Thursday, 5 September 2013

Apprenticeship records on TheGenealogist

From The Genealogist (www.thegenealogist.co.uk):

Press Release: Butcher, Baker, Candlestick Maker… how did your ancestor start their working life?

TheGenealogist has just released over one million Apprentice and master records. This makes over two million searchable records with the apprentices from the census. These can both be searched together by using the keyword “apprentice” in TheGenealogist’s Master Search.

The site helps you find detailed records relating to the occupation of your ancestor. This is the first time you can find apprentices from a whole range of records between 1710 and 1911.

This is the largest searchable collection of apprentice records available online, allowing you to view how your ancestors developed their skills and also if they became a master in their profession.

The detailed records in IR1 cover the years from 1710 to 1811 giving name, addresses and trades of the masters, the names of the apprentices, along with the sum the master received and the term of the apprenticeship. Until 1752, it was also common to see the names of the apprentices’ parents on the record (often including their occupations).

The new records are available to Diamond subscribers in the Master Search and under the ‘Occupation Records’ section. You can search for both Apprentices and Masters.

TheGenealogist allows you to view the full transcript of an apprenticeship record to see more details of your ancestors apprenticeship - including when they started their training, the ‘Master’ who trained them and how long their apprenticeship was scheduled to be.

The Apprenticeship records provide an insight into a method of training that stood the test of time and are today, once again a popular method of training. Many apprentices did their training, worked their way up and then took on apprentices themselves. The Apprenticeship records allow you to trace this with just a few mouse clicks. The handy keyword option also allows you to narrow down your search if you have an idea of the profession or the area your ancestor worked in saving you even more time.

The new records are taken from the ‘IR1 Board of Stamps: Apprenticeship Books’ from The National Archives. As well as the new collection of records, apprentices can also be discovered in the transcribed ‘profession field’ of census records on TheGenealogist from 1841 to 1911.

(With thanks to David Osborne)

NB: The IR1 records can also be found on Ancestry and FindmyPast

Chris

My wife Claire is planning to swim from the Scottish island of Cumbrae to the town of Largs on September 14th to raise money for local charity Gillian's Saltire Appeal, providing respite for families affected by cancer (Claire's mum and sister in Ireland have previously come through cancer, whilst my mum, based in England, currently has bladder cancer). Her Just Giving sponsorship page, with further details, is at http://www.justgiving.com/Claire-Paton1. If you can help to sponsor her, even by a wee amount, we'd be very grateful - many thanks!

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