Wednesday, 21 June 2017

My WDYTYA article on free online Scottish genealogy resources

Who Do You Think You Are? magazine has published online the first part of my article detailing the top 50 resources available for Scottish genealogy and family history research online. The online presentation notes the first 17 resources, and can be freely read at www.whodoyouthinkyouaremagazine.com/blog/17-best-free-online-scottish-resources.

For the full article, please seek out July's edition of the magazine, available at all good newsagents, or at http://www.whodoyouthinkyouaremagazine.com/issue/july-2017.


Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Tuesday, 20 June 2017

TheGenealogist adds York Colour Tithe Maps and Yorkshire Directories

From TheGenealogist (www.thegenealogist.co.uk):

TheGenealogist releases York Colour Tithe Maps and Yorkshire Directories.

TheGenealogist is very pleased to announce the release of the City of York and Ainsty Colour Tithe Maps, plus another significant batch of Yorkshire directories released in time for the Yorkshire Family History Show at York Racecourse.

To coincide with the return of one of the largest family history events in England, at the Knavesmire Exhibition Centre at the York Racecourse on the 24th of June and which is sponsored by TheGenealogist, today sees the release of a set of new records for York.

TheGenealogist has just added the colour tithe maps that cover the City of York and Ainsty to its National Tithe Records collection to compliment the gray scale maps and apportionment books that are already live. In addition it has released another 23 residential and commercial directory books to its ever expanding collection of Trade, Residential and Telephone Directories to help those with Yorkshire ancestors find their addresses.

The fully searchable records released online will allow researchers to:

● Find plots of land owned or occupied by ancestors in early Victorian York and Ainsty on colour maps

● See where your forebears lived, farmed or perhaps occupied a small cottage or a massive estate.

● Discover addresses of ancestors before, between and after the years covered by the census in the Trade, Residential and Telephone Directories. (1735-1937)

● Uncover details of the neighbourhood and understand communication links to other towns where your stray ancestor may have moved to.


TheGenealogist’s National Tithe Record Collection covers all counties of England and Wales and so can be used to find where your English and Welsh ancestors lived at the time that this great survey took place between 1837 and the mid 1850s. The Trade, Residential & Telephone directories also encompass the whole country and can be useful both as research tool and as a valuable insight into the lives of our ancestors. They are a useful resource for tracing ancestors, particularly if they had a distinctive trade and can be used as a census substitute for the years prior to 1841 or after 1911 and also to provide information on their whereabouts between census years.

For anyone with Yorkshire ancestors this new release from TheGenealogist adds colour to the story of where their family lived. To search these and the vast number of other records covering the country see more at https://www.thegenealogist.co.uk.

(With thanks to Nick Thorne)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Congratulations to Maureen Selley!

A belated congratulations to everyone's favourite Time Lady, Maureen Selley, on being awarded a British Empire Medal in the most recent Honours list, for "Services to Local History".

Maureen has been a long running volunteer with Devon Family History Society (www.devonfhs.org.uk), of which she is the current Secretary and a former Chairman. She's also a bundle of fun, and thoroughly dedicated to helping others with their family history pursuits - and more importantly, for this particular genie, a fellow Whovian!  I've had the pleasure to meet and chat with Maureen on several occasions in recent years, both at Who Do You Think You Are Live? events, and in Portugal at the Lost Cousins conferences in 2014 and 2015, and this is most certainly a thoroughly deserved recognition by the state for all of her past and continuing efforts.

The formal announcement is available in the London Gazette at https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/61962/supplement/B31.

Well done Maureen!

(With thanks to Wendy Archer at Oxfordshire FHS)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Monday, 19 June 2017

Forces War Records - genealogy discounts page

Forces War Records has a genealogy discounts page, allowing you to gain discounts on subscriptions to various UK based family history services and magazine subscriptions. Included in the offer are discounts to TheGenealogist Diamond subscripiton, as well as discounts for subscriptions to Family Tree and Who Do You Think You Are magazine subscriptions.



To access the discounts page, visit https://www.forces-war-records.co.uk/genealogy-discounts.

(With thanks to Jennifer Holmes)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Free University of Strathclyde genealogy course

The University of Strathclyde is about to start its free genealogy MOOC (massive open online course) for the fourth time - here's the blurb:

Genealogy: Researching Your Family Tree

This free online course offered by the University of Strathclyde and FutureLearn will help you develop an understanding of basic genealogy techniques and how to communicate your family history. Starts the 3rd of July and runs for 6 weeks. The course has recently been updated to include more information on autosomal (or ‘cousin matching’) DNA testing. So far more than 50,000 students worldwide have participated!

Learn more and sign up at: https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/genealogy

(With thanks to Tahitia McCabe)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

200 years of Jewish communities in Scotland

A quick plug for a series of local talks this week by Michael Tobias to commemorate 200 years of Jewish communities in Scotland. The talks are being held as follows:

Dunfermline - Monday 19th June, 6.30pm
Falkirk - Tuesday 20th, 6.30pm
Ayr - Thursday 22nd, 6.30pm

For further details call 077245 49817, email events@scojec.org or visit www.scojec.org/events.html.



(With thanks to @SCoJeC)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Applying for an Irish passport

Today the Brexit negotiation process finally got underway. As someone personally appalled at the prospect of being taken out of the EU against my will, and as someone who has long struggled with my identity (as to whether I am British or Irish), I finally exercised my right last year to apply for Irish passports for myself and my two sons. We now have dual citizenship, confirming our Irish connection as well as our UK one, and maintaining EU access and rights for myself and my two boys. (I appreciate others may have a different view!)



The Belfast Telegraph is noting that the number of applications for Irish passports is not slowing up, with 833 applicants on one day alone in March (see http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/northern-ireland/833-irish-passport-applications-from-ni-in-a-day-35839433.html). Over the course of my own application I blogged a series of posts detailing the process (as an applicant in Scotland), including what ancestral connections qualify you to apply for a passport, and which genealogical records you may need for the process. If you too are interested in obtaining an Irish passport, my posts are still available at http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/2016/06/claiming-irish-passport-1.html - links to subsequent posts are at the end of the first article.

