing a Content Strategy for Your Genealogy Interests
Presenter: Laura Colleran
Monday, January 21, 2019
2:00p.m. EST

Registration required: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6872865061397542145

Being 'found' on the internet is rarely pure happenstance. It is likely that a person is looking for something specific (content) and undertakes a unique digital journey to find it. Creating content that enables you to engage with your target audience in a meaningful way is a key element of any modern digital marketing strategy. Storytelling, testimonials, partnerships, blogs and guest writers are all part of the content creation plan implemented by Ireland Reaching Out in recent years. This webinar will include information about developing the plan, creating the content, and promoting it online.

About the Presenter: Laura Colleran is the Programme Manager with Ireland Reaching Out, an Irish Diaspora engagement programme, funded by the Department of Foreign Affairs and the Heritage Council of Ireland. A previous member of the Irish Diaspora herself, she moved back to Ireland in 2013, having lived and worked in Italy for 11 years. Her professional background is in advertising and marketing, and she has worked with Ogilvy & Mather, Leo Burnett and Coca-Cola. She has also lectured marketing and brand management at the Institute of European Design in Turin.

NB: For more on Ireland Reaching Out visit https://www.irelandxo.com

(With thanks to the latest Irish Family History Centre Newsletter via email)

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

IrishGenealogy provides civil records update

The IrishGenealogy website (www.irishgenealogy.ie) has provided an update on the further upload of historicIrish based birth, marriage and death records at www.irishgenealogy.ie/en/news/154-update-to-the-civil-records-3:

We are pleased to advise that in early 2019, an additional 2 years of records of births, marriages and deaths will be added to the www.irishgenealogy.ie website. The marriage Index data along with additional images will also be updated for the years 1864-1869 inclusive.

The years covered by the release of the historic records of Births, Marriages and Deaths after this update will be:

Births: 1864 to 1918

Marriages: 1864* to 1943

Deaths: 1878* to 1968

* The General Register Office will continue to work on updating further records of Marriages dating back to 1845 and Deaths dating back to 1864. These will be included in future updates to the records available on the website.

The General Register Office is dealing with the feedback on the records – where records required correction this will be included in this updated release. Further details of this release will be confirmed early in 2019.

(With thanks to Claire Santry @Irish_Genealogy)

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Volunteers sought for Cupar burgh records transcription project

From Fife Family History Society (https://fifefhs.org):

Hidden Burgh: restoring Cupar’s place at the heart of Fife” HELP NEEDED
25 January @ 2:00 pm

The University of St Andrews are involved in the Archives Revealed project “Hidden Burgh: restoring Cupar’s place at the heart of Fife”. It is being financed largely by the Archives Revealed funding programme from The National Archives and the Pilgrim Trust, and will last for one year. The University holds the records for the Cupar Burgh from 1364 to 1975 and the objective is to have them fully catalogued so that they are accessible to everyone. Part of the project involves engagement with the Cupar community, giving the local people the opportunity to be part of the project. With that in mind, the University is looking for volunteers who are interested in being involved in some indexing/transcription projects. It is anticipated that the volunteers will work in a group setting at the Cupar Library using copies of the original records.

If you are interested in being part of this exciting venture, please come along to a meeting at the Cupar Library (Room 14) on Friday 25th January at 2 pm. The Cupar project archivist, Christine Wood, will explain what types of projects are available and what is involved. Anyone who would like to learn more and is keen to take part will be warmly welcomed. If you are not able to attend the meeting on the day but wish to be considered for the volunteering projects, please contact Christine Wood at caw23@st-andrews.ac.uk or telephone 01334 461727/462339.

(Original post at https://fifefhs.org/event/hidden-burgh-restoring-cupars-place-at-the-heart-of-fife-help-needed/)


Further information about the project can be found from the Universaty of St Andrews at https://news.st-andrews.ac.uk/archive/hidden-burgh-restoring-cupars-place-at-the-heart-of-fife/, and from project archivist Christine Wood at https://standrewsrarebooks.wordpress.com/2018/12/06/hidden-burgh-restoring-cupars-place-at-the-heart-of-fife/.

