Monday, 4 November 2013

British Newspaper Archive site reaches seven million pages

From the British Newspaper Archive (

Online Newspaper Archive Passes the 7 Million Page Mark

The British Newspaper Archive (BNA) passed a giant milestone today, as page number 7,000,000 was added to the site at

Since its launch in November 2011, the BNA has been committed to transcribing thousands of pages a day. With a target of 40 million pages by 2021, this 10-year project is the biggest digitisation of newspapers to take place in the UK.

Ian Tester, The British Newspaper Archive’s Brand Director, said: “We are ecstatic to reach the 7 millionth page. Newspapers are one of the richest resources available to historians, and historical newspapers packed a lot more into a page than modern papers. The Archive holds newspapers that date back to the early 18th Century, and with the 7 million mark passed, we now provide access to comfortably over 100 million stories and articles online – a unique perspective on more than 200 years of historical events.”

The 7 millionth page to be added to the online archive was page seven of the ‘Burnley Express’ for Saturday 30th June 1945. The main headlines of the day include a visit from Winston Churchill, images of servicemen, and an article on the cost of living and pensions.

The website is free to search, with a range of credit and subscription packages available to suit the different needs of researchers who wish to view the paid-for content. Access to the resource is free to users of the British Library’s Reading Rooms.

(Thanks to Natasha White)


My latest book, Discover Scottish Civil Registration Records, is now available from (print) and (ebook), whilst Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet is available at My next Pharos Scottish course, Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs, starts Nov 13th - see


  1. To describe what they are doing as transcribing is incorrect. They are digitising and OCR-ing, which is not the same. Transcribing would mean all the text being retyped by real people, which would be much better, but financially impossible.