Good luck if you choose to go for it!


Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

The spelling of Irish townlands in deeds

I've been doing quite a bit of personal research over the last few weeks using the Irish Registry of Deeds records which are now available on FamilySearch at https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/185720. They are a fascinating resource, and although I have occasionally used the microfilm copies of the records in the past at PRONI in Belfast, the digitised returns make research much easier, with the records themselves much easier to read off a screen than on a microfilm reader!

Although some deeds have been indexed by the ongoing Registry of Deeds project at http://irishdeedsindex.net, the majority have not, and you need to work through the land indexes or name indexes manually, before consulting the relevant deeds memorials. Amongst my latest finds, I've discovered an original deed recorded by the Irish Land Commission noting the purchase of Killonerry Farm, Co. Kilkenny, by my wife's widowed great great grandmother Bridget Prendergast from the Earl of Bessborough in May 1892. The mortgage was for £2650, on interest of 'three and one eighth per cent', to be paid back over 49 years. The record also notes that the farm had previously been leased from the Earl's estate by her husband Thomas Prendergast in May 1868 for 31 years, although additional evidence from other sources (the Munster Express, and tithe records) confirms the family had held the property from much earlier in the 1820s.

I've written a detailed article on how to use the online version of these records for a forthcoming edition of Your Family History magazine, but I thought I would flag up something here that might help with Irish research across the board, and that is the complete lack of standardisation in Irish townland names that you might come across. Another branch of my wife's family also had a farm in a separate townland called Tybroughney, in Co. Kilkenny. When you Google the name 'Tybroughney' today, the returns will usually add the phrase 'statutory spelling Tibberaghny (Irish: Tiobra Fhachna)'. But don't for one moment think that that means there were two spelling variants for Tybroughney. In fact, if you look through the land index for the register of deeds, this is the sort of response you might get for various placenames..!



This is a short list from one of the compiled indexes, but there are other indexed years where there are even more variants listed for Tybroughney - the moral of the story here is to think laterally about the spelling of Irish place names when you go looking in the records, especially those for which they can't even agree on the spelling today!

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

The weeding of Scottish court records

The National Records of Scotland (www.nrscotland.gov.uk) has published an interesting blog post about the process of 'weeding' records that it collects each year from Scotland's sheriff courts.

Whilst all court registers are kept and preserved, not all original court files are retained, only those which have "historical, evidential or informational values". This is why in some cases, whilst you may find an initial summary record of a historic civil case, for example, the original case files themselves may not be available to consult at an archive. Weeding happens in many archives, across a range of record types, in order to save space within archives, and in many cases to actually make the research process easier (removing duplicates and unnecessary suport materials). Of course, from a genealogist's point of view, there may be a very different interpretation of what constitutes "historical, evidential or informational value" to what the state decides!

For more on the NRS story, visit the blog post by Jennifer Homewood, of the SCTS/NRS National Sheriff Court Records Survey, at https://blog.nrscotland.gov.uk/2017/06/19/weeding-scotlands-courts/.

The full policy on the weeding of court records by the NRS is also available online at https://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/record-keeping/records-policies/selection-of-court-and-legal-records-policy.

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Wednesday, 14 June 2017

National Library of Scotland updates Curious Travellers map

The National Library of Scotland (www.nls.uk) has updated its Curious Travellers map at http://curioustravellers.ac.uk/map/, to allow users a chance to follow in the footsteps of Johnson and Boswell as they toured around the country in 1773.



The four-year project was launched in September 2014 by the University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh and Celtic Studies (CAWCS) and the University of Glasgow, with its priorty being the writings of Flintshire naturalist and antiquarian Thomas Pennant (1726-1798), who travelled across both Scotland and wales and recorded his observations along the way.

For more on the Curious Travellers project, visit http://curioustravellers.ac.uk/en/.

(With thanks to @natlibscotmaps)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

1 million First World War hospital records on Forces War Records

From Forces War Records (www.forces-war-records.co.uk):

WW1 Hospital Records collection has now reached 1 Million!
Exclusive to Forces War Records - the specialist military genealogy website



These records have been painstakingly transcribed, directly from the original Military Hospital records in the National Archives, so you won't find these anywhere else online. The original documents were handwritten, often barely readable, but the Forces War Records UK based transcription team of 70+ experts (pictured below) worked for 2 years to decipher it and get the data online, making it easy for this collection to be searched, simply by name.

Why search our Hospital Records? In some cases these records may be the only existing proof for those researching, that their WW1 ancestors fought in the war. They'll show what he was treated for and where he went after he was patched up (or not!).

Further details at https://www.forces-war-records.co.uk/military-hospital-records

(With thanks to Jennifer Holmes)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Tuesday, 13 June 2017

Historic European traveller writings in Wales

The Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales (https://rcahmw.gov.uk/) has partnered with Bangor University and the University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh and Celtic Studies (CAWCS) to create a digital resource to showcase 18th and 19th century travel writings of European travellers to Wales, and to use these to permit ‘virtual visits’. This new project builds on the recent uncovering of 400 accounts of visits to Wales by European travellers between 1750 and 2010, as part of an earlier research project.

According to the announcement, many of the featured texts to be made available are in French and German, , with additonal accounts from travellers from Poland, Hungary, Scandinavia and the Czech Republic.

For more on the story, please visit https://rcahmw.gov.uk/european-travellers-a-new-view-on-historic-tourism-to-wales/

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Family Tree magazine - family history survey

Let's have a wee natter! 😃

How do you feel about the family history scene just now? How healthy is the family history world, what activities, products, events, etc work for the family historian, and what doesn't? What would you like to see change in the near future - and what should stay the same?

For several years now I have been writing for the UK's longest running genealogy magazine, Family Tree (https://www.family-tree.co.uk), and yesterday I was contacted by the team and asked if I could perhaps fill out a short survey being sent out to various folk who work in the industry. I was more than happy to do so, but in discussion with the editor, Helen, I suggested it might be a conversation that readers of this blog might also wish to participate in. I'm glad to say that the offer has been taken up!