(With thanks to Fife FHS)

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Norfolk Record Office to offer reduced service?

Norfolk County Council has announced proposals to reduce the level of its Norfolk Record Office (www.archives.norfolk.gov.uk) service by one day's closure a week, with reduced hours for the remaining four, as well as one Thursday late opening a month instead of late Thursday opening every week. Further cutbacks are proposed for for educational work, volunteering opportunities and staffing.

A recent cosultation was held at the end of 2018 with details of the proposed changes (https://norfolk.citizenspace.com/consultation/nro/). It stated:

The use of our services, particularly by those becoming older, is growing every year. Demand is rising but the amount of money we receive from central government is declining; we now receive £204 million less each year, compared to 2011/12, and this is also expected to fall to zero by 2020/21.

For more on the story visit https://www.edp24.co.uk/news/politics/norfolk-record-office-opening-hours-and-staff-cutbacks-1-5845874.

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Kent records added to FindmyPast

Latest additions to FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk):

Kent Baptisms
Over 23,000 new records covering Anglican and Wesleyan baptisms in Dover, Gravesend, Higham, Nettlestead and Maidstone have been added to our collection of Kent parish baptisms.

Kent Marriages
Over 22,000 new records covering 9 Anglican parishes in Aylesford, Boxley, Higham and Nettlestead have been added to the collection and are now available to search.

Kent Burials
Over 203,000 additional records covering the former Grange Road Cemetery in Gillingham, now a public open space, Fort Pitt Military Cemetery and the cemetery in Robin Hood Lane, Chatham have been added to the collection.

Boston Pilot Newspaper Information Wanted Ads
Did any of your Irish ancestors emigrate to the United States? Search advertisements placed in the Boston Pilot newspaper by family members and others looking for lost friends and relatives from 1831 to 1920. These records provide an insight into Irish immigration and reflect the tumultuous times that led to the Irish diaspora such as the Great Irish Famine and the United States Civil War.

1939 Register update
Over 53,000 additional 'open' records have been added to the 1939 Register. Since the Register was launched, Findmypast has matched nearly five million 'closed records' to multiple data sources to correctly confirm the date and location of death for individuals recorded.

Devon Social & Institutional Records
Over 76,000 new records have been added to our collection of Devon Social & Institutional Records. Search this extraordinarily rich set of records to find paupers and vagrants, apprentices, peddlers and tradesmen. Find out if they got married, were vaccinated against smallpox or got Christmas presents while their father was fighting WW1. Explore more than two centuries of social history to find rare details of the lives of ordinary people.

British & Irish Newspaper update
Over 119,672 new pages have been added to our collection of historical British & Irish newspapers this week. We have updates to two of our existing titles, Wexford publication the New Ross Standard, and Reach plc (Trinity Mirror) title the Cheshire Observer.

Further details and links at https://blog.findmypast.co.uk/new-records-avaialble-to-2625646944.html

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Friday, 11 January 2019

Extended opening hours for January at NIFHS research centre

From the North of Ireland Family History Society (www.nifhs.org):

NEW: extended opening hours for January 2019 – open 2pm to 8pm Tuesdays & Thursdays.

If you are interested in family and local history, please visit the Randal Gill Library and Research Centre on the outskirts of Belfast. Check maps, church and gravestone records and so much more including free access to FindMyPast. Talk to our volunteers about your family tree. Computers are available and there is free WiFi.

Use of the library is free but a small donation is always welcome.

Cafe on site usually open until mid afternoon. Free parking.