Whether you're an active family historian, a relative newbie, or someone who works in the variety of areas connected to the ancestral world, please take a few moments if you can to contribute to Family Tree's survey at the following link: https://www.research.net/r/Y78QM8H.

As Helen suggests, this is an opportunity to "mull over the future of family history and think of ways we can continue it as the fab hobby it is". In due course, I'll ask Helen to comment on some of the findings, and we'll publish some of your comments on this blog!  

Let us know what you think - and please do share the link to anyone you know who might be willing to add their thoughts!


(With thanks to Helen Tovey)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Monday, 12 June 2017

Bengal Army European Soldiers database on FIBIS

From the Families in British India Society (www.fibis.org):

Transcribed entries for nearly 10,000 soldiers have been uploaded to the FIBIS database website. The details come from the Registers of Bengal Army European Soldiers for 1790-1839 (IOR/L/MIL/10/122-123) in the India Office Records at the British Library, The registers give full personal details of enlisted men, including casualties, in a rougly alphabetical arrangement in date order of arrival in Bengal. They were compiled at East India House, mainly from the Muster Rolls.

The database can be searched at https://search.fibis.org/frontis/bin/aps_browse_sources.php?mode=browse_components&id=1135&s_id=340

(With thanks to Valmay Young)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Thursday, 8 June 2017

Permission granted to visit Australia!

My visa has now been granted to visit Australia in August, to participate in the Unlock the Past sponsored Researching Abroad talks roadshow (http://www.unlockthepast.com.au/events/researching-abroad-finding-british-isles-and-european-ancestors).

I'm very much looking forward to my return to Australia and New Zealand - my fifth trip now to Oz (fourth with UTP), and my second to see my Kiwi friends. See you all soon in a few weeks time!


Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Tuesday, 6 June 2017

British Newspaper Archive approaches half way point

Congratulations to the British Newspaper Archive (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) as it approaches its halfway stage as a project, having almost reached 20 million pages of newspaper content (19,947,210 pages at time of writing), out of a proposed 40 million pages over a ten year period.

The following collections and years have been added over the last seven days (including a potentially useful Londonderry Sentinel for my research!):


Roscommon Messenger
1910, 1915-1919

Glasgow Evening Citizen
1867, 1869, 1882, 1884, 1887-1888, 1892

Oswestry Advertiser
1855, 1870

Londonderry Sentinel
1862-1868, 1875, 1883, 1893, 1895-1899, 1901-1907, 1909, 1930-1940

Hartlepool Northern Daily Mail
1900-1909, 1911-1919

Norfolk News
1871-1897, 1899-1910

Cornish Times
1860, 1877

Oxford Times
1888, 1890, 1892, 1894

The People
1918

Sunday Mirror
1914

West Somerset Free Press
1872

Weston-super-Mare Gazette, and General Advertiser
1878-1886, 1888-1896, 1898-1900, 1903-1907

Weston Mercury
1885-1896, 1899-1909

Lake's Falmouth Packet and Cornwall Advertiser
1873-1910

Cricket and Football Field
1910

Isle of Wight Observer
1888, 1901-1907, 1910-1919

Eastern Morning News
1886, 1888

Boston Guardian
1930-1936

Mayo Constitution
1872

Public Ledger and Daily Advertiser
1902-1910

Fraserburgh Herald and Northern Counties' Advertiser
1893-1936, 1938-1944, 1946-1949, 1951-1957

Pateley Bridge & Nidderdale Herald
1883-1888, 1890-1894, 1896, 1898, 1900-1904

Isle of Wight County Press and South of England Reporter
1903-1910

Annandale Observer and Advertiser
1873, 1886, 1893, 1895

Wiltshire Times and Trowbridge Advertiser
1883-1888, 1890-1893

Barnet Press
1897

Chris

UPDATE: And we're now there!


My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Monday, 5 June 2017

The forgotten Irish Census of 1813-15

The first decennial census carried out in Ireland was in 1821, correct?

Not exactly!

There was a previous census carried out in Ireland before that, between 1813-1815, but it was so poorly executed that it was never presented to Parliament. When some statistical findings from it were published a few years later in 1822, they were deemed to be completely unreliable.

The following questions were those required to be asked under the provisions of the Census of Ireland Act 1812:

1st. How many Inhabited Houses are there in your Parish, Barony, or Half Barony; and by how many Families are they occupied?

2nd. How many Houses are now building, and therefore not yet inhabited?

3d. How many other Houses are uninhabited?

4th. What Number of Families in your Parish, Barony, or Half Barony, are chiefly employed in and maintained by Agriculture; how many Families are chiefly employed in or maintained by Trade, Manufactures, or Handicraft; and, how many Families are not comprized in either of the Two preceding Classes?

N.B. The Total Number of Families in Answer to this Question, must correspond with the Number of Families in Answer to the 1st Question.

5th. How many Persons (including Children of whatever age) are there actually found within the Limits of your Parish, Barony, or Half Barony, at the Time of taking this Account; distinguishing Males and Females, and exclusive of Men actually serving in His Majesty's Regular Forces, or in the Militia, and exclusive of Seamen either in His Majesty's Service, or belonging to Registered Vessels?

6th. How many of the whole Number of Persons mentioned by you in Answer to the 5th Question, are Inhabitants of any City, Town, or Village, distinguishing the Number which are found in each City, Town or Village respectively?

7th. Are there any other Matters which you may think it necessary to remark, in Explanation of your Answers to any of the preceding Questions?


The full text of the census act is available online at http://histpop.org/ohpr/servlet/AssociatedView?path=Browse&active=yes&mno=4028&assoctitle=Census%20of%20Ireland,%201813&assocpagelabel=.

For more on the story of the census itself, visit http://histpop.org/ohpr/servlet/View?path=Browse/Essays%20(by%20kind)/Census/Ireland&active=yes&mno=2038.

Just another tragic census story from Ireland *sigh*.

The Irish authorities got their act together by 1821, producing a much more detailed decennial census than its British equivalent. Unfortunately, unlike Britain, later generations made a complete dogs dinner of preserving the records, with the earliest complete Irish census to survive being that of 1901. For those fragments that have survived before 1901, as well as the 1901 and 1911 returns, visit www.census.nationalarchives.ie.

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

London Metropolitan Archive - June events

Some forthcoming events at London Metropolitan Archives:

The Londoners - portrait of a working city, c1447-1980
Exhibition runs until 5 July 2017

Hundreds of thousands of faces - images of born Londoners and more transient visitors - are preserved forever in our collections.
Winners, losers, the famous or the forgotten, countless Londoners have been recorded as they went about their work in the capital.
From studied portraits to casual snapshots, from 15th century drawings to recent colour photographs, the archive brings them all together and presents them as the history of our capital city.

Free - during normal LMA opening hours.



The Londoners: Exhibition Tour with the Curator

Join us for a tour of our current exhibition of images of Londoners. Encounter artists and aldermen, loungers and labourers, at home, in the street, or in the studio.

Free - drop in sessions will be running on the following dates:

Thursday 8 June, 6 - 6.30 pm.
Tuesday 13 June, 1 - 1.20 pm.
Thursday 22 June, 1 - 1.20 pm.


A visit to Conservation
Thursday 22 June, 2 - 3 pm.

Meet members of the Conservation team and find out about the essential work which preserves our records for future generations.

Free - booking essential.


Deciphering Old Handwriting (Advanced)
Thursday 15 June, 5.30 - 7 pm.

This practical session gives expert help in reading different types of handwriting from the 16th and 17th centuries. You will practice with copy documents from LMA's collections and get tips for deciphering early historical writing. Some experience of reading historical documents is required.

£8 - booking essential. See https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/deciphering-old-handwriting-advanced-tickets-32619444637


Making the most of your trip to LMA

Every month, we run a selection of training sessions for LMA users to enhance your research. Whether you're new to archives or a seasoned visitor, you may still find these sessions useful!

We run sessions most months on the following topics:
  • Getting started at LMA
  • Handling documents
  • Family History starter sessions
  • Understanding old handwriting

LGBTQ History Club
Wednesday 7 June, 6 - 7.30 pm.

A regular monthly meeting to explore lesbian, gay, trans, bisexual and queer histories.

Keep up to date with the programme here: www.facebook.com/lgbthistory.


Photography and Film in the Archives Group
Tuesday 20 June, 5.30 - 7.30 pm.

Join us for a monthly series of talks, document viewings and discussions about photographic archives, collections and histories.

Free - drop in session.


More details on the above, plus further events, are outlined at http://mailchi.mp/cityoflondon/may-events-at-london-metropolitan-archives-812969

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Geniarts kickstarter - family trees as art

Occasionally I get an email with something just a little different that catches my eye, and today was no different, with a message from Brussels based Geniarts (www.geniarts.com). The firm is seeking to raise €55,000 through a crowdfunder campaign at https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/geniarts/geniartscom-when-a-family-tree-becomes-art.


Here's the blurb:

For more than 5 years Geniarts has been developing the next generation of family tree templates, by creating a website dedicated to contemporary artists who imagine new family tree templates.

In three simple steps, your family tree becomes the heart of a work of art !

The bottom line is that the company is seeking to create a new series of family tree style templates that can be displayed as art, but to do so it needs to raise the Kickstarter money by Mon, July 3 2017 6:19 PM BST. You can pledge money to purchase one of the designs at a certain size, depending on your budget - if all of the money is raised, you'll get the design you've pledged for, and if not, you won't, and no money will go to the project.

There's also a wee video to go with it:



(This is also available at https://youtu.be/cKl2jp16cm0)

I'm not sure if this is quite my thing, but it may very well be your kind of thing - and I am very much a member of the 'God loves a trier' school of thought!  So do take a look, see if it is up your street, and in the meantime, good luck to the Geniarts team!

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Saturday, 3 June 2017

PRONI stakeholder forum report from Belfast

Yesterday (Friday June 2nd) I attended the regular stakeholder forum for the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (www.nidirect.gov.uk/proni) in beautiful Belfast. The following is a quick summary of recent developments at the archive.

We first heard from Lorraine Bourke on cataloguing. Work continues on the papers of the Brabazon Sharpe family of Galway and Mayo, which are being catalogued under D4523, and also on the Northern Ireland Women's Football Association records from 1973-1993. Another major new accession is a series of posters collected by Northern Ireland civil rights activist, and amateur historian and archivist, Fred Heatley, who died earlier this year. These document a range of political issues over the years on everything from elections in the province to the hunger strikes, and are being catalogued under D4629. Papers from the Belfast Co-Op Society's former York Street premises, including admin records, photos, etc. have been acquired, and these are being catalogued under D3895.

Another interesting project is work in progress to preserve the Prisons Memory Archive of about 175 walk and talk oral history interviews of from people who were at the Maze/Long Kesh, and Armagh prisons, including staff, chaplains, prisoners. This is a collaboration between PRONI, Queen's University and the Prisons Management Group, which as  Heritage Lottery Funded project was formally launched on March 29th. Posts are currently being filled to get this underway, but the plan is to work on 12 recordings a month, and to have them available for consultation in due course at the archive, and posisbly at relevant access hubs across the country.

We had a brief update also on plans to update the catalogue inside the archive (not the online version), with regards to accessing digitised holdings, such as some church records. One of the key points made about the length of time it takes to catalogue and make materials available for consultation was the lack of metadata that is supplied by those making deposits to the archive, which the archive has to address. Metadata is 'data about data' - e.g, you might gift a photograph to PRONI, but who is depcited within the photograph? That's the metadata bit!