Resources: www.nifhs.org/resources/
Directions and facilities: www.nifhs.org/research-centre/

(With thanks to Suzy Topping via Facebook)

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Thursday, 10 January 2019

TheGenealogist adds Worcestershire baptisms and Wiltshire headstones

From TheGenealogist (www.thegenealogist.co.uk):

More than 144,700 Worcestershire Baptism records added to TheGenealogist and a further 20,000 individuals on Headstones

TheGenealogist is releasing the records of 144,793 individuals added to their Worcestershire Baptisms (in Partnership with Malvern FHS) and an additional 20,000 individuals on headstones from the UKIndexer project where volunteers help their fellow genealogists by indexing and/or photographing the monumental inscriptions in churchyards and cemeteries.
  • Discover dates of ancestors’ baptisms
  • Glean names of parents of those baptised in Worcestershire
  • Headstones give dates and name details of those buried and sometimes familiar relationships
  • Memorials can reveal information not recorded elsewhere for ancestors


Headstones being released this week includes the transcriptions and the images for those at St Giles, Imber (pictured) on Salisbury Plain, useful for those with ancestors buried there as it is only open a few days a year. St Giles' Church is in the deserted village of Imber, Wiltshire and was built in the late 13th or early 14th century. The village falls within the British Army's training grounds on Salisbury Plain and is deserted as a result of the entire civilian population being evicted in 1943 to provide an exercise area for American troops preparing for the invasion of Europe during the Second World War. Once the war came to an end the villagers would have liked to return but were not allowed. The church today is without its pews and its font was moved to Brixton Deverill while the pulpit has been sent to Winterbourne Stoke. St Giles’ seating, bell and two effigies are now housed at Edington Priory. The Church of St Giles is open for visitors and services on specified days of the year when the Ministry of Defence allows access. St Giles is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a Grade I listed building, and is now a redundant church in the care of the Churches Conservation Trust.

These fully searchable records released this week are available now to Diamond subscribers of TheGenealogist.

Read their article: www.thegenealogist.co.uk/featuredarticles/2019/thegenealogist-adds-to-its-headstone-collection-to-reveal-some-fascinating-celebrities-1038/

(With thanks to Nick Thorne)

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Wednesday, 9 January 2019

Ireland launches commemorative Dáil 100 site

2019 is the centenary year for the first Dáil Eireann, the revolutionary Irish parliament which paved the way for the independence of the Irish Free State in 1922.


To commemorate this centenary, the Oireachtas (Ireland's parliamentary legislature) has announced that a dedicated website has now been launched at www.dail100.ie. The site provides a timeline of events from 1919-1921, a list of the first TDs (Ireland's MPs), and upcoming events. In addition, a section of the site, Treasures of the Parliamentary Library, will be coming soon, whilst a section marked National Archives - Digitisation of papers from the early Dáil Éireann, has some sample copies of documents from the first Dáil, which are currently being digitised.

The National Archives of Ireland has announced more on this digitisation work in a tweet at https://twitter.com/NARIreland/status/1082660989034741760, referencing work that it is currently doing on the collections known as DE/2 and DE/4, which includes the negotiation files for the Anglo-Irish Treaty of 1921 (the disputed terms of which confirmed Partition and led to the Civil War), as well as the proceedings of the 1st and 2nd Dáil.

The archive is also hosting an exhibition entitled From Ballots to Bullets: Ireland 1918-1919, until May (see https://www.irishnews.com/news/2018/09/11/news/national-library-to-launch-from-ballots-to-bullets-ireland-1918-1919-exhibition-1429540/).

Further information on the background to the establishment of the first Dáil Eireann is available at https://www.oireachtas.ie/en/visit-and-learn/dail100/.

For a list of other commemorative events this year, visit https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/heritage/diary-of-events-for-2019-commemorations-1.3751110.

(With thanks to @OireachtasNews and @NARIreland)


COMMENT: A quick note to let you know that one of the biggest additions to my revised second edition of Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet is a new chapter on the Decade of Centenaries, and how to research your ancestors who took part in events 100 years ago between 1912 and 1923 from across Ireland.

I completed the first draft of the book today, and will be editing and indexing for the rest of the week - more on its publication soon!

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

RCAHMW enhances Welsh heritage database Coflein

The Royal Commission for the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales (https://rcahmw.gov.uk) has posted a review of changes it made to its Coflein database in 2018.