Janet Hancock then gave us an overview of PRONI's plans to seek UK archive accreditation during 2017/18. This involves aspiring to reach key standards of work practice in three areas, namely  longevity, collections care, and stakeholder engagement, and essentially helps the archive to focus on which areas it needs to perhaps concentrate more on, and to recognise which areas it is already making good progress in. If PRONI achieves this accreditation, its standards would then be re-evaluated again every three years, to keep pushing for better practice. Anyone who holds an archive can apply for such accreditation.

We were informed that there is a possibility that the archive might seek to install library editions of some of the more popular genealogy websites. I asked how popular the usage of the four GENI (https://geni.nidirect.gov.uk) platforms at PRONI have been since they were made available - the system that allows you to search for the GRONI's birth, marriage and death events from Northern Ireland. The terminals (see below for a pic of the area where they are located) have been quite popular, particularly for those seeking post-Partition Northern Ireland records, which are not available on the free Irish Genealogy (www.irishgenealogy.ie) site, as well earlier pre-1922 records not yet available on the southern hosted platform. There are no plans to increase the number of terminals - not only has the IrishGenealogy site making many records available for free taken some pressure off expected demand, the new GRONI search room at Stranmillis is also now up and running. Four seems to be a good number at PRONI, so everyone's happy!

Stephen Scarth also updated us on the latest communications developments, the biggest development being PRONI's new Facebook site (see http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/2017/05/proni-is-now-on-facebook.html). The plan is to try to put out posts at least a couple of times a day, on a range of things from news to interesting features from the archive. One other change which some may already have been advised of by email is that those who subscribe to the PRONI Express, the archive's newsletter, will have to re-subscribe, due to an update of the system. The plan is for this to become a monthly newsletter, and not so ad hoc - though Janet also advised that they weren't averse to still throwing in the occasional ad hoc edition!

Some other changes include a desire to try to produce four main 'headline events' per year at the archive, such as the current series of lectures commemorating the Messines in the First World War. If attending events at the archive, from now on you will need to book via Eventbrite.

Finally, we were taken on a tour behind the scenes of the archive's reprographics department, where we were told how some items were digitally enhanced or restored (and catalogued as a new item), as well as some of the work the department does to produce promotional materials for exhibitions, and projects such as the then and now photographic image mixes of key locations across time.



And below is a wee sneaky glimpse of the conservation area, which I snapped as I passed it...!



A great day in Belfast - topped off by my finally finding a record in the Registry of Deeds that actually concerns my family!

Visit Belfast - ye'll love it! :)




(With thanks to Stephen and the staff at PRONI)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Thursday, 1 June 2017

Ancestry adds Canadian Fenian Raids bounty applications

Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk) has added a new Canadian dataset which may be of interest to those with an interest in Ireland's 19th century overseas attempts to repeal the union with Britain by force:

Canada, Fenian Raids Bounty Applications, 1866-1871
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=61221
Source: Fenian Raids Bounty Applications, 1866-1871. Record Group 9. Library and Archives Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

From the site:

About Canada, Fenian Raids Bounty Applications, 1866-1871

This database consists of bounty applications for veterans having served during the Fenian Raids of 1866 to 1871 in Canada.

Between 1866 and 1871, the Fenian Brotherhood, Irish nationalists based in the United States, launched raids against Canada in an effort to force the British government to withdraw from Ireland. The raids took place at Campobello Island, New Brunswick; Ridgeway, Ontario; along the Quebec/US border at Eccles Hill and Huntingdon; and in 1871, an attempt was made to invade the province of Manitoba. To combat the Fenian threat, the Canadian Militia in both Ontario and Quebec was called out on several occasions, often for only a few days at a time. The Fenian scare was so widespread in British North America that the Nova Scotia Militia was also called out from time to time, although no raid took place in the colony.

Decades later, the federal government decided that all those who participated in the defence of Canada during the Fenian raids (and who were still living) would be provided a grant or bounty of $100 upon application under the terms of the Fenian Raid Volunteer Bounty Act (1912).

This database consists of lists of names, applications (2 sided), both allowed and disallowed, for the bounty as well as some records relating to pensions for those who were wounded, taken ill or killed while on active duty.

Application details available may include:

Name of Veteran
Muster Date
Muster Place
Discharge Date
Battalion

To see subsequent pages for possible statements by witnesses and comrades: press the arrow right to go to the next page.

Browse lists of names for Nova Scotia claims which are also included in Vol’s 28-38.

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Trumped in attempts to acquire a Coat of Arms

The New York Times is reporting an update to an old heraldic story, that the Court of the Lord Lyon (www.lyon-court.com) in Scotland challenged Donald Trump over his intentions to use a coat of arms on his Scottish golf courses. The Lyon Court's intervention forced a change to the design in 2012 that the US president wished to use.

The update is as follows:

"By 2012, when the golf course in Aberdeenshire opened, the new coat of arms had appeared. The same one is used at Mr. Trump’s course in Ayrshire, on Scotland’s west coast, which he bought in 2014. That year, Mr. Trump trademarked the redesigned emblem.

"Britain’s trademark office would not initially acknowledge the earlier application by Mr. Trump. It provided a copy last month only after The New York Times made a Freedom of Information request, and would not say why the application was rejected, citing a law restricting its ability to release information.

"The College of Arms, which oversees coats of arms in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, provided more detail. The emblem originally submitted in 2007 by Mr. Trump to Britain’s trademark office matched one that had been granted to Mr. Davies, an American of Welsh descent who once served as ambassador to the Soviet Union."


The coat of arms that the American president wished to use had previously been granted in 1939 to Joseph Edward Davies. The only difference was that the Trump organisation apparently changed the motto from "Integritas" (Latin for "integrity") to the much more imaginitive err.... "Trump".

A key point here for genealogists is that the use of someone else's coat of arms in Scotland is a breach of the law, effectively amounting to theft, and for which you can be prosecuted by the Court of the Lord Lyon, which has its own procurator fiscal (public prosecutor). The College of Arms (www.college-of-arms.gov.uk) in England also sets rules for armorial issues, although it does not have its own public prosecutor.

The full New York Times story is at https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/28/business/trump-coat-of-arms.html?_r=0.


Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Wednesday, 31 May 2017

Scottish Jewish Archives Centre Open Day

If you have Jewish ancestral connections in Scotland...

Scottish Jewish Archives Centre Open Day
11 June at 14:00–16:00
Garnethill Synagogue, 129 Hill Street, G3 6UB Glasgow
www.sjac.org.uk

A chance to see the Archives fascinating collections of documents, images and artefacts which reflect the experiences of the Jewish Community in Scotland over 200 years. See our Timeline and Displays Room and visit the beautiful Grade1 listed Garnethill Synagogue

Free admission.

(With thanks to https://www.facebook.com/events/247751868962187)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Recent PRONI cataloguing and records digitisation

I'm looking forward to attending my first PRONI (www.nidirect.gov.uk/proni) user forum meeting in Belfast on Friday, having missed the last couple of meetings. I've just received the minutes form the last meeting, and thought it would be worth sharing the news on recent cataloguing and digitisation initatives at the archive:

Church records to be digitised:

Dromore Cathedral – four registers, the earliest of which is a combined register dating from 1784-1816. [Also individual birth, marriage and burial register dating from 1816 up to 1845/1853]. PRONI already holds copies of the registers on mmicrofilm but the quality of the reels has deteriorated over the years.

St George’s Parish Church – 4 baptism registers dating from 1817-1880.

St Mary Magdalene’s Church, Donegall Pass, has deposited 3 registers with PRONI dating from 1847-1871, vestry minutes and a register of vestry men with us.

St Aidan’s Parish Church, Blythe Street, deposited marriage registers for Christ Church dating from 1855-1875.

St Andrew’s marriage register (1870-1889) and three workhouse baptismal registers dating from 1886-1903; 1903-1922 and 1922-1933.

St Luke’s Parish Church, Mullaglass – 3 registers dating from 1852-1880, a minute book and a register of vestry men dating from 1870.

NB: These records will be digitised for consultation at PRONI only, not for any form of online release.



Recent cataloguing:

D4631 – The most sizeable accession was a large collection (over 100 PRONI boxes) from the Hearth Housing Association. The collection comprises bills of quantities, architectural drawings, correspondence, funding applications and reports in relation to conservation projects undertaken on buildings of historic importance (1978-2014).

D4633 – the Northern Ireland’s Women’s Football Association [minutes of AGMs, League and Committee meetings; fixtures; correspondence; player’s registration forms; rules; programmes; newsletters and newspaper cuttings. The papers range in date from c. 1979-1992 and comprise c. 1000 documents within 10 folders].

D4634 – the Northern Ireland Photographic Association deposited 50 prize winning prints and digital copies of the same.


D4523 – the Brabazon Sharpe family of Galway and Mayo. The papers date from the early 1700s up until the mid-19th century. The collection includes the papers of Sir William Brabazon, 2nd Baronet of New Park (later Brabazon Park), Swinford, Co. Galway (1803-1840). Sir William was High Sheriff of Co. Mayo (1825-1827), a Justice of the Peace and an M.P. from 1835 until his death. He was a prominent individual in Irish public life, his wide-ranging correspondence touches on aspects of local administration as well as finance, family matters and estate management.


I'll update you all as to the more recent developments at PRONI this weekend.

(With thanks to Gavin McMahon at PRONI)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Tuesday, 30 May 2017

AncestryHour on Twitter

I've just caught the last fifteen minutes of this week's Ancestry Hour (http://www.ancestryhour.co.uk) on Twitter - and it occurs to me that I don't think I've ever actually formally posted about it on this blog. Well a fair exchange is no robbery, and it helps me out, so here we go - a wee word about #AncestryHour!



Ancestry Hour takes place every Tuesday night on Twitter (www.twitter.com) from 7pm-8pm UK time. Simply post about anything to do with genealogy or familyhistory and add in the hashtag #AncestryHour, and everyone following the conversation will see the post. You can see some previous posts at https://twitter.com/ancestryhour, or just type #AncestryHour in the Search box.

So if you want a quick databurst of genealogy happenings on a weekly basis, AncestryHour is certainly one way to do it!

(With thanks to @BordersAncestry, which hosts AncestryHour)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

MyHeritage launches DNA ethnicity analysis

From MyHeritage (www.myheritage.com):

MyHeritage Launches New Comprehensive DNA Ethnicity Analysis

MyHeritage DNA’s new Ethnicity Estimate covers 42 different ethnic regions, more than any other major DNA company; and is uniquely provided for free to those who upload their DNA data from other services



TEL AVIV, Israel & LEHI, Utah, May 30, 2017 - MyHeritage, the leading global destination for family history and DNA testing, and the makers of the successful MyHeritage DNA product, today announced the launch of its new and improved Ethnicity Estimate. The new analysis, developed by the company’s science team, provides MyHeritage DNA customers with a percentage-based estimate of their ethnic origins covering 42 ethnic regions, many available only on MyHeritage, representing the most comprehensive report of its type available on the market. This fascinating report gives users a much better understanding of who they are and where their ancestors came from. The Ethnicity Estimate is presented in an original and engaging format, making it not only interesting but also fun to watch and share.

MyHeritage is unique among the main industry players in allowing users who have tested their DNA already with another service to upload - for free - their data to MyHeritage. Those users receive DNA Matches for free, for finding relatives based on shared DNA. Beginning this week, users who have already uploaded their DNA data to MyHeritage, or who will upload it in the coming months, will receive - for free - the new Ethnicity Estimate. This benefit is not offered by any other major DNA company.