Coflein, which is accessible at www.coflein.gov.uk, is the body's online database and Inventory of ancient and historical monuments, providing access to hundreds of thousands of heritage based documents. Amongst the enhancements is an overhaul of the Coflein Mapping system, the addition of thousands of aerial photographs across Wales, from recently commissioned aerial surveys, and improved descriptions on many catalogue entries.

To read about the improvements visit https://rcahmw.gov.uk/2018-year-in-review-our-improvements-to-coflein.

(With thanks to the RCAHMW)

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Tuesday, 8 January 2019

Buried in Belfast - Women in the Archives workshop

Details of the latest Women in the Archives workshop programme in Belfast from PRONI (https://nidirect.gov.uk/proni) and the Linen Hall Library (https://linenhall.com):

Women in the Archives

Buried in Belfast Workshop Programme

The Linen Hall Library and the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (PRONI) are bringing forward female voices from the archives through an exciting programme of exhibitions, events and workshops.

Registration is now open for our seven-week Buried in Belfast Workshop Programme.
  • Take part in specially designed tours of Milltown and Belfast City Cemeteries and uncover hidden histories...
  • Get a behind-the-scenes tour of PRONI and a women’s tour of the Linen Hall Library...
  • Develop skills in historical & archival research, story mapping and tour guiding...
  • Interrogate history, the art of writing & tour guiding...
  • Develop trail maps and self-guided tours that showcase the lives of ordinary and extraordinary women...
  • Leave your story for future generations...

Workshop Details:

Programme is open to all genders and backgrounds

Duration: 7 Weeks (23 Jan-07 Mar 2019) - Wed (Group 1) or Thurs (Group 2)

Please book a ticket for either the Wednesday Group or the Thursday Group depending on which day of the week it suits you to attend.

Time: 9.30am-1.30pm

Costs: This is a free workshop programme and places are limited. Early booking is recommended.
To register visit https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/buried-in-belfast-women-in-the-archives-tickets-54282689987

(With thanks to PRONI via Facebook)

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

WDYTYA magazine announces Transcription Tuesday event

From Who Do You Think You Are? magazine:

Volunteers needed to transcribe an Edwardian book of railway accidents in a day

Researchers from the University of Portsmouth, the Modern Records Centre and the National Railway Museum (NRM) are looking for volunteers to help transcribe a book of railway worker accidents spanning 1901–1907 in just 24 hours. The project is one of three that have been chosen as part of Who Do You Think You Are? Magazine’s annual Transcription Tuesday event, which this year takes place on 5 February 2019.

Transcription Tuesday was launched in 2017 by Who Do You Think You Are? Magazine, to encourage family and local historians to get involved in transcription projects. “The internet has transformed family history,” said editor Sarah Williams, “but the documents that are going online need to be transcribed or indexed to make them searchable, and for many projects the only way that is going to happen is with the help of volunteers.”

One of the projects chosen for Transcription Tuesday this year is the Railway Work, Life and Death project (railwayaccidents.port.ac.uk), and its organisers have set a challenge to the Transcription Tuesday volunteers – to transcribe an entire 119-page volume of railway worker accidents in a day. Each page has, on average, 18 accidents reported, meaning that by the end of the day about 2,150 records could be available for future family historians to discover details of their railway worker ancestors.

“Accidents to railway workers were sadly common at the start of the 20th century, with around 15,000 deaths and injuries each year,” said Dr Mike Esbester of the University of Portsmouth, co-leader of the project. “This volume was created by the Amalgamated Society of Railway Servants, the biggest railway trade union [known today as the RMT], to record accidents and legal cases involving its members. Until Transcription Tuesday it was only available in hard copy, at the Modern Records Centre at the University of Warwick, which meant it was rarely consulted. Transcribing it will hugely increase its use.”

Other records being indexed on Transcription Tuesday are Warwickshire witness statements from the county’s quarter sessions with Warwickshire Bytes and a range of parish registers in association with FamilySearch. “This year we want to make Transcription Tuesday the biggest yet,” said Sarah Williams. “We hope to see hundreds, if not thousands, of volunteers from across the world join together and give something back to family history.”