Development of the new Ethnicity Estimate raises the number of ethnic regions covered by MyHeritage DNA from 36 to 42. It was made possible thanks to MyHeritage’s Founder Populations project — one of the largest of its kind ever conducted. For this unique project, more than 5,000 participants were handpicked by MyHeritage from its 90 million strong user base, by virtue of their family trees exemplifying consistent ancestry from the same region or ethnicity for many generations. All project participants received complimentary DNA tests and allowed MyHeritage’s science team to develop breakthrough ethnicity models based on the generated data. Thanks to this analysis, MyHeritage DNA has become the only mass-market percentage-based DNA test that reveals ethnicities such as Balkan; Baltic; Eskimo & Inuit; Japanese; Kenyan; Sierra Leonean; Somali; four major Jewish groups - Ethiopian, Yemenite, Sephardic from North Africa and Mizrahi from Iran and Iraq; Indigenous Amazonian; Papuan and many others. In some cases, competing products can identify and report an aggregated region (e.g., Italian & Greek), whereas MyHeritage has better resolution and identifies Greek, Italian and Sardinian ethnicities separately.

MyHeritage’s new Ethnicity Estimate is delivered to users via a captivating “reveal” experience (view example). It features animation and, as of this week, also original music composed by MyHeritage. Each of the 42 ethnicities has a distinctive tune, based on the region’s cultural elements; all tunes seamlessly connect to each other. This makes the report fun to watch and share over social media.

MyHeritage DNA user Tiffany Bowden said “I'm very happy, and very proud to discover where I come from, and through my MyHeritage DNA ethnicity results, now I have the background which helps me understand who I am as a person.”

“DNA is the future of the family history industry and we’re delighted to enter the DNA space with strong energies and a fresh perspective”, said Gilad Japhet, Founder and CEO of MyHeritage.

“Leveraging MyHeritage's top assets which are its talented, technology-focused engineering team, and the gigantic internationally diverse web of family trees encompassing more than 2.5 billion profiles entered by our users, our comprehensive new Ethnicity Estimate has Innovation written all over it. We’ve been able to dig deeper where others had considered their work complete. Presented in a fresh look and generously given for free to DNA data uploaders, our users will be thrilled and can count on us to continue to innovate in DNA and delight them with new discoveries about who they really are.”

Dr. Yaniv Erlich, Chief Science Officer at MyHeritage, said, “For MyHeritage's science team, this major update of our Ethnicity Estimate is only an appetizer. There are excellent installments on the way, and users can prepare for a feast! We have detailed plans to increase accuracy, extend our Founder Populations project further, and improve the resolution for ethnicities of great interest to our users from highly diverse origins. Our goal is to use science to further the public good, and to bring the best innovations of our science team to the public.”

The MyHeritage DNA test consists of a simple cheek swab and takes less than two minutes to complete, with no need for blood or saliva. The sample is then mailed to MyHeritage DNA’s lab for analysis and the user is invited to view the results on the MyHeritage website, approximately four weeks later.

MyHeritage strengthened its position as the leader in global family history, when it launched the MyHeritage DNA kits in November 2016, which have rapidly become hugely popular ever since. The company’s mammoth user base of 90 million users worldwide, more than 7.7 billion historical records, massive user-generated family tree database and availability in 42 languages, all provide a robust foundation for MyHeritage DNA. The company’s DNA offering currently provides two main features: detailed ethnicity reports that reveal the user’s ethnic and geographic origins, and DNA Matches for finding relatives based on shared DNA. In recent months, people have been successfully using MyHeritage DNA to reunite with long-lost family members.

MyHeritage DNA kits are available at the affordable price of $79 + shipping. Order MyHeritage DNA, or alternatively, upload DNA data for free.


About MyHeritage

MyHeritage is the leading global destination for family history and DNA testing. As technology thought leaders, MyHeritage has transformed family history into an activity that is accessible and instantly rewarding. Its global user community enjoys access to a massive library of historical records, the most internationally diverse collection of family trees and groundbreaking search and matching technologies. Launched in November 2016, MyHeritage DNA is a technologically advanced, affordable DNA test that reveals ethnic origins and previously unknown relatives. Trusted by millions of families, MyHeritage provides an easy way to find new family members, discover ethnic origins, and to treasure family stories, past and present, for generations to come. MyHeritage is available in 42 languages. www.myheritage.com

(With thanks to Daniel Horowitz)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Sunday, 28 May 2017

East Galway records added to RootsIreland

RootsIreland (www.rootsireland.ie) has the following records added from East Galway Family History Society (www.galwayroots.com/east/home):

Non Catholic Marriages 1845-1955 – Parishes of Ardrahan, Athenry, Eyrecourt, Gort, Kilcolgan, Killinane, Kilconickney, Kinvara, Loughrea, Portumna, Tynagh, Woodford.

Census Records – 1889 – Woodford Parish Census

Graveyard Inscriptions – Ahascragh, Aughrim, Beagh, Clontuskert, Craughwell, Kilbeacanty, Kilclooney, Killascobe, Killimordaly, Kilmacduagh, Mountbellew, Moylough, Mullagh and Woodford.


Census Substitutes:

Christmas Donations – Beagh and Gort parishes, 1856

Registry of Freeholds 1829, County of Galway.

Slater’s and Pigot’s Directories, County of Galway, 1824, 1846, 1856, 1870, 1881 and 1894.

Tithe Applotment Books 1823-1850

Further details are available at http://www.rootsireland.ie/2017/05/new-records-added-by-the-galway-east-family-history-society/.

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Saturday, 27 May 2017

Recent UK additions and updates to FamilySearch

Still catching up from some recent news. The following collections on FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org) are shown as being most recently launched or updated on FamilySearch - all are either English or UK collections:

  • England, Warwickshire, Parish Registers, 1535-1984 (28 Apr 2017)
  • England, Norfolk, Parish Registers (County Record Office), 1510-1997 (28 Apr 2017)
  • England, Essex, Bishop's Transcripts, 1779-1892 (28 Apr 2017)
  • England, Northumberland, Non-conformist Records, 1708-1982 (28 Apr 2017)
  • England, Northumberland, Parish Registers, 1538-1950 (28 Apr 2017)
  • England, Manchester, Parish Registers, 1603-1910 (28 Apr 2017)
  • England, Northumberland, Cumberland, Durham, Miscellaneous Records, 969-2007 (20 Apr 2017)
  • England, Durham Diocese, Marriage Bonds & Allegations, 1692-1900 (11 Apr 2017)
  • British Newspaper Archives, Obituaries (16 Mar 2017)
  • England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975 (03 Mar 2017)
  • United Kingdom, Royal Hospital Chelsea: Discharge Documents of Pensioners 1760-1887 (WO 122) (01 Mar 2017)
  • England, Derbyshire, Church of England Parish Registers, 1537-1918 (28 Feb 2017)
  • England, Lancashire, Oldham Cemetery Registers, 1797-2004 (13 Jan 2017)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