To find out more about the day, the projects and how to get involved visit: www.whodoyouthinkyouaremagazine.com/transcriptiontuesday

Sample page from the railway accidents book that volunteers will transcribe on 
Transcription Tuesday 2019 
(Modern Records Centre)


Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Monday, 7 January 2019

ScotlandsPeople releases annual update of historic civil registration records

ScotlandsPeople (www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk) has released its annual update of civil registration records, with historic records now available online for births in 1918, marriages in 1943 and deaths in 1968.

The additions comprise of 98,554 Scottish births, 38,271 marriages, and 63,311 deaths.

An article discussing the new release is available at www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk/article/our-records-muriel-spark-and-scottish-births-1918.

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

AGRA recognises University of Dundee genealogy courses qualifications

From AGRA (www.agra.org.uk):

AGRA recognises University of Dundee Family History qualifications in Membership & Associate applications

The University of Dundee’s post-graduate qualifications in Family and Local History are the latest to be recognised by AGRA. This applies to all three levels of post-graduate qualification in Family and Local History offered by Dundee University’s Centre for Archive and Information Studies (CAIS), with a requirement that students must have taken the “Skills and Sources for Family & Local History in England” module as one of their course options.

This means that Dundee graduates, working professionally in genealogy, can now apply for AGRA Membership by submitting just one example of client work, rather than three. This is the same as the arrangements already in place for holders of similar Post-Graduate qualifications from Strathclyde University, the Higher Certificate of the Institute of Heraldic and Genealogical Studies, and Pharos Tutors/Society of Genealogists’ Advanced Skills Certificate.

Applicants for Membership of AGRA must, however, still undergo further rigorous scrutiny by completing a research assignment and attending an interview with AGRA’s Board of Assessors. These requirements set the Association aside from similar bodies and ensure that members are the best in the field.

Antony Marr, chair of the Board of Assessors, said: “Discussions have been ongoing for some time about how these Dundee University qualifications could sit in our assessment process, and AGRA is delighted that this has now been resolved.”

Caroline Brown, Programme Leader for the Family and Local History Programmes at the University of Dundee, said “We are delighted that our courses have been recognised by AGRA and that our students will have the chance to join a professional organisation that recognises expertise in this area.”

Information about the process of joining AGRA and how completion of various genealogy courses affects AGRA Membership requirements is available at: https://www.agra.org.uk/join

Information about the CAIS courses at the University of Dundee can be found here: www.dundee.ac.uk/cais/programmes/familylocalhistory

(With thanks to Angela Aldam)

UPDATE: I've been advised the Dundee link is currently not working - an alternative link on Dundee family history courses is available at https://www.dundee.ac.uk/cais/programmes/postgraduatecourses/familylocalhistory/ although the postgraduate courses option is temporarily disabled.

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

New hours at the RCB Library in Dublin from February

The Dublin based Representative Church Body Library (www.ireland.anglican.org/about/rcb-library), which hosts records from the Anglican based Church of Ireland, has announced new opening hours from February, as follows:

Commencing in February 2019, members of the public are advised that access to the Archives and Manuscripts Collections in the Library is restricted to four days per week: Monday to Thursday.

Opening hours remain the same: 9.30am to 1.00pm and 2.00pm to 5.00pm with last orders for manuscripts and archives at 4.30pm each evening (Mon–Thurs) but going forward there will be NO access to Archives and Manuscripts on Fridays.

This will allow us to consolidate limited staff time, and facilitate our work on digitization.

Access to the Printed Collection for ordinands, clergy and Library Members is not affected by this change, with the Printed Collections being available five days per week, and Library services for books remain unchanged.

For further information please contact

(If you would like to contribute to the RCB Library Conservation Fund, please click here.)
Dr Susan Hood

Librarian and Archivist
RCB Library
Braemor Park
Churchtown
Dublin 14
01 492 3979

library@ireland.anglican.org

With thanks to via Twitter - original RCBL announcement at https://www.ireland.anglican.org/news/8546/new-public-access-times-for

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.