FindmyPast - latest additions

FindmyPast (www.findmypast.com) has added several datasets this week. The following collections for England are amongst them:


Surrey institutional records 1788-1939

Explore over 200,000 assorted records from 16 institutions across the English county of Surrey, including poor law unions, workhouses, schools, infirmaries, goals and more. Each result will provide you with a transcript of key details from the source material. The records cover 13 places in Surrey: Addlestone, Chertsey, Cobham, Dorking, Farnham, Godstone, Guildford, Hambledon, Redhill, Richmond Upon Thames, Southwark, Warlingham, and Woking.


Essex Baptism Index 1538-1917

Over 32,000 records covering 50 parishes across the county have been added to the Essex Baptism index. The collection now contains more than 279,000 records taken from a range of original parish and probate documents.


Sussex, Eastbourne Gazette Newspaper Notices

Over 186,000 records have been added to our collection of Eastbourne Gazette Newspaper Notices. The Eastbourne Gazette was a weekly tabloid paper first published in 1859.


Derbyshire Hospital Admissions and Deaths 1855-1913

Over 800 records have been added to our collection of Derbyshire Hospital Admission & Deaths. The collection now contains over 5,000 records taken from two different sources: Derbyshire Royal Infirmary, Deaths 1892 – 1912 and Victoria Memorial Cottage Hospital, Ashbourne Admissions 1899 – 1913.

Further additions include more Irish Newspapers, Australian Capital Territory Deaths and Vermont, Enrolled Militia Records 1861-1867 - further dteails on these and the above-mentioned English collections are available at https://blog.findmypast.co.uk/findmypast-friday-may-26th-2422212258.html.

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

New British Newspaper Archive front page

The British Newspaper Archive (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) website has changed its front page design yet again. It now looks like this on a PC:



And this is how it appears now on a tablet:


The BNA has attempted to explain this new layout at http://blog.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/2017/05/25/our-new-look/.

I have no idea if this was intended to be a better interface for those accessing the site on a PC or from the use of a tablet, but users on both platforms now have much more scrolling to do to find other more useful features, such as recent additions, located well to the bottom and off screen.

I suppose it creates employment...!

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Friday, 26 May 2017

TheGenealogist adds 1920s UK passenger lists

From TheGenealogist (www.thegenealogist.co.uk):

New Passenger Lists go online for the 1920s era

TheGenealogist has just released four and a half million BT27 records for the 1920s. These Outbound Passenger Lists are part of the growing immigration and emigration record sets on TheGenealogist and contain the historical records of passengers who departed by sea from U.K. ports in the years between 1920 and 1929.


With the addition of this decade of records, the already strong Immigration, Emigration, Naturalisation and passenger list resources on TheGenealogist have been significantly expanded.

The fully searchable records released today will allow researchers to:

● Identify potential family members travelling together with SmartSearch. TheGenealogist’s unique system can recognise family members together on the same voyage. In this case it will display a family icon which allows you to view the entire family with one click.

● Find people travelling to America, Canada, India, New Zealand, Australia and elsewhere in the Passenger lists of people leaving from the United Kingdom by sea.

● See images of the original documents which were kept by the Board of Trade's Commercial and Statistical Department and its successors.

● Discover the ages, last address and where the passenger intended to make their permanent residence.

● These fully indexed records enable family historians to search by name, year, country of departure, country of arrival, port of embarkation and port of destination.


Those with ancestors who travelled out of Britain will welcome this fascinating new release from TheGenealogist that adds to their Immigration and Emigration records which already includes passenger lists from as far back as 1896 and the valuable Naturalisation and Denization records.

(With thanks to Nick Thorne)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Thursday, 25 May 2017

Recent National Archives podcasts

The following podcasts have recently bveen made available online by the National Archives in England (www.nationalarchives.gov.uk):

‘Dadland’: the father who was also an undercover guerrilla agent
http://media.nationalarchives.gov.uk/index.php/keggie-carew/

Keggie Carew discusses her book ‘Dadland’, a story about a madcap English childhood, the poignant breakdown of a family, and dementia. The novel centres upon her father Tom Carew, an enigmatic, unorthodox character, who was an undercover guerrilla agent during the Second World War.
‘Dadland’ is the winner of the Costa Biography Award 2016 and a Sunday Times Top Ten Bestseller.

Author: Keggie Carew Duration: 00:36:57


Black British politics and the Anti-Apartheid struggle
http://media.nationalarchives.gov.uk/index.php/black-british-politics-anti-apartheid-struggle/

In 1948, from the introduction of apartheid in South Africa, racial discrimination galvanized the international community into protest. British people and black communities in particular attempted to lead the global opposition against apartheid.
Historian Dr Elizabeth Williams (Goldsmiths, University of London) will discuss aspects of the documents she looked at while writing her book ‘The Politics of Race in Britain and South Africa: Black British Solidarity and the Apartheid Struggle’ (2015).
Please note, due to a technical error this recording ended a few minutes prior to the end of the talk.

Author: Dr Elizabeth Williams Duration: 00:53:59


From the Somme to Arras
http://media.nationalarchives.gov.uk/index.php/somme-arras/

Andrew Lock discusses the progress made by the British Expeditionary Forces between the battles of the Somme (1916) and Arras (1917). Although lessons were learned during the Somme campaign, Arras clearly exposed command and preparation deficiencies, leading to setbacks and the highest casualty rate of any British offensive in the war.

Author: Andrew Lock Duration: 00:49:30

All can be listened to via the above links, downloaded from the sites, or listened to via iTunes.

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Septhttps://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
11th 2017 - details at
